Unified Communications » Interviews »

  • 1

    Polycom CEO Robert Hagerty talks telepresence

    Videoconferencing is available for desktops and even through specially designed rooms called telepresence systems, but on wireless handhelds? According to Robert Hagerty, who has been CEO of Polycom for 10 years, it could be widely available soon.

  • Open source identity: Asterisk founder and Digium CTO Mark Spencer

    Imagine an IP voice and unified communications system that can be integrated into any application and customised to meet business needs. Sounds great, right? Well that project is the Asterisk IP-PBX and it's free to use and you get the source code. A far cry from proprietary PBX systems perhaps, but Asterisk has a vibrant ecosystem and is replacing systems from more established telephony vendors. Following interviews with the leaders of the Horde and Free Telephony projects, the Open Source Identity series talked to Asterisk founder and Digium CTO Mark Spencer about how one application can have such a profound effect on businesses and how open source can be a tough competitive landscape.

  • NATs necessary for IPv6, says IETF chair

    We posed a few questions to Russ Housley, chair of the Internet Engineering Task Force, about why the standards body is developing network address translations for IPv6 when IPv6 was supposed to eliminate the need for NATs on the Internet. Here's what Housley had to say.

  • Three Minutes with Nokia's Enterprise Chief

    Nokia, the world's largest handset maker, is well known for its consumer devices but maintains a range of enterprise products. Mary McDowell is executive vice president and general manager of Nokia's Enterprise Solutions, a division that deals with products from the E Series phones to security appliances to software such as the Intellisync Mobile Suite, designed to manage a fleet of enterprise devices. She spoke with Jeremy Kirk about Nokia's direction in several enterprise areas.

  • Cisco promises advanced next-generation networks

    Cisco introduced its Services Oriented Network Architecture less than two years ago, and now the company says the SONA concept in action will reduce corporate costs and move customers toward virtualized services, including security, voice, mobility, applications, management, processing and storage -- with the network as the common facet. Bill Ruh, vice president of Advanced Services at Cisco, recently discussed with Network World Senior Editor Denise Dubie about why network engineers should be already be incorporating the principles of SONA into their network design and how Cisco's services-oriented architecture (SOA) would help them better architect and navigate tomorrow's next-generation networks. Can you give me a bit of background on SONA?

  • 1

    Matching the BlackBerry with the corporate PBX

    Can you trust the folks who recently brought you a 12-hour wireless e-mail outage to bring your cell phone to the corporate PBX?

  • New, former Digium CEOs on Asterisk PBX future

    Open source PBX maker Digium has appointed Danny Windham to be CEO of the company and announced that its founder, Mark Spencer, will become chairman of the board and CTO. The two men answered questions during a teleconference Tuesday about the future of the company, which markets the open source Asterisk IP PBX. Some of the questions and answers follow.

  • Killian: Verizon-MCI merger is meeting goals

    Verizon Business, an operating unit formed after Verizon Communications acquired MCI, marked its one-year anniversary on Jan.6. The U.S.-based operation expects total revenue to exceed US$20 billion for 2006, leading Verizon Business President John Killian to call it "a very good first year." In a recent interview with Computerworld, Killian talked about the past year, the competition and the future of his business unit.

  • Extreme CEO looks to converge data, computing

    When a former server/storage executive takes over a networking company, you can expect things to change. This process is happening at Extreme Networks, where Mark Canepa began working as CEO in August after a stint as the executive vice president of Sun's data management group. He spoke with Network World Senior Editor Phil Hochmuth about his plans for Extreme, how the company will compete with Cisco, and the convergence of data center technologies.

  • Nortel CTO: Cost, security worry customers

    Peter Carbone, chief architect at Nortel for nearly three years and the company's chief technology officer since late November, talked with Computerworld about what he called the "invisible network," technology innovations that will bring about next-generation networks and how Nortel's customers see the company. A Nortel veteran of 28 years, Carbone also said that security is an ever present and growing concern for companies as they move more of their business operations to the network.

  • Equant exec: Innovation is key to competition

    Barbara Dalibard, executive vice president at Paris-based France Telecom, is president and CEO of service provider Equant, which France Telecom purchased in August. After a recent technology demonstration in Cambridge, she talked with Computerworld about the need for innovations to stay ahead in the telecommunications field and how the company plans to use its global reach to set itself apart from competitors.

  • Avaya CEO on VOIP issues

    Avaya was borne out of AT&T/Lucent's legacy. But since its 2000 launch, the enterprise telephony vendor has tried to recast itself as an enterprise applications company, with a focus on voice. Recent moves include the migration of Avaya's legacy PBX to a Linux-based server application, and the introduction of an application server for partners and users to develop VOIP-integrated software such as applications that integrate VOIP and messaging with ERP software, Web sites or portals. Avaya CEO Donald Peterson recently discussed the company's evolution, as well as current trends in the enterprise VOIP market, with Network World Senior Editor Phil Hochmuth.

  • Bell Labs grapples with VOIP, open source

    Voice over IP (VOIP) and open source technology hold great promise for cost savings, but also threaten traditional ways of doing business. Rather than shy away from the challenges that these disruptive technologies represent, Bell Laboratories, the renowned R&D (research and development) arm of Lucent Technologies Inc. in Murray Hill, New Jersey, is attempting to bring them into the mainstream.

  • Avaya CEO Don Peterson looks ahead

    Donald K. Peterson, the chairman and CEO of Avaya, came to the company from Lucent Technologies, where he was chief financial officer from 1996 to 2000. Avaya, spun off from Murray Hill, N.J.-based Lucent in October 2000, sells communications equipment, software and services, and services made up half of its US$5 billion revenue last year.

  • Sonic helps organizations share information

    With its SonicXQ architecture, Sonic Software provides a backbone that helps organizations share information across the enterprise and across the Net. Sonic's vice president and chief technology evangelist, David Chappell, met with Steve Gillmor, News Editor Mark Jones, and Lead Analyst Jon Udell to discuss the importance of asynchronous Web services and the standards process surrounding the next generation of communications.

  • Novell CTO on Zenworks, company direction

    Alan Nugent, chief technology officer at Novell Inc. in Provo, Utah, joined the company in June after holding several jobs in technology top management, including roles as managing partner and CTO at Silver Spring, Md.-based Palladian Partners Inc. and CIO and CTO at Vectant Inc., a telecommunications and service provider in New York. He was also CIO at American Re-Insurance Co.

CIO
ARN
Techworld
CMO