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News about broadband
  • Optus welcomes NBN decision on HFC

    Optus has said it welcomes a decision by NBN to roll out fibre to the distribution point (FTTdp) in areas covered by the telco’s hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC) network.

  • NBN ditches Optus HFC for FTTdp

    NBN will not be using Optus’ hybrid-fibre coaxial (HFC) assets outside of the one area — Redcliffe in Queensland — where they are currently used to provide National Broadband Network connections. Instead the company has announced it will proceed with a larger rollout of fibre to the distribution point in the areas within the Optus HFC footprint.

  • Coalition, Labor back new NBN committee

    Labor has backed a move by the government to create a joint standing committee that will scrutinise the rollout of the National Broadband Network until its completion, which is expected in 2020.

Features about broadband
  • ​Large cracks appear in nbn business case

    The key operational, financial metrics show that if it follows its current trajectory, the NBN model will reduce competition by squeezing out the mid-tiered telco companies and ultimately put a significant cost burden on to the consumer – thus, negating its original purpose and promise.

  • It's a bird, it's a plane, it's the rebirth of satellite Internet

    <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/01/19/google-spacex-internet-plans/?ncid=rss_truncated">SpaceX</a>, Facebook, <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/article/2871304/security0/virgin-galactic-wants-to-launch-2-400-comm-satellites-to-offer-ubiquitous-broadband.html">Virgin Galactic</a> and Google have all announced major initiatives that would help connect the world -- especially developing nations -- to the Internet. But the next thing in worldwide connectivity isn't going to be in underground cables, so much as it will be over your head. It starts with satellites, but it gets a lot weirder. 

  • As AT&T and Google push broadband adoption, the feds are non-players

    AT&T and Google have talked up plans to extend supercharged broadband speeds to several U.S. cities and offer lesser service for free to underserved areas. But whether they, and other providers, can bridge the nation's digital divide without federal help remains to be seen.

  • Broadband faces a fork in the road

    As Google and AT&T race to provide super-fast 1 gigabit fiber networks to power users, more than a quarter of U.S. homes still have no broadband service at all.

Whitepapers about broadband

  • What to expect from 802.11ac

    Although residential Wi-Fi applications are a primary focus for these 802.11ac technologies, they will also have a considerable impact on enterprise wireless LANs (WLANs). Both increasing the wireless bandwidth in a cell and the trend towards multiple antennas will make it easier to provide seamless Wi-Fi coverage around physical obstructions, such as elevator shafts and stair wells. Download to learn more.

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