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IBM - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • Standards are coming for containers

    A list of leading cloud, storage and virtualization companies are backing a new effort named the Open Container Project, which aims to create a set of standards for the fast-growing technology.

  • Java at 20: The programming juggernaut rolls on

    What began as an experiment in consumer electronics in the early 1990s celebrates its 20th anniversary as a staple of enterprise computing this week. Java has become a dominant platform, able to run wherever the Java Virtual Machine is supported, forging ahead despite the rise of rival languages and recent tribulations with security.

  • Docker Inc., leave Docker tools alone

    Several new Docker tools are out there: Docker Machine, Docker Swarm, and Docker Compose. They come from Docker Inc. itself, which has has the advantage of being designed by the same folks who developed the Docker container.

  • Signs that IBM may be preparing for a round of job cuts

    IBM tries to keep its layoffs out of the public eye as much as possible, although it fails miserably at this. The company took the unusual step of denying that it was on the cusp of a gigantic layoff amid reports of a possible new round of job cuts that may begin this week.

  • 2015 IT Data Center Infrastructure Convergence Predictions

    IT infrastructure is constantly riding the often-tumultuous waves of consolidation and separation. A typical example would be the eras of mainframe, open systems, and PC computing. No surprise there. For the past three to five years, server virtualization has been a catalyst for data center consolidation, (even though for the most part, IT has mapped server virtualization initiatives to existing IT infrastructure choices, or dare I say legacy infrastructure).

  • Big names like Google dominate open-source funding

    Network World's analysis of publicly listed sponsors of 36 prominent open-source non-profits and foundations reveals that the lion's share of financial support for open-source groups comes from a familiar set of names.

  • Cisco: See No EVO, Hear No EVO, Speak New Partnerships

    It hasn't been lost on the IT vendor community and IT professionals that Cisco is absent from the VMware EVO:RAIL partner program. With all of the powerhouses participating in the program, you'd think that Cisco would jump right into the mix. Considering Cisco's growth in the server market and the fact that it doesn't currently have its own storage play, this opportunity appears to be ideal for Cisco.

  • Meet Cobol's hard core fans

    Some of the world's largest businesses say their Cobol application infrastructure, running on state-of-the-art big iron, still delivers a powerful competitive advantage. The challenge going forward will be staffing it.

  • Microsoft wants you to forget Windows 8

    Unless MIcrosoft radically changes its habits, it will throw Windows 8 down a deep memory hole even before a successor ships.

  • Why Microsoft isn't spooked by the Apple-IBM alliance

    The Apple-IBM partnership will have little effect on Microsoft's dominance in the enterprise, or drastically change its mutating mobile strategy.

  • Apple-IBM deal threatens Android's enterprise push

    The new Apple-IBM partnership seems sure to help Apple sell more iPads to businesses, but it may also be setting off alarm bells at mobile device management companies large and small.

  • Review: Halt and Catch Fire adds sizzle to PC history

    AMC's new TV series harks back to the early days of PCs -- but drama, not desktops, takes center stage.

  • BlackBerry is laser-focused on the enterprise with BES10

    After encountering problems last year selling its newest smartphones, BlackBerry has shifted to a stronger focus on the enterprise, especially through distribution of its BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10 mobility management client software.

  • Lenovo's IBM server deal mimics multi-market growth strategy used by Samsung and others

    Lenovo's deal to buy IBM's x86 server business for $2.3 billion gives the Beijing company another tech segment where it can expand beyond PCs, smartphones, tablets and smart TVs.

  • Foiled! How to beat software vendors' sneaky price increases

    Between complex licenses and the cloud, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP have lots of ways to hike up prices. Here's how to fight back