IBM

IBM

Features

  • Lenovo's IBM server deal mimics multi-market growth strategy used by Samsung and others

    Lenovo's deal to buy IBM's x86 server business for $2.3 billion gives the Beijing company another tech segment where it can expand beyond PCs, smartphones, tablets and smart TVs.

  • Foiled! How to beat software vendors' sneaky price increases

    Between complex licenses and the cloud, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP have lots of ways to hike up prices. Here's how to fight back

  • Bringing brains to computers

    For decades, scientists have fantasized about creating robots with brain-like intelligence. This year, researchers tempted by that dream made great progress on achieving what has been called the holy grail of computing.

  • Microsoft bets on Windows XP disaster

    Microsoft today used the hoary practice of predicting next year to drive another nail into Windows XP's coffin.

  • 1

    IT hiring goes multimedia

    IT job seekers embrace social media, video and graphics to enhance their resumes and set themselves apart from other job applicants.

  • 1

    Google Apps, once a leader, faces growing Cloud app rivals

    When Google Apps arrived in 2006, it stood on the cutting edge of Web-hosted email and collaboration suites for businesses, a bold pioneer clearing a path in the new, wild frontier of enterprise Cloud computing.

  • Microsoft Word: At 30, the word processing package is king, but threats abound

    It is 30 years old and dominates the word processing market, but Microsoft Word is now more than ever fending off challenges from the cloud where less expensive and even free alternatives pose new threats, experts say.

  • CSC: The Cloud's quiet whiz kid

    When most people who track the industry think of the Cloud computing market, big names like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Google, Rackspace, Verizon Terremark and others come to mind. HP, Joyent, IBM and Dell even. But Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC)?

  • New Dell won't abandon the PC

    Dell officials vow that the company will continue making acquisitions and will remain committed to its struggling PC business once its $24.9 billion deal to go private is complete.

  • SAP's Q2: The hot topics

    SAP is set to release its second-quarter results on Thursday, and as usual market watchers will be paying close attention given the vendor's bellwether status within the enterprise software market.

  • How will Cloud, virtualisation and SDN complicate future firewall security?

    The firewall in decades past was mainly the port-based guardian of the Internet. Now vendors are vying to build so-called "next-generation firewalls" that are "application-aware" because they can monitor and control access based on application use.

  • Salesforce.com aims for next $1 billion business with ExactTarget buy

    Salesforce.com's pending US$2.5 billion purchase of marketing software vendor ExactTarget will help it develop a new $1 billion annual revenue stream and set the company on a clear strategic course for the foreseeable future, according to Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff.

  • Stack wars: OpenStack v. CloudStack v. Eucalyptus

    OpenStack -- co-founded by Rackspace and NASA in 2010 -- certainly has the buzz, what with partnerships with AT&T, HP and IBM, to name a few, all of which have promised to use OpenStack as the base for their private cloud offerings.

  • Smacking SharePoint into shape

    More than half of all SharePoint shops have had to add functionality to the core software, which came as a surprise to a number of them. Here's what they're doing.

  • What to expect at SAP's Sapphire

    SAP's Sapphire conference kicks off next week in Orlando, setting the stage for the company to sell customers on its visions for cloud-based applications, in-memory computing and mobility.

Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia