News

  • CA buys cloud consulting company 4Base

    Betting that moving to the cloud won't be as easy as vendors promise, CA on Thursday bought 4Base, a consulting firm that helps companies adopt and implement the cloud.

  • Riverbed readies cloud, mobility and virtualization rollout

    Riverbed has products on tap that will enable WAN optimization as a cloud service, speed up the boot time for remote virtual desktops and, perhaps in a year or two, a software client that will speed up the performance of handhelds and smartphones.

  • Supercomputing Grows in the Cloud

    An economy that continues to stagnate could prove a boon to an increasing number of providers of on-demand supercomputing capacity.

  • Microsoft Exchange in the cloud: Four migration tips

    Tired of managing those Exchange servers in your data center? So are many other companies, and even some of America's Fortune 50 companies are now starting to migrate e-mail and other productivity apps to the cloud -- disproving the notion that SaaS and cloud services are fit only for small or mid-sized businesses.

  • Google: 129 million different books have been published

    For those who have ever wondered how many different books are out there in the world, Google has an answer for you: 129,864,880, according to Leonid Taycher, a Google software engineer who works on the Google Books project.

  • Salesforce Patent Settlement a Win for Microsoft Azure

    Microsoft and Salesforce.com have agreed to settle their patent suits against each other. The tale of two clouds can move on to the next chapter now as the two agree to disagree and enter into a license sharing agreement for the competing cloud technologies.

  • Vmware finds 'killer app' in Salesforce.com add ons

    The VMforce cloud platform in development by VMware and Salesforce.com will be most useful for customers with existing Salesforce deployments, but can technically be used to build any Java application, a VMware official says.

  • Amazon: Enterprises should adjust expectations for cloud

    The reported problems Amazon had last week in negotiating a contract with Eli Lilly point to a disconnect between what cloud providers offer and what large enterprises expect -- though some analysts say they also reflect a lack of flexibility at Amazon.

  • Is IT dead?

    The latest news from HP should be chilling to IT employees: The company is eliminating 9,000 IT positions.

  • Google Apps intrigues IT pros, but security worries remain

    Google likes to boast that more than 2 million businesses run Google Apps, but IT pros harbor concerns about security in the cloud and the limited functionality presented by Google tools such as Gmail and Google Docs.

  • Microsoft's 2010 software 'most complicated lock-in decision in years'

    Microsoft's 2010 software suites present "the most complicated lock-in decision in years," and many customers will be justified in sticking with the 2007 versions of Office, Exchange and SharePoint, Burton Group analysts said this week at the Catalyst conference.

  • Microsoft to push harder for cloud

    Microsoft is shifting its strategy away from pitching itself as a company that can offer companies a choice of software or hosted services, toward pushing the cloud, an executive said on Thursday at the software giant's annual financial analyst meeting.

  • CRM prominent on Google Apps marketplace

    CRM (customer relationship management) software has established a significant foothold on Google's Apps Marketplace since its launch in March, according to an official blog post this week.

  • Canonical bundles Linux, IBM database for the cloud

    Canonical is offering enterprises a chance to try cloud computing via a virtual appliance that bundles Ubuntu Linux with the IBM DB2 Express-C database running on the Amazon EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud) public cloud platform.

  • Set Up a Virtualization Server

    If there's one technology that can greatly improve computing environments of any size, it's virtualization. By using a single physical server to run many virtual servers, you can decrease operational costs and get far more bang for your buck. Whether your company is a 2-server or 2000-server shop, you can benefit from server virtualization in a variety of ways. The best part? You can do it cheaply and easily.

Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia