cloud computing

cloud computing - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • InfoWorld review: Heroku cloud application platform

    Heroku is a pure platform as a service -- that is, the entire infrastructure is managed by Heroku and not by you. As such, deploying a Ruby application, whether or not it is Rails based, is practically effortless. Deployment, in fact, is performed as a part of a regular SCM (software configuration management) sync via <a href="http://www.infoworld.com/d/application-development/torvaldss-git-the-it-technology-software-version-control-167799">Git, an innovative, freely available, and quite popular distributed source code management system pioneered by Linus Torvalds</a>, the creator of Linux.

  • InfoWorld review: Engine Yard Cloud

    Although code deployment might not be as easy with Engine Yard as with <a href="http://www.infoworld.com/d/application-development/infoworld-review-heroku-cloud-application-platform-180342">Heroku</a>, the Engine Yard platform is dramatically more tunable. In fact, in many ways, Engine Yard is closer to an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) than a platform as a service (PaaS). Engine Yard provides a base infrastructure tuned to run Ruby applications, but the rest is up to you. Engine Yard does offer <a href="http://www.infoworld.com/d/application-development/torvaldss-git-the-it-technology-software-version-control-167799">Git integration</a>; however, deployment is not executed via a push, as in Heroku, but rather via Engine Yard's suite of tools and its extensive dashboard, which can sync with a Git repository.

  • Ruby clouds: Engine Yard vs. Heroku

    In the world of Ruby development, there are two primary cloud-based, platform-as-a-service offerings: Engine Yard and Heroku. Both provide an easy-to-scale, managed hosting environment, both are built on Amazon EC2, and both have a long and intimate history with the Ruby community. Nevertheless, they offer contrasting approaches and features that will appeal to different audiences.

  • The cloud security checklist

    Whether you're a small business relying on Google Docs for document sharing or an enterprise moving your global ERP system to the cloud, you should demand that some common security and compliance requirements are met by vendors providing applications and services over the Web. These requirements involve who can access your applications and data, as well as the systems hosting them; where the data is stored; and whether the data is hosted on dedicated, rather than on shared, hardware. They also ensure that you get detailed logs of who has accessed your data and applications so that you meet corporate and regulatory standards, and they verify that data is properly encrypted -- a factor that's more critical outside the corporate firewall.

  • Microsoft: Office 365 a hit, especially with small businesses

    Office 365, Microsoft's cloud collaboration and communication suite for organizations, is selling eight times faster than its predecessor, the Business Productivity Online Suite (BPOS) and has been particularly successful among small businesses, which make up over 90 per cent of its customer base,according to the company.

  • NetApp, Iron Mountain team up on medical archive service

    Iron Mountain <a href="http://www.ironmountain.com/Company/Company-News/News-Categories/Press-Releases/2011/November/28.aspx">today announced</a> a secure cloud-based archive service for medical data based on NetApp's grid-architecture, object-based, storage software.

  • Mohawk Fine Papers builds integration-in-the-cloud

    Just two weeks after Mohawk Fine Papers made the decision to sell its products on Amazon.com, integration work was complete, connections to its ERP system lit up and sales started rolling in. "Amazon generated tens of thousands of dollars in revenue immediately," says <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/344513/Paul_Stamas_vice_president_of_IT_Mohawk_Fine_Papers">Paul Stamas</a>, vice president of IT at the $83 million, 725-employee manufacturer of premium papers.

  • Microsoft expected to trumpet Office 365 momentum on Tuesday

    Microsoft on Tuesday is expected to tout what it considers strong momentum in the adoption of its Office 365 cloud-hosted collaboration and communication suite, particularly among small companies that previously were unable to afford on-premise implementations of Exchange and SharePoint, according to people familiar with the announcement.

  • Making sure your Cloud provider can protect your data as promised

    At the end of my Cloud Expo West presentation last week, I was asked, "How can we verify that a Cloud provider actually has all of these infrastructure and security mechanisms in place?" It's a great question, one that deserves a fuller answer than I was able to give in the time available.