Internet-based applications and services - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • One missed email and Google Inbox will be in trouble

    People may feel overwhelmed by the deluge of email arriving in their inboxes, but will they trust Google to show them the most important messages?

  • Sorriest technology companies of 2014

    It's so far been another sorry, sorry year in the technology industry, with big name companies, hot startups and individuals making public mea culpas for their assorted dumb, embarrassing and other regrettable actions.

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    As Google+ nears 3rd anniversary, where does it go from here?

    With Google's social network coming up on its third anniversary, industry analysts are wondering if the company is rethinking Google+ and where it goes from here.

  • With Gundotra out, changes likely for Google+

    Now that Google's Vic Gundotra, a senior vice president and the head of Google+ is leaving the company, changes are likely afoot at the social network he championed since its inception, industry analysts said.

  • Salesforce at 15: Industry disruptor wards off midlife crisis

    Salesforce.com recently celebrated its 15th year in existence, and as the SaaS (software-as-a-service) vendor races toward US$5 billion in revenue its influence on the industry is being felt more than ever. At the same time, some signs indicate that Salesforce.com is having a few growing pains, as well as showing some trappings of the mega-vendors it once mocked with its "End of Software" marketing campaign.

  • Facebook may lure teen users back with virtual reality promise

    With its acquisition of virtual reality gaming company Oculus VR , Facebook may have found a way to lure back younger users to the social network.

  • Trust issue looms large for tech companies capitalizing on personal data

    As tech companies increasingly rely on analyzing and selling user data to boost revenue, trust is emerging as one of the defining issues of the year for the IT sector.

  • Facebook coughs up $19bn to buy WhatsApp, draw younger users

    Facebook may be shelling out $19 billion in cash and stock for the messaging company WhatsApp to stanch the departure of younger users from the social network.

  • Twitter's slipping user growth spooks investors

    Twitter Wednesday reported that fourth quarter sales more than doubled over the past year, but the company nevertheless spooked investors by acknowledging a slowdown in new user growth and in user engagement.

  • The future of Dynamics in a Nadella-led Microsoft

    Microsoft's Dynamics ERP and CRM product lines seemed safe immediately following former CEO Steve Ballmer's sweeping reorganization of the company last year. But now that longtime Microsoft executive Satya Nadella has been named Ballmer's successor, the time is ripe for more focused speculation on the future of Dynamics. Here's a look at what could be in store.

  • Could Bitcoin's frothy venture funding dry up?

    Bitcoin: What is it, really? A digital currency? An investment? An Xbox game? For many people it's not clear, but that hasn't stopped venture capitalists from going gaga over it.

  • Top tech stories of 2013: Big Brother, wearables, and the struggles of aging tech giants

    Politics collided with the world of technology this year as stories about U.S. government spying stirred angst both among the country's citizens and foreign governments, and the flawed HeathCare.gov site got American health-care reform off to a rocky start. Meanwhile, the post-PC era put aging tech giants under pressure to reinvent themselves. Here in no particular order are IDG News Service's picks for the top 10 tech stories of the year.

  • By the numbers: Twitter vs. Facebook IPOs

    Facebook's IPO was considered an early bust while Twitter's has been deemed a success. In terms of orderly market activity, that's without question. But what about prices?

  • Here comes the age of ambient everything

    Trends in social, search, mobile, wearable and the Internet of things will alter our perception of reality. Change is in the air, says columnist Mike Elgan.

  • The new killer app is a real human

    The future was supposed to be automated and computerised. But it turns out that automation is creating demand for the human element.