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intel - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • FAQ: What is 802.11ay wireless technology?

    Products based on the IEEE 802.11ad (WiGig) standard have really only begun rolling out over the past year, but an effort to deliver an enhancement dubbed 802.11ay in the unlicensed 60 GHz spectrum band that promises to deliver faster and longer range W-Fi networks is gaining steam.

  • FAQ: What in the wireless world is CBRS?

    What is CBRS? Here are the basics on Citizens Broadband Radio Service (i.e., CBRS) shared spectrum in the 3.5 GHz band. Yeah, thats a mouthful, but this tech could have big implications for building private LTE networks and for carriers that want to extend their 4G services.

  • The next MacBook Pro could sport Intel's new 3D XPoint SSD

    Intel's Optane (3D Xpoint) memory, which could be 1,000 times faster than NAND flash, is due out next year, making it a suitable candidate for Apple's next-generation MacBook Pro. Optane will be compatible with the NVMe protocol, which Apple has been an industry leader in using.

  • Bugs & Bugs: As in, the software kind -- and insects

    Bugs & Bugs: Gypsy Moth invasion, cyborg locusts, Zero Days -- the movie, bug problems for Lenovo, Symantec & others, and super interesting research from New York University & others aimed at reducing software bugs

  • Standards are coming for containers

    A list of leading cloud, storage and virtualization companies are backing a new effort named the Open Container Project, which aims to create a set of standards for the fast-growing technology.

  • Five paths for Moore's Law

    For 50 years, Moore's Law has paved the way for faster, smaller and cheaper devices. The observation focuses on the economics and scaling of silicon chips, which are at the heart of computing devices.

  • Moore's Law at 50: The past and future

    When you're strapping on the latest smart watch or ogling an iPhone, you probably aren't thinking of Moore's Law, which for 50 years has been used as a blueprint to make computers smaller, cheaper and faster.

  • Why Israel could be the next cybersecurity world power

    There are plenty of cities in the U.S. that want to lay claim to becoming the "next" Silicon Valley, but a dusty desert town in the south of Israel called Beersheva might actually have a shot at becoming something more modest, and more focused. They want to be the first place you think about when it comes to cybersecurity research, education, and innovation. If things go right there, it may well happen.

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