Virtualisation » Reviews »

  • Review: Cloud Foundry brings power and polish to PaaS

    Cloud Foundry impresses with broad application support, streamlined deployment, and enterprise extras from Pivotal, though initial setup could be simpler

  • Sync, store and share data with Transporter Sync

    The scoop: Transporter Sync, by Connected Data, about $100 (plus cost of external storage drive)

  • Nutanix NX-3000 review: Virtualization Cloud-style

    Nutanix Virtual Computing Platform brings resilient, cloud-like server and storage infrastructure to traditional virtualization deployments

  • Review: Dell WYSE delivers Android-on-a-stick

    Thin clients aren't very exciting, and for a reason: they're designed to allow remote access to servers, usually with a Citrix, Microsoft, or VMware client. The folks at Dell WYSE have spiced up the category by building a thin client on top of Android, and getting it down to a form factor only slightly larger than a USB memory stick.

  • Review: Apple's iWork for iCloud is elegant but limited

    Apple's online productivity suite is exceptionally polished and easy to use, but lacking in word processing and spreadsheet features

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    Review: Office Online is great for Word and Excel, not PowerPoint

    Word Online and Excel Online are surprisingly capable, but PowerPoint Online and Office document compatibility are still half-baked

  • Big data showdown: Cassandra vs. HBase

    Bigtable-inspired open source projects take different routes to the highly scalable, highly flexible, distributed, wide column data store

  • Fedora tips its hat to mobility, cloud, big data

    The latest release of Fedora, nicknamed "Heisenbug," is a step towards making Fedora a player in the mobile arena. Fedora 20 also includes more support for cloud, and this is also the first release that supports cheap, low-power ARM processors as a primary architecture, in addition to Intel and AMD chips.

  • First look: Docker is a better way to deploy your apps

    A long time ago, a computer program was a stack of punch cards, and moving the program from computer to computer was easy as long as you didn't drop the box. Every command, instruction, and subroutine was in one big, fat deck. Editors, compilers, and code repositories have liberated us from punch cards, but somehow deploying software has grown more complicated. Moving a program from the coding geniuses to the production team is fraught with errors, glitches, and hassles. There's always some misconfiguration, and it's never as simple as carrying that deck down the hall.

  • Ultimate cloud speed tests: Amazon vs. Google vs. Windows Azure

    A diverse set of real-world Java benchmarks shows that Google is fastest, Azure is slowest, and Amazon is priciest

  • Nutanix NX-3000 review: Virtualization cloud-style

    Nutanix Virtual Computing Platform brings resilient, cloud-like server and storage infrastructure to traditional virtualization deployments

  • Flash your way to better VMware performance

    PernixData FVP clusters server-side flash to improve virtual machine performance and reduce SAN latency

  • Cloud services for mobile developers: Google vs. Amazon vs. Azure vs. Parse

    Cloud-based back ends for mobile applications combine key services with varying degrees of complexity

  • Office 365 administration made easy

    Going beyond Office 365's native admin GUI, 365 Command provides powerful Exchange admin capabilities without the need to run PowerShell

  • SDN showdown: Examining the differences between VMware's NSX and Cisco's ACI

    The arrival of Software Defined Networking (SDN), which is often talked about as a game changing technology, is pitting two industry kingpins and former allies against each other: Cisco and VMware.

  • Ubuntu 13.10 takes aim at Microsoft, Apple, Google

    Ubuntu is moving into the rarified class of operating systems that cover x86/x64 clients and servers, ARM-based tablets/smartphones, and commodity cloud instances. Meaning that it's taking on everybody from Microsoft to Red Hat to Apple and Google.

  • VMware vSphere 5.5 bulks up with more muscle, high-availability

    VMware's latest salvo in its virtualization war with Microsoft is vSphere 5.5, which features a host of improvements, the most interesting being high availability, support for Big Data/Hadoop and improved storage and backup.

  • Review: Dueling hybrid cloud wizards

    CloudVelocity and Ravello Systems march clones of in-house servers into the cloud for development, testing, and disaster recovery

  • Puppet vs. Chef vs. Ansible vs. Salt

    The proliferation of virtualization coupled with the increasing power of industry-standard servers and the availability of cloud computing has led to a significant uptick in the number of servers that need to be managed within and without an organization. Where we once made do with racks of physical servers that we could access in the data center down the hall, we now have to manage many more servers that could be spread all over the globe.

  • Microsoft takes off the gloves with Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1

    In Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1, Microsoft has released a combination of operating system updates that we find very compelling. Microsoft has joined much of the rest of the industry in annual release roll-ups with feature additions, and this time, they listened to the critics. More interesting are the one-upmanship features targeted directly at its virtualization and cloud competition. Some were stunning, despite a few strange and perhaps anecdotal basic problems that we found.