Storage » Interviews »

  • You can't make it run better if you don't know where the problem lies

    Riverbed Technology is best known for its WAN optimization tools, but the company has branched out over the years through multiple acquisitions. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Eric Wolford, president of the company's Products Group, to see how the company is trying to help customers squeeze more efficiency out of their IT resources.

  • Cloud computing causing rethinking of disaster recovery

    Cloud computing gives organisations the opportunity to rethink many traditional IT practices, but it may be a particularly good fit for disaster recovery and business continuity.

  • Storage Companies Have a Condescending Approach Towards Mid-Size Businesses: Syed Masroor

    NetApp India is at the forefront of storage innovation. The company is now aggressively targeting the mid-size business tier in India with new offerings. We talk to Syed Masroor, head-technology and solutions organisation, try to understand NetApp's vision and how competition is failing to tap the mid-size businesses storage market. We also probe him about the storage trends the company is seeing in India.

  • Intel/McAfee: What's the future of security?

    Intel completed its multibillion-dollar acquisition of McAfee almost a year and a half ago, and this week McAfee co-President Mike DeCesare spoke with Network World senior editor Ellen Messmer about what the merger of Intel's chip-making capabilities and McAfee's security expertise is expected to bring down the road.

  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst weighs in on strategy, Oracle and growth

    Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst is coming up on his five-year anniversary at the helm, following his arrival in December 2007. Under Whitehurst's leadership, Red Hat's revenue has grown from US$523 million in its fiscal 2008 to more than $1.1 billion in its fiscal 2012, without deviating from its core strategy of open-source infrastructure software.

  • 10 questions for ownCloud CFO Dan Curtis

    Name: Dan Curtis

  • Decision on world’s largest radio telescope imminent

    Next month, the Australasian SKA Consortium is likely to find out whether Australia and New Zealand will host the Square Kilometre Array — the world’s biggest radio telescope.

  • Hitachi GST CEO claims hard drive future hangs in Cloud

    In March, Western Digital agreed to buy Hitachi Global Storage Technologies> (HGST), the disk drive subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd., in a stock and cash transaction valued at $US4.3 billion. HGST CEO Steve Milligan will join WD as president at the closing of the deal, expected in the fourth quarter.

  • Interview: EMC's Gelsinger shares storage federation vision

    Pat Gelsinger made headlines in September 2009 when he left Intel to join EMC as president and COO of information infrastructure products, a group that includes the company's information storage and information security businesses. Now, Gelsinger -- who was Intel's first chief technology officer and led both the desktop products group and the digital enterprise group during his career at the chip maker -- is making waves again.

  • Quantum CEO on EMC's buyout of Data Domain

    Now that EMC has purchased deduplication technology leader Data Domain, its reseller agreements with the likes of FalconStor Software Inc. and Quantum Corp. for the same type of single-instancing technology could be in jeopardy. Quantum resells both its tape libraries and dedupe software through EMC, sales that amount to less than 10% of its revenue.

  • Q&A: Praveen Asthana, Dell's director of enterprise storage

    Dell has continued to move its storage product line and services upstream, adding more sophisticated software into its arrays, which have traditionally been targeted at small to midsize businesses. At the same time, the company says it will increase its offerings around cloud-based computing, both in on-site and off-site backup and disaster recovery.

  • Affordable SSDs in the offing?

    September is usually too early to draw year-end conclusions, but I'll go out on a limb to say that 2008 will be remembered as a key year for SSDs (solid-state drives) -- not so much for sales figures, which won't likely reflect the hype surrounding flash SSDs this year, but for the technology itself, which remains one of the most controversial to hit storage in recent times.

  • Publisher squeezing IT energy costs via smart data center design

    EBSCOhost is a fee-based research service that provides libraries in North America with access to more than 20 million articles from 20,000-plus journals and magazines, all driven from two data centers in the coastal town of Ipswich, Massachusetts. The data centers are owned and operated by EBSCO Publishing, the second-largest business unit of EBSCO Industries, which is one of the largest privately held firms in the Fortune 500. Michael Gorrell, senior vice president and CIO for EBSCO Publishing, explained that green IT principles are fundamental to helping the company keep up with sales growth averaging 26 percent per year for the last three years and storage growth of 200 percent annually, without equivalent growth in computing and data center infrastructure.

  • How Deloitte's IT team has gone green

    Saving on energy costs is obviously a good thing, but to Larry Quinlan, CIO at the consulting firm Deloitte, green IT simply makes good business sense. "If you run green IT right, you will end up with a vastly superior IT organization," Quinlan said during his keynote address at the recent Network World IT Roadmap event in the US, in which he described green IT as one of five technologies that will change IT. From reducing demand for IT resources to thin laptops, Quinlan has no shortage of ideas on how to make green IT deliver on multiple fronts.

  • Q&A: Fujitsu Exec says solid-state disk doesn't measure up

    While most major disk-drive manufacturers have developed or are already selling solid-state disk drives or hybrid drives, which use a combination of flash memory and spinning disk, Fujitsu has chosen not to develop a product for market. Joel Hagberg, Fujitsu's vice president of business development, said his company does not plan to launch any solid-state disk-drive products over the next two years because the value proposition of the technology is not compelling enough and won't be until technology breakthroughs change solid-state disk's performance and reliability.

  • Q&A: IT is a moving target for Six Flags CIO

    With 20 parks and nearly US$1 billion in sales, Six Flags is the second-largest amusement park operator in the world. Since coming to Six Flags as part of a management reorganization two years ago, CIO Michael Israel has overseen a bottom-up rebuilding of the IT architecture in the parks and in the company's data center, which moved from New York to Dallas. Israel describes the amusement park business as a shopping mall with rides. "Spend per attendee is everything," he says.

  • Symantec chief talks acquisitions, Cisco's snub

    Symantec chairman and CEO John Thompson last week delivered a keynote speech to thousands of security professionals at the RSA Conference 2008 in the US. Ellen Messmer caught up with Thompson at the RSA event, where he expanded on a range of topics including vendor alliances, Symantec's competition and the importance of data-loss prevention technology.

  • Ex-Google CIO says firm moving to cut energy costs

    In an interview last month, Douglas Merrill, Google's CIO until he was hired Thursday as president of EMI's digital business division, talked about how the Internet search pioneer's IT organization is configured (not structured), how CIOs need to evolve and the most exasperating question that people ask him at cocktail parties.

  • Samba's Tridge clusters code and crowds

    Andrew "Tridge" Tridgell, the man behind the Samba file server and self-confessed TSP packet molester talks with Dahna McConnachie about Samba and some of his other favourite pastimes. Tridge will be speaking more about clustered Samba at the upcoming linux.conf.au.

  • Ch-Ch-Chatting with the South Pole's IT manager

    From the start, Henry Malmgren was determined to get to the South Pole. After graduating from Texas Tech University in 1998 with a degree in MIS he applied for a job in the Antarctic every year before NSF contractor Raytheon finally hired him as a network engineer in 2001. Since then he has alternated between the Denver headquarters and the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, spending two summers and two winters there before finally working his way up to IT manager. Staying over is a commitment: Once the winter starts, there's no way to get in and out of the base until summer begins eight to nine months later. "I thought I would just do this for a single season, but somehow it always seemed too easy to keep coming back," he says.

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