Software Development » Features »

  • Apple's iOS 9 takes ad blockers to dangerous new heights

    The ad-blocking wars were already damaging, but Apple is pushing it to an alarming level

  • Salesforce Aura ventures into open source -- to a point

    Salesforce's Aura framework for designing business apps is open source, but you'll have to pay for its drag-and-drop design tools

  • Why Node.js beats Java and .Net for Web, mobile, and IoT apps

    Speed, scalability, productivity, and developer politics all played a role in AnyPresence’s selection of Node.js for its enterprise development platform

  • Brace for these 5 big changes in Bootstrap 4

    An alpha is out for the next version of the popular Web design framework, so here's what designers interested in migrating from Bootstrap 3 need to keep in mind

  • Why developers have more power than you think

    Many people still believe developers simply do what they're told, but as Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson says, skyrocketing demand for more and better software is putting devs in the driver's seat

  • Kill Flash? Be careful what you wish for

    The death of Flash will impact more than a few enterprise IT solutions, with nasty repercussions for admins

  • How Apache Ranger and Chuck Norris help secure Hadoop

    The Hadoop ecosystem has always been a bag of parts, each of which needs to be secured separately -- at least they did need that, until Apache Ranger came to town

  • Microsoft (yes, Microsoft!) ups the container ante

    Oh how the worm has turned, and today sees Microsoft roll out container-friendly technologies.

  • Cisco's Thor project swings a hammer at Web video codecs

    Cisco is the latest big name to take on the challenge of developing an unencumbered video compression technology

  • Cobol -- yes, Cobol -- gets a bridge to Node.js

    Cobol and Node.js may seem like an odd pairing, but a developer has created a link between the two platforms, despite criticisms

  • What's on tap for Mozilla's Rust in 2016

    Incremental compilation, cross-platform deployment, and features that don't break the language are all planned for the new year

  • Stop the funeral! Objective-C is alive and kicking

    Objective-C may no longer be the stylish language choice for Apple iOS and Mac OS development -- that mantle is being assumed by Swift, <a href="http://www.infoworld.com/article/2929599/application-development/believe-it-or-not-swift-debuted-a-year-ago-today.html">introduced in mid-2014</a>. But proponents of Objective-C don't expect it to go away quietly anytime soon.

  • Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC) applications emerge as the tech stabilizes

    Perhaps the single-most significant standards based technological advancement in the field of unified communications over the past year has been the completion of Web Real Time Communication (WebRTC) standard and the appearance of several WebRTC based implementations.

  • Sick of Flash security holes? HTML5 has its own

    HTML5 has been billed as the natural, standards-based successor to proprietary plug-ins such as Adobe's Flash Player for providing rich multimedia services on the Web. But when it comes to security, one of Flash's major weaknesses, HTML5 is no panacea.

  • Why R? The pros and cons of the R language

    The R programming language is an important tool for <a href="http://www.infoworld.com/article/2922073/analytics/how-to-put-the-r-programming-language-to-work.html">development in the numeric analysis and machine learning spaces.</a> With machines becoming more important as data generators, the popularity of the language can only be expected to grow. But R has both pros and cons that developers should know.

  • Does Fortinet's Meru buy mean we're in for even more Wi-Fi industry consolidation?

    Cybersecurity firm <a href="http://www.fortinet.com/press_releases/2015/fortinet-announces-agreement-to-acquire-meru-networks.html">Fortinet's purchase last week of wireless network manufacturer Meru Networks</a> for $44 million is the second major acquisition of a Wi-Fi hardware vendor in three months and, potentially, the start of a broader pattern.

  • First look: Couchbase's new SQL for NoSQL

    Couchbase might seem like a bit of an outsider in the world of NoSQL datastores. After all, MongoDB grabs most of the limelight, while Cassandra and HBase have sewn up most of the big data world, and Redis has pretty much supplanted Memcache as the key/value cache that people reach for by default. But Couchbase has not been sitting on the sidelines looking in. You might not know it from Hacker News, but the use of Couchbase Server has been growing steadily for the past couple of years.

  • Android Pay likely at Google I/O as Samsung preps its own service

    Google is expected to reveal details about Android Pay at its annual I/O conference this week, even as Samsung readies its own separate mobile payment service.

  • Java at 20: How it changed programming forever

    Remembering what the programming world was like in 1995 is no easy task. Object-oriented programming, for one, was an accepted but seldom practiced paradigm, with much of what passed as so-called object-oriented programs being little more than rebranded C code that used >> instead of printf and class instead of struct. The programs we wrote those days routinely dumped core due to pointer arithmetic errors or ran out of memory due to leaks. Source code could barely be ported between different versions of Unix. Running the same binary on different processors and operating systems was crazy talk.

  • Java at 20: Its successes, failures, and future

    Although Java was developed at Sun Microsystems, Oracle has served as the platform's steward since acquiring Sun in early 2010. During that time, Oracle has released Java 7 and Java 8, with version 9 due up next year. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke to Oracle's Georges Saab, vice president of software development for the Java Platform Group, about the occasion of Java's 20th anniversary.