News

  • Where's my gigabit Internet, anyway?

    For Americans used to roughly 10Mbps broadband connections, the idea of gigabit Internet can feel a little like science fiction. Streaming 4K video without hiccups? Enormous file downloads happening in seconds? Oh, sure.

  • Israeli start-up, working with GE, out to detect Stuxnet-like attacks

    The Stuxnet malware known to have stealthily targeted Iranian nuclear facilities a few years ago was a wake-up call about how vulnerable critical industrial systems can be to cyberattack. Now, an Israeli start-up, with help from General Electric, is testing security technology that would detect Stuxnet-like attacks on critical infrastructure systems used for power production.

  • Still deploying 11n Wi-Fi? You might want to think again

    In this Network World Digital Spotlight, "Harnessing Gigabit Wi-Fi," we do a deep dive on the latest Wi-Fi developments.

  • Can Heartbleed be used in DDoS attacks?

    With nearly every major threat to information security, it is not long before security experts ask the question, "Can the threat play a role in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks?" When it comes to Heartbleed, some people are screaming that the sky is falling, but it is more complicated than that.

  • iPhone 6 rumour rollup for the week ending April 11

    Hopes, like spring daffodils, burst into bloom this week in the certainty that the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 will arrive in just five short months as Chinese worker bees prepared the massive assembly lines that will bring the smartphones into the world. And could the 5.5-inch iPhone be far behind?

  • IRS plays-up identity theft, fraud fight

    While tax return fraud seems to have hit epidemic proportions, the Internal Revenue Service today said it has started more than 200 new investigations this filing season into identity theft and refund fraud schemes.

  • Who's to blame for 'catastrophic' Heartbleed Bug?

    The Heartbleed Bug, basically a flaw in OpenSSL that would let savvy attackers eavesdrop on Web, e-mail and some VPN communications that use OpenSSL, has sent companies scurrying to patch servers and change digital encryption certificates and users to change their passwords. But who's to blame for this flaw in the open-source protocol that some say also could impact routers and even mobile devices as well?

  • Fake Android anti-virus app taken down

    Virus Shield, by developer Deviant Solutions, was a handsome, apparently easy-to-use security app for Android devices. For $4, the app promised hassle-free, ad-free security for Android users, without impacting battery life or performance. And, mostly, Virus Shield delivered - no ads, no fuss.

  • iPhone 6 rumour rollup for the week ending April 4

    In the iOSphere, the whole week seemed like one long April Fool's Joke.

  • Meru unveils speedier, higher capacity enterprise access point

    Meru Networks has announced two new dual-stream, enterprise 802.11ac access points, including one designed to replace an Ethernet wall plate.

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    New federal rule requires banks to fight DDoS attacks

    Banks and financial institutions regulated by the federal government must now monitor for distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks against their networks and have a plan in place to try and mitigate against such attacks, a federal regulatory body said this week.

  • Security pros talk about playing defense against cybercrime

    Security professionals are playing defense against cybercrime, and often feel outgunned by tech-savvy hackers and insiders out to steal sensitive data from within the business. They see a shortage of qualified security personnel to call on, but also believe that threat-detection tools are getting better.

  • JAMF's Casper Suite makes it easier to set up, deploy, manage iOS devices

    A new release of JAMF Software's Casper Suite automates management tasks for iOS devices by leveraging key changes Apple has introduced for enterprise customers.

  • How to respond to a data breach

    Data breaches seem to be happening at an absurdly rapid rate these days with reported incidents involving the theft of personally identifiable information hitting 25,566 in 2013 up from 10,481 in 2009.

  • FireEye, AhnLab score low in lab test of breach detection systems

    In an evaluative lab test, FireEye and Ahnlab each scored "below average" on their breach-detection systems (BDS) in a comparative group product test which was conducted by NSS Labs.

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