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Features

  • How machine learning ate Microsoft

    At the Strata big data conference yesterday, Microsoft let the world know its Azure Machine Learning offering was generally available to developers. This may come as a surprise. Microsoft? Isn't machine learning the province of Google or Facebook or innumerable hot startups?

  • Debunking the myths about scale-up architectures

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • IT jobs market booming in the Southwest

    2015 IT Salary & Jobs Regional Report: The Southwest

  • 18 ways to get the most out of Android 5.0

    Got Lollipop? Google's Android 5.0 operating system is slowly but surely making its way to devices around the world -- and like any major OS upgrade, it brings with it a whole new set of options, features, and shortcuts to master.

  • It's a bird, it's a plane, it's the rebirth of satellite Internet

    SpaceX, Facebook, Virgin Galactic and Google have all announced major initiatives that would help connect the world -- especially developing nations -- to the Internet. But the next thing in worldwide connectivity isn't going to be in underground cables, so much as it will be over your head. It starts with satellites, but it gets a lot weirder.

  • An inside look into VMware's new hybrid Cloud strategy

    During the past week VMware has been making power play moves in the Cloud computing market to position its offering as the premier enterprise hybrid Cloud computing platform. As it does so, however, analysts question how well the grand plan VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger has put together stacks up with heavyweights of the cloud computing market, most specifically Microsoft and Amazon Web Services (AWS).

  • Is the ASUS X205 Microsoft's Chromebook killer?

    The ASUS X205 is one of three Windows 8.1 notebooks, all released in November, designed to halt the encroachment of Chromebooks into the low-end Windows notebook market. (The other two are the HP Stream 11 and HP Stream 13.)

  • The never-ending quest to dethrone email

    Build a better mousetrap, as the cliché has it, and the world will beat a path to your door. That line of thinking has even been applied to the most rudimentary corners of the technology world: standards and protocols that have stuck around for decades, yet viewed as creaky and badly in need of replacement. But few old-guard standards have seen as many pretenders to the throne as the SMTP/POP3/IMAP email triumvirate has. If only someone could come up with an alternative that did everything email did but better, more securely, and with less hassle, wouldn't it be worth it?

  • Big names like Google dominate open-source funding

    Network World's analysis of publicly listed sponsors of 36 prominent open-source non-profits and foundations reveals that the lion's share of financial support for open-source groups comes from a familiar set of names.

  • What Microsoft's 'fresh start' browser strategy means

    Microsoft will unveil a browser not named Internet Explorer (IE) alongside Windows 10, according to an online report.

  • Digital SOS: How technology can save the USPS

    Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night can compare with the challenges currently facing the United States Postal Service. Email continues to have a crippling effect on the centuries-old agency: The volume of first-class mail, or stamped mail, plummeted by 2.8 billion pieces in 2013.

  • Cloud upstarts: Too cheap to trust?

    Hosting provider Atlantic.net launched a $0.99 per month cloud server this fall, which is significantly less expensive than the $0.013 per hour starting price for market-leader Amazon Web Services' on-demand Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) virtual machines.

  • How Apple could exploit a forever-free iCloud

    While Google and Microsoft are using large amounts of free cloud storage to sell inexpensive consumer notebooks, Apple has stood above the fray.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

  • Contain yourself: The layman's guide to Docker

    Welcome to the age of containerization, where an ecosystem led by startup Docker is leading IT organizations to ineffable peaks of efficiency, helping them scale their workloads ever-higher, and probably baking them a nice cake to boot (it's my birthday, I have cake on the brain, sue me). Microsoft, Google and Amazon Web Services are all tripping over themselves to make sure prospective customers know that their  clouds are the place to be if you want to get the most from Docker.