cloud computing

cloud computing - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Amazon built Top 500 supercomputer in its own cloud

    Last week we reported that HPC company Cycle Computing built a 10,000-core cluster on the Amazon EC2 cloud service. Cycle CEO Jason Stowe boasted that the cluster was big enough to make the list of the world's Top 500 supercomputers -- if only it had been subjected to the required speed test. Well, it turns out there already is a cloud-based supercomputer on the Top 500 list -- and it was built by Amazon itself.

  • 6 biggest cloud computing myths

    1. It’s insecure.

  • Dropbox: Insecure by design?

    The fundamental security of the Dropbox cloud storage service has been called into question by a researcher.

  • Ex-NASA cloud builder's startup boosts OpenStack software

    The former chief architect of NASA's Nebula cloud computing platform has founded a new company that will use the OpenStack project to bring cloud capabilities to enterprise customers.

  • IBM takes cue from cloud for new pricing model

    IBM is taking the pay-as-you-go pricing model of cloud services and applying it to some of its software products for cloud service providers.

  • Microsoft accuses Google of lying about Apps for Gov't

    In a scathing blog post, one of Microsoft's top lawyers alleged that Google has been falsely claiming that its Google Apps for Government service has an important certification.

  • Microsoft putting ERP in the Azure cloud

    Microsoft is moving its Dynamics ERP (enterprise resource planning) applications to its Azure cloud platform, the company announced Monday at the Convergence conference in Atlanta. The belated move represents a major change for the way Microsoft sells Dynamics, which has traditionally been sold through partners in on-premises and hosted form.

  • Report: Iron Mountain to shutter cloud storage service

    After only two years, Iron Mountain is planning to close its public cloud storage services , having already stopped accepting new customers as of April 1, according to market research firm Gartner.

  • Dell to spend $1B on cloud services this year

    As the market for cloud services grows, the big enterprise IT vendors are moving swiftly to develop cloud offerings that cater to their respective markets.

  • Cisco CEO calls for dramatic cuts and a narrowing of priorities

    Dramatic expense cuts and a narrowed focus on five networking technologies, including video, are coming to Cisco Systems as part of a massive planned turnaround, Cisco CEO John Chambers told financial analysts Thursday.

  • 10,000-core Linux supercomputer built in Amazon cloud

    High-performance computing expert Jason Stowe recently asked two of his engineers a simple question: Can you build a 10,000-core cluster in the cloud?

  • Cloud CIO: 5 key pieces of rollout advice

    The spread of enthusiasm for cloud computing seems unstoppable. Cloud computing -- a term that was unknown prior to 2007 -- has been named by Gartner as the number one priority for CIOs in 2011. One cannot recall a technology development that has gone from unheard-of to a key role in IT plans so quickly. So why has this unprecedented fervent cloud furor come to pass?

  • Google apps: How we locked down documents

    Although Google Apps has made progress over the past few years as a cloud-based collaboration and productivity suite for businesses, the first big wave of adopters have been government agencies, schools and nonprofit organizations.

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    Cloud computing standards: Too many, doing too little

    Two years ago, when the Desktop Management Task Force (DMTF) announced a standards-building effort for cloud computing, most people involved in cloud computing didn't even have a common definition of cloud computing. Now there are so many categories of cloud computing and so many competing standards that users have a good chance of finding a standard that matches a particular need, but not much chance of moving among them easily, says James Staten, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research.

  • Senators: E-surveillance law needs to be updated

    The U.S. Congress needs to rewrite a law governing law enforcement access to mobile-phone data, e-mail messages and other electronic communications to reflect changes in technology, including a growing reliance on cloud computing, several senators said Wednesday.