Facebook - News, Features, and Slideshows


  • How Facebook keeps you from hating its apps

    Nothing provokes app uninstalls like sluggish performance and aggressive battery consumption. Facebook reveals how it uses mobile device testing to prevent those uninstalls.

  • America’s data centers are getting a lot more efficient

    U.S. data centers have used about the same amount of energy annually over the past five years or so, despite substantial growth in the sector, according to a new report published by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  • One billion people hated Facebook on Monday

    For the first time, Facebook recorded more than a billion active users in a day: Monday saw about 15% of the world's population log in to watch cat videos, argue about politics, stalk ex-lovers, and publicly complain about bad service...

  • Could Facebook be your next phone company?

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • How machine learning ate Microsoft

    At the Strata big data conference yesterday, Microsoft let the world know its Azure Machine Learning offering was generally available to developers. This may come as a surprise. Microsoft? Isn't machine learning the province of Google or Facebook or innumerable hot startups?

  • It's a bird, it's a plane, it's the rebirth of satellite Internet

    <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/01/19/google-spacex-internet-plans/?ncid=rss_truncated">SpaceX</a>, Facebook, <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/article/2871304/security0/virgin-galactic-wants-to-launch-2-400-comm-satellites-to-offer-ubiquitous-broadband.html">Virgin Galactic</a> and Google have all announced major initiatives that would help connect the world -- especially developing nations -- to the Internet. But the next thing in worldwide connectivity isn't going to be in underground cables, so much as it will be over your head. It starts with satellites, but it gets a lot weirder. 

  • Displaced IT workers are being silenced

    A major problem with the H-1B debate is the absence of displaced IT workers in news media accounts. Much of the reporting is one-sided -- and there's a reason for this.

  • Privacy is the new killer app

    A funny thing is happening in the wake of the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490179/security0/security0-the-snowden-leaks-a-timeline.html">Edward Snowden NSA revelations</a>, the infamous <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2601905/apple-icloud-take-reputation-hits-after-photo-scandal.html">iCloud hack of celebrity nude photos</a>, and the hit parade of customer data breaches at <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490637/security0/target-finally-gets-its-first-ciso.html">Target</a>, <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2844491/home-depot-attackers-broke-in-using-a-vendors-stolen-credentials.html">Home Depot</a> and the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2845621/government/us-postal-service-suffers-breach-of-employee-customer-data.html">U.S. Postal Service</a>. If it's not the government looking at your data, it's bored, lonely teenagers from the Internet or credit card fraudsters.

  • 4 startups that are changing productivity

    By now, you've likely <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2837807/one-missed-email-and-google-inbox-will-be-in-trouble.html">heard about Inbox</a>, Google's bold new plan to reinvent email with a smarter, more context-sensitive interface that treats messaging like just another to-do list.