Storage » Features »

  • Deep Dream: Artificial intelligence meets hallucinations

    Artificially intelligent neural networks can not only identify images, they can be used to generate images Hieronymus Bosch would have been proud of.

  • How low can you go? Kaminario announces sub-$1/GB all-flash storage pricing

    Flash, the choice of a new (IT) generation and increasingly affordable. Vendor Kaminario claims to slice costs further than anyone else

  • Tintri covers the bases — all-flash and hybrid-flash storage

    Choice is, to mangle a marketing line, the choice of a new generation. Tintri aims to offer it in spades to storage customers.

  • Google cloud ''loses'' data (sky falling; film at 11)

    Google is sorry to report it's lost some cloud customers' data. Lightning struck four times near its St. Ghislain, Belgium data center. From cloud to cloud, as't were, causing some storage to go bye-bye...

  • The Cloud gets mobile apps moving

    Immediately after Hurricane Sandy tore through New York City in October 2012, city officials needed a quick way to show the damage that had been done to streets and infrastructure.

  • OpenStack is redefining the business model for data solutions

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Final Windows 10 upgrade forecast sees OS on 440M PCs by early '17

    By February 2017, Microsoft should have Windows 10 on more than 440 million personal computers, according to a new analysis of user share data and upgrade tempo.

  • Replace your NAS with cloud storage: the 8 key requirements

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Read CW's new July digital magazine!

    <a href="http://resources.idgenterprise.com/original/AST-0146906_Computerworld_July_2015.pdf">Download</a> the Computerworld Digital Magazine!

  • Standards are coming for containers

    A list of leading cloud, storage and virtualization companies are backing a new effort named the Open Container Project, which aims to create a set of standards for the fast-growing technology.

  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

  • The No. 1 midsize place to work in IT: Credit Acceptance

    Six months after arriving at Credit Acceptance Corp. as a contract tech support analyst, Chris Thomas hired on as a full-time employee. He hasn't looked back.

  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.

  • How we chose the Best Places to Work in IT 2015

    For the 22nd year in a row, Computerworld conducted a survey to identify the 100 best places to work for IT professionals. As we first did in 2014, this year we once again present the top organization data sorted by size.

  • Tour the three No. 1 Best Places

    Competition was fierce this year to determine Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT. In a white-hot jobs market, organizations are pulling out the stops to attract and retain talented, visionary tech workers.

  • Top firms for training, retention, benefits and career development

    Organizations make it onto Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT list by excelling in training, benefits, retention and career development, among other attributes.

  • 9 hot enterprise storage companies to watch

    Amidst all the venture investments this year in startups that generate gobs of data -- from those focused on everything from apps to drones to the Internet of Things to Big Data -- are a batch of newcomers aiming to help organizations store and access all that information. Yes, storage companies are pulling in big bucks in 2015, as they did in 2014, and a couple have even double-dipped this year and announced two rounds of funding.

  • Hot skills alert: Tips for landing a plum project manager's job

    Karen Klein had a typical entrance into the project management profession, evolving into the role after working her way up the IT ranks.

  • 5 reasons you should move your video to specialty storage

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • First look: Couchbase's new SQL for NoSQL

    Couchbase might seem like a bit of an outsider in the world of NoSQL datastores. After all, MongoDB grabs most of the limelight, while Cassandra and HBase have sewn up most of the big data world, and Redis has pretty much supplanted Memcache as the key/value cache that people reach for by default. But Couchbase has not been sitting on the sidelines looking in. You might not know it from Hacker News, but the use of Couchbase Server has been growing steadily for the past couple of years.