CIO role

CIO role - News, Features, and Slideshows


  • Read CW's new July digital magazine!

    <a href="">Download</a> the Computerworld Digital Magazine!

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Faye K. Sahai

    With the title of vice president of innovation and advanced technology, it's no surprise that Faye K. Sahai had a hand in cutting-edge projects at <a href="">Kaiser Permanente</a>.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Gerry McCartney

    <a href="">Purdue University</a> wants its students to succeed, and it's using big data to make that happen.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Jay Ferro

    When Jay Ferro, 46, joined the <a href="">American Cancer Society</a> as CIO three years ago, he was given a herculean task -- to transform the nonprofit's 12 independent divisions and corporate headquarters into a single entity, beginning with IT.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Ryan Boone

    Ryan Boone has a simple philosophy for blending IT with the business at discount retailer <a href="">Dollar General</a>: "Do the work."

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Alissa Johnson

    A peculiar atmosphere takes hold within <a href="">White House</a> IT operations as a change in presidential administrations nears: The enthusiasm for undertaking new projects seems to wane.

  • How the 2015 Computerworld Premier 100 IT Leaders were chosen

    Each year, <em>Computerworld</em> accepts nominations from across the industry -- from vendors, IT users, public relations and marketing professionals, <em>Computerworld</em> readers and past Premier 100 IT Leaders honorees. Eligible nominees include CIOs, CTOs, senior vice presidents, vice presidents, IT directors and managers from a cross-section of user and vendor companies and their IT divisions, including but not limited to professionals in network management, database management, Web management, help desk operations, application development, project management, contract management and procurement.

  • Premier 100 IT Leaders: Primed for business

    Mike Jennings knows a thing or two about fast-paced businesses and demanding customers. As the former senior director of IT at LinkedIn and now the head of IT at Airbnb, Jennings is used to a neo-startup environment where the speed of business is breakneck and the customer -- who is both tech-savvy and exacting -- is king.

  • 10 lessons U.S. tech managers can learn from their counterparts in China

    China is on a technological roll these days -- one that American companies ignore at their own peril. Contrary to outdated Western perceptions, 680 million Chinese have access to either a laptop or a mobile phone, and some 95% of homes in every city in China are now wired for the Internet, according to figures from the Chinese government.

  • For half, STEM degrees lead to other jobs

    The truth, when it comes to computer employment data, is almost always ugly.

  • University CIO helps boost graduation rates with analytics

    Brian A. Haugabrook, interim CIO at Valdosta State University in Georgia, deployed analytics tools that enable faculty and staff to identify students who need extra help. The effort paid off with higher graduation rates.

  • Microsoft CEO Nadella aces first-100-day test

    If Satya Nadella is celebrating his first 100 days as CEO of Microsoft today, no one can blame him, a corporate leadership expert said.

  • The Grill: Rotary CIO Peter Markos

    Peter Markos, CIO and general manager for Rotary International, contends with challenges ranging from authenticating a constantly changing list of users who need to access Rotary's systems to enabling applications that work for a vastly diverse membership.

  • Do you understand your company's personality?

    Corporate culture may matter even more to your project's success than ROI does. Here's how to work with it rather than against it.

  • Tips for speaking like a business strategist

    You know technology cold, you understand the business, and you're ready to step up to a senior IT leadership position, but can you communicate all that to the C-suite? Here's how other CIOs got their voices heard.