iPad - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • Apple's 12-inch iPad makes no sense at all!

    Apple intends introducing a 12.9-inch iPad model, and there's some who may think doing so makes no sense at all. They're wrong. Here's why:

  • Review: iPad Air and Retina iPad Mini won't knock your socks off

    The best tablets on the market nonetheless feel more like interim upgrades than milestone devices worth ditching older models for

  • Spec showdown: Apple iPad Air vs Samsung Galaxy Note vs Sony Tablet Z

    Apple CEO Tim Cook spent a bit of time dissing the competition while he was on stage at Apple's iPad Air launch event on Tuesday, but how does Apple's newest tablet stack up against the competition?

  • Perspective: iPad and the keyboard -- getting inside Apple's head

    By arming a larger iPad with a 64-bit processor and a keyboard cover, Apple could crack the nascent 2-in-1 device market -- out-Surface Microsoft and its OEM partners as they push the concept of tablet-as-notebook, notebook-as-tablet -- if it decides the effort's worthwhile, a noted analyst said today.

  • Is Android in the business world to stay?

    It's official, and it's been official for a while -- Android is far and away the most popular smartphone OS in America. Ever since January 2011, when the platform surpassed RIM to take the top spot for the first time in comScore's monthly market share rankings, Google's operating system has continued to grow its user base, which accounts for 52% of the market as of this January.

  • Back up, wipe and restore your iPad

    If you're planning to sell or give away your iPad, then it is essential that your personal information and data be erased from it. If it's running sluggish after a few years, sometimes backing up your data, erasing it from the tablet and restoring it might improve performance.

  • The lazy geek's guide to building a home media center

    Anything less than a DIY digital home entertainment project means making the most of Apple TV

  • 2012: The year Android truly challenged iOS

    Android 'Jelly Bean,' Samsung's Notes, and Google's Nexuses finally delivered compelling capabilities as Apple stalled

  • Tablet smackdown: iPad vs Surface RT in the enterprise

    IPads are already making their way into businesses via bring-your-own-device efforts with Microsoft Surface RT tablets hoping to follow suit as employees lobby for their favorite devices. But which one makes more sense from an IT perspective?

  • Surprise -- the iPad Mini doubles as business tablet

    The iPad Mini's small size doesn't hinder many apps, whereas the fourth-generation iPad adds little value

  • Tablet deathmatch: iPad Mini vs. Nexus 7 vs. Kindle Fire HD

    A new generation of small tablets has reinvented entertainment on the go, but which is best? Find out now and gear up for holiday gift-buying

  • A first look at the iPad mini

    Apple's iPad mini went on sale across Australia this morning. Here's out first thoughts.

  • iPad vs iPad 2

    With the success of the iPad, Apple faced difficulties in making improvements to its successor, the iPad 2.

  • How the iPad will change IT forever

    When evaluating the adoption of mobile enterprise applications, it's important to understand the overall trends driving the adoption of the iPad within the enterprise. As I worked on the book, iPad in the Enterprise: Developing and Deploying Business Applications, I spoke to, interviewed, and received feedback from dozens of technology authors, industry analysts, enterprise software executives, Fortune 1000 CIOs, and other visionaries of enterprise IT. I felt that the best way to explore this concept was to hear from those industry leaders directly.

  • Apple iOS: Why it's the most secure OS, period

    In June 2007, Apple released the iPhone, and the device quickly took off to become a major brand in the smartphone market. Yet when the iPhone shipped, security on the mobile operating system was nearly nonexistent. Missing from the initial iOS (then called iPhone OS) were many of the security features that modern-day desktop software has as a matter of course, such as data-execution protection (DEP) and address-space layout randomization (ASLR). Apple's cachet lured security researchers to test the platform, and in less than a month, a trio had released details on the first vulnerability: an exploitable flaw in the mobile Safari browser.

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