IT management

IT management - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • Signs that IBM may be preparing for a round of job cuts

    IBM tries to keep its layoffs out of the public eye as much as possible, although it fails miserably at this. The company took the unusual step of denying that it was on the cusp of a gigantic layoff amid reports of a possible new round of job cuts that may begin this week.

  • Premier 100 Alumni, 2000 - 2015

    Our Premier 100 IT Leaders Awards honor individuals who have had a positive impact on their organization through technology. Honored individuals manage internal IT organizations, mentor and motivate their IT teams with interesting challenges, envision innovative solutions to business problems and effectively manage and execute IT strategies. Computerworld's Premier 100 IT Leaders issue, published each year, highlights the accomplishments of the honorees.

  • Degree-free IT: Can college-skippers thrive in tech?

    Mike Samaras has worked steadily in IT for a decade, starting when he was 17 and fresh out of high school.

  • Four ways for IT to connect better with customers

    If you walk by an IT office these days, the only sounds you're likely to hear are the dull whir of laptop fans and the gentle hum of servers -- barely a warm body to be found. The IT staff is on the loose.

  • Recruiting challenges spur higher salaries, better perks

    Skilled job seekers are in an enviable position in the simmering tech industry, as hiring managers compete for talent, boost job offers, and improve on-the-job perks to keep existing employees from looking elsewhere.

  • 10 lessons U.S. tech managers can learn from their counterparts in China

    China is on a technological roll these days -- one that American companies ignore at their own peril. Contrary to outdated Western perceptions, 680 million Chinese have access to either a laptop or a mobile phone, and some 95% of homes in every city in China are now wired for the Internet, according to figures from the Chinese government.

  • IT pro's revitalization guide 2015

    For seasoned and new IT leaders alike, the new year is a good excuse to pause and take stock of your professional and personal progress in our always interesting, always chaotic industry.

  • New Congress may move swiftly to raise H-1B cap

    When the Republicans take control of Congress in January, they may act, with bipartisan support, to raise the H-1B cap.

  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • Digital SOS: How technology can save the USPS

    Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night can compare with the challenges currently facing the United States Postal Service. Email continues to have a crippling effect on the centuries-old agency: The volume of first-class mail, or stamped mail, plummeted by 2.8 billion pieces in 2013.

  • 10 hottest IT skills for 2015

    The pace of job growth in IT may be slowing down, but it's still moving at a strong clip.

  • A CIO fights to keep his tech options open

    In today's IT market, vendors tell users that engineered, converged and highly integrated systems deliver the greatest efficiency. But some users believe a heterogeneous environment is the best path to savings.

  • Forecast 2015: IT spending on an upswing

    It's IT budgeting time for 2015 -- and Barr Snyderwine is reaching for the stars.

  • Blowing the whistle without blowing your career

    Technology professionals are among today's most infamous whistleblowers. The list of those who have made headlines for exposing corporate or government skulduggery includes Shawn Carpenter, a network security analyst who blew the lid off a Chinese cyberespionage ring; Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning, who shared more than 250,000 classified State Department cables with WikiLeaks; and Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about NSA surveillance activities.

  • 3D printing makes its move into production

    The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition.