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  • Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud

    More and more organizations are moving SharePoint and SQL workloads into Microsoft Azure in the cloud because of the simplicity of spinning up servers in the cloud, adding more capacity, decreasing capacity without having to BUY servers on-premise. What used to cost organizations $20,000, $50,000, or more in purchasing servers, storage, network bandwidth, replica disaster recovery sites, etc and delay SharePoint and SQL rollouts by weeks or month is now completely managed by spinning up virtual machines up in Azure and customizing and configuring systems in the Cloud.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

  • Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

    Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

  • Microsoft Azure ML -- Big Data Modeling in Azure

    Microsoft has jumped in with both feet with the release to Preview of a new Microsoft Azure-based tool that helps organizations do Machine Learning and predictive analysis all from a Web console.

  • Supreme Court goes 1 for 2 on big tech decisions

    Wednesday was a big day for technology cases in the Supreme Court. The Justices ruled on a pair of important cases that promise to have wide-ranging implications for the development and use of modern technology for years and decades to come. But the effects of the decisions aren't necessarily what either side in the cases has been arguing.

  • A wake-up call for the Cloud

    Every so often something happens that should make people stop and think. That may have just happened in the Cloud.

  • US intelligence agency wants brain-like algorithms for complex information processing

    Getting computers to think like humans has been a scientific goal for years -- IBM recently said it found a way to make transistors that could be formed into virtual circuitry that mimics human brain functions.

  • Breaking down the wall between VMware vSphere and cloud

    As infrastructure and operations professionals seek to broker cloud services for the enterprise, they are coming to terms with the need to "cloudify" existing vSphere infrastructure in order to make these environments more developer-friendly and support migration of workloads to AWS or other clouds as their needs evolve.

  • Aligning cloud vision with adoption

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • How to address SaaS visibility and security using cloud app gateways

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • The important thing to keep in mind about Microsoft's new Machine Learning cloud tool

    In its battle for public cloud supremacy, Microsoft announced a new service today that it plans to debut next month: A predictive analytics and machine learning tool.

  • Adobe CS and the dangerous Cloud

    Adobe's Creative Cloud outage inconvenienced its users, but future Cloud failures could damage the global economy.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Who needs operating systems anymore? Not you

    OSs will still matter to developers and engineers, but ordinary users are going to be more and more in the cloud, where their OS doesn't matter at all.

  • Jonny Evans: Microsoft, the wallflower

    The choice of Satya Nadella as CEO suggests that the consumer-market party is over for the company, as it turns its attention to the unglamorous world of infrastructure.

  • Preston Gralla: Can Amazon drones save the economy?

    As the federal government abandons funding primary and applied research, companies like Google and Amazon can pick up the slack.

  • Career advice: Where to focus? Data, data, data

    Premier 100 IT Leader Richard Maranville also answers questions on career management.

  • Lessons learned from a cloud evaporation

    Cloud provider Nirvanix went belly up. Even if you weren't one of its clients, you can learn things from that mess.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Why the shutdown is like the cloud

    Our manager hadn't realized how the government affected his daily life until he couldn't get to government websites that hold information he needs.

  • Global winners and losers post-Snowden

    EU privacy hawks and U.S. cloud providers have seen their near-term outlooks swing following the former NSA contractor's disclosures.

  • NASA's cloud audit holds value for all

    NASA's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) recently audited and evaluated the efficacy of the space agency's efforts to adopt cloud-computing technologies. The resulting report, "NASA's Progress in Adopting Cloud-Computing Technologies," includes six recommendations "to strengthen NASA's IT governance practices with respect to cloud computing, mitigate business and IT security risks and improve contractor oversight." While the recommendations are specific to NASA, their underlying concepts can be leveraged by any organization that wants to more effectively adopt cloud-computing services.