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  • What developers can do to extend smartphone battery life

    Battery power consumption remains a lingering problem on smartphones -- and is getting worse with the latest advances in the devices. But developers can take steps to tackle the issue.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

  • Functional languages rack up best scores for software quality

    Language design makes a difference in software quality, and functional languages offer an edge when it comes to building quality software, a study of programming languages and code quality in GitHub reveals.

  • Python-powered StackStorm sets scripts for event-triggered automation

    StackStorm, staffed by former members of GitHub, PuppetLabs, SwiftStack, Rackspace, and the Apache Libcloud team, has launched the first public version of its eponymous open source operations automation solution.

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    What's new with Java

    I'm sick of Java, as you probably are too. That said, there have been a number of changes to Java lately that may have flown under the radar. So, here is what you need to know about where things stand.

  • When it comes to mobile, IT is out of touch

    "I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you!" warned Abraham Simpson - of the Springfield Simpsons - way back in 1996.

  • 7 reasons Apple should open-source Swift -- and 7 reasons it won't

    Faster innovation, better security, new markets -- the case for opening Swift might be more compelling than Apple will admit

  • 15 technologies changing how developers work

    A long time ago, developers wrote assembly code that ran fast and light. On good days, they had enough money in their budget to hire someone to toggle all those switches on the front of the machine to input their code. On bad days, they flipped the switches themselves. Life was simple: The software loaded data from memory, did some arithmetic, and sent it back. That was all.

  • The future of Dynamics in a Nadella-led Microsoft

    Microsoft's Dynamics ERP and CRM product lines seemed safe immediately following former CEO Steve Ballmer's sweeping reorganization of the company last year. But now that longtime Microsoft executive Satya Nadella has been named Ballmer's successor, the time is ripe for more focused speculation on the future of Dynamics. Here's a look at what could be in store.

  • The Open Source Rookies of the Year Awards

    , the open source software management company, picks the top 10 open source projects launched in the past year, based on stats collected from the

  • Mac flashback: Bill Gates on the business impact of the Macintosh (3/2/1987)

    Microsoft chairman praises Macintosh but never sees corporate buyers being a strong point for Apple

  • 15 hot programming trends - and 15 going cold

    Programmers love to sneer at the world of fashion where trends blow through like breezes. Skirt lengths rise and fall, pigments come and go, ties get fatter, then thinner. But in the world of technology, rigor, science, math, and precision rule over fad.

  • How to extract custom data from Google Analytics

    Not happy with the Google Analytics interface? We show you how to use a programming language like R to bypass Google Analytics and retrieve the data you want.

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    As the digital revolution kills jobs, social unrest will rise

    Gartner is forecasting some major changes in technology, especially in areas like 3D printing, machine learning and voice recognition. They are all powerful trends that will reduce the need for workers, and, as a consequence, bring social unrest, the analyst firm said.

  • New smartphone OSes take baby steps forward

    Four new smartphone OSes intend to challenge Apple and Google's dominant position. Mozilla's Firefox OS is the first out of the gate, but Canonical, Samsung Electronics and Intel, as well as Finnish upstart Jolla Mobile, are also getting their alternatives ready.

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    Ballmer's chance of changing Microsoft? Don't bet on it

    Microsoft's attempt to transform its dog-eat-dog corporate culture into a kinder, gentler cooperative climate is likely doomed, an expert in failed business strategies said today.

  • Microsoft's ambivalence about Office on the Web gives Apple shot with iWork on iCloud

    Almost as an afterthought, Apple has announced it was working on browser-based versions of its iWork productivity applications, a move one analyst said challenged Microsoft's Office behemoth.

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    40 years ago, Ethernet's fathers were the startup kids

    Bob Metcalfe, Dave Boggs and the rest of the scientists at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in 1973 were a lot like young developers at a Silicon Valley startup today.

  • Google woos developers as software becomes more important

    Google did its best to court developers at this year's I/O conference with a much-needed integrated developer environment, API for better games and the ability to more easily translate apps. Their allegiance will become increasingly important as smartphone and tablet hardware sees fewer dramatic improvements.

  • Five pioneering paths for software development's new frontier

    Size (and mobility) matters. As desktop PCs lose ground to tablets and smartphones, and the Cloud becomes a more mainstream means for software deployment, desktop applications are being elbowed aside by mobile apps and Web services, resulting in a significant shift in the way software is created.