Most popular

News about encryption
Tutorials about encryption
  • Open source FreeOTFE encrypts disks handily

    FreeOTFE may sound like a political bumper sticker, but it stands for "Free On The Fly Encryption." The "Free" part is self-explanatory; "On The Fly Encryption" refers to the encrypting/decrypting of data as it is written to or read from your hard disk.

  • Firesheep, Blacksheep, and protecting your Wi-Fi data

    Despite the convenience, free public Wi-Fi networks like those found in hotels, Starbucks, and McDonald's are also a serious risk when it comes to your data and personal information.

  • Full disk encryption comes to workgroups

    Losing your laptop can be expensive in three ways. First, you'll spend hundreds or thousands of dollars to replace the hardware. Second, you'll suffer the time and aggravation of restoring your data, all the while hoping you have everything backed up properly. But most expensive? Surviving the backlash and legal consequences of losing customer data, financial records and private company information.

Features about encryption
  • A clear-eyed guide to Mac OS X's actual security risks

    Apple has improved its security in recent years, but is it enough?

  • 1

    Lavabit-DOJ dispute zeroes in on encryption key ownership

    The government's insistence, in its dispute with Lavabit, that cloud service providers hand over their encryption keys when asked, has refocused attention on the issue of key ownership and management in the cloud.

  • Security Manager's Journal: When technologies collide

    An encryption initiative runs into the law of unintended consequences, since the legal department can't search encrypted emails for e-discovery purposes.

  • How DRM could ensure cloud security

    Yet another survey is indicating that security is a big issue for those intending to take up cloud computing.

  • Your laptop data is not safe. So fix it.

    The largest single type of security breach is the stolen or lost laptop, according to the Open Security Foundation, yet these computers are among the least protected of all IT assets. The costs of a data breach can be huge, including the loss of trade secrets, marketing plans, and other competitive information that could have long-term business damage, plus the immediate costs of having to notify people if their personal information was possibly at risk from the breach. Particularly in a recession, enterprise management can't afford to take these risks lightly.

Whitepapers about encryption

Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia