News

  • Even the most secure cloud storage may not be so secure, study finds

    Some cloud storage providers who hope to be on the leading edge of cloud security adopt a "zero-knowledge" policy in which vendors say it is impossible for customer data to be snooped on. But a recent study by computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University is questioning just how secure those zero knowledge tactics are.

  • For Red Hat, it's RHEL and then...?

    Red Hat is hosting its annual summit this week - this year in San Francisco - where the company is seemingly basking in the glory of making more than a billion dollars off a free open source project.

  • Sedgman unearths greater value for cost with ITSM switch

    Sedgman has cut its IT service management costs in three by shifting ITSM platforms, according to Sedgman IT Manager, Andrew Reid.

  • Big data drives 47% growth for top 50 public cloud companies

    Big data analytics are driving rapid growth for public cloud computing vendors with revenues for the top 50 public cloud providers shooting up 47% in the fourth quarter last year to $6.2 billion, according to Technology Business Research Inc.

  • News Corp migrates first users to Google Apps

    News Corp Australia has migrated its first major group of users to Google Apps. In an email sent to staff yesterday, chief technology officer Tom Quinn wrote that 180 technical team members had been migrated to the new platform.

  • Big Data drives 47 per cent growth for top 50 public Cloud companies

    Big data analytics are driving rapid growth for public cloud computing vendors with revenues for the top 50 public cloud providers shooting up 47% in the fourth quarter last year to $6.2 billion, according to Technology Business Review Inc.

  • How to use service catalogs to combat cloud sprawl

    Cloud usage is growing dramatically, but unfortunately some of that growth is the result of employees going around IT and obtaining services directly, resulting in cloud sprawl. Service catalogs can help you get your arms around cloud services, regain control of business processes, and enable you to better serve business users.

  • GPT's breakneck cloud transition

    For an enterprise to completely ditch on-premise hardware for the cloud is a radical step. To do so in the space of a year might be considered a little unhinged.

  • Monkeys, armed bees deliver resilience for NAB

    Two open source tools have helped National Australia Bank build a resilient cloud-based infrastructure to deliver its online presence, David Broeren, head of the digital and online channels at the bank, told the Amazon Web Services summit in Sydney today.

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    Mazda shifts content platforms, hosting partners

    Mazda Australia's online presence has been overhauled, with the company refreshing not just its Web content for the launch of the new model of Mazda3 but also the CMS driving the site and the car manufacturer's hosting partner.

  • How Boeing is using the Cloud

    There's a lot of talk about the Cloud, but how are businesses really using it?

  • Interop 2014: Mobile is here, Cloud is next, SDN is coming

    Interop, one of the premier shows for networking each year, kicked off its general session on Wednesday proclaiming that a new era of IT is upon the world, led by a mobile revolution and supported by cloud computing. And more change is on the way as software-defined networking quickly matures into a platform for enterprises to seriously consider.

  • How Google is reinventing Cloud pricing

    Last week Google released a feature called Sustained Use Discounts, the idea of which is that the more customers use Google's Cloud Platform, the less expensive it becomes.

  • Travel agent takes flight with cloud

    Jumping from managed hardware to the cloud has paid off at Sydney-based travel agency Jetabroad, slashing deployment time and cutting costs, according to the company's chief technology officer, Benjamin Ranck.

  • Driving innovation at Fidelity Investments

    Fidelity Investments is one of the world's largest providers of financial services, with assets under administration of $4.7 trillion, and it didn't get there by using yesterday's technology. In fact, the company has a standalone group, Fidelity Center for Applied Technology – more commonly referred to as Fidelity Labs -- whose job it is to take the long view, to examine technologies years before they become mainstream and help the firm get a leg up.

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