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  • Microsoft's Spartan browser vs. the rest: How will it stack up?

    Microsoft's upcoming Spartan browser is set to be the first big new release in the desktop browser market for quite some time, upsetting a tentative equilibrium that has existed for roughly the past two years.

  • Coding for cars: The next generation of mobile apps

    For several decades, enterprise developers had to support one simple platform: computers on desks. Then the smartphone came along and we had to find ways to deliver the data to a smaller, more mobile rectangle. All of these challenges, however, prepare us little for the next big platform to come: the automobile.

  • Put your API on a JSON diet

    Last week I discussed design considerations for APIs, given that APIs aren't applications and shouldn't be treated as such. At small scales, APIs that come along for the ride with bulky Web frameworks might be fine, but beyond that you're asking for trouble. If you're building an API that will serve a large number of clients, your API code should be thin and tight, as well as make liberal use of caching. Otherwise, the future headaches will be crippling.

  • Could Facebook be your next phone company?

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • OpenStack Board Member Rob Hirschfeld on the impact of DevOps, SDN, Docker & more

    I recently had the great pleasure to sit down with community-elected OpenStack board member and Crowbar co-creator, Rob Hirschfeld. Rob shared awesome nuggets of wisdom on data center and cloud operations, you can view the video and the full transcript below:

  • How machine learning ate Microsoft

    At the Strata big data conference yesterday, Microsoft let the world know its Azure Machine Learning offering was generally available to developers. This may come as a surprise. Microsoft? Isn't machine learning the province of Google or Facebook or innumerable hot startups?

  • Node.js goes pro: New opportunities -- and risks

    In its mere five years of existence, Node.js has transformed from a technological curiosity to a technology stack all its own, providing a major building block for everything from microservices to APIs.

  • TypeScript: Industrial-strength JavaScript

    Historians who reflect on JavaScript's emergence as a dominant programming language in the 21st century may find themselves quoting Donald Rumsfeld: "You go to war with the army you have, not the army you might wish to have."

  • The rise of China's smartphone makers

    After Apple and Samsung, which companies are selling the most smartphones around the globe?

  • What developers can do to extend smartphone battery life

    Battery power consumption remains a lingering problem on smartphones -- and is getting worse with the latest advances in the devices. But developers can take steps to tackle the issue.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

  • Functional languages rack up best scores for software quality

    Language design makes a difference in software quality, and functional languages offer an edge when it comes to building quality software, a study of programming languages and code quality in GitHub reveals.

  • Python-powered StackStorm sets scripts for event-triggered automation

    StackStorm, staffed by former members of GitHub, PuppetLabs, SwiftStack, Rackspace, and the Apache Libcloud team, has launched the first public version of its eponymous open source operations automation solution.

  • What's new with Java

    I'm sick of Java, as you probably are too. That said, there have been a number of changes to Java lately that may have flown under the radar. So, here is what you need to know about where things stand.

  • When it comes to mobile, IT is out of touch

    "I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you!" warned Abraham Simpson - of the Springfield Simpsons - way back in 1996.

  • 7 reasons Apple should open-source Swift -- and 7 reasons it won't

    Faster innovation, better security, new markets -- the case for opening Swift might be more compelling than Apple will admit

  • 15 technologies changing how developers work

    A long time ago, developers wrote assembly code that ran fast and light. On good days, they had enough money in their budget to hire someone to toggle all those switches on the front of the machine to input their code. On bad days, they flipped the switches themselves. Life was simple: The software loaded data from memory, did some arithmetic, and sent it back. That was all.

  • The future of Dynamics in a Nadella-led Microsoft

    Microsoft's Dynamics ERP and CRM product lines seemed safe immediately following former CEO Steve Ballmer's sweeping reorganization of the company last year. But now that longtime Microsoft executive Satya Nadella has been named Ballmer's successor, the time is ripe for more focused speculation on the future of Dynamics. Here's a look at what could be in store.

  • The Open Source Rookies of the Year Awards

    , the open source software management company, picks the top 10 open source projects launched in the past year, based on stats collected from the

  • Mac flashback: Bill Gates on the business impact of the Macintosh (3/2/1987)

    Microsoft chairman praises Macintosh but never sees corporate buyers being a strong point for Apple

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