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  • IBM's IICE heats up content federation

    It's an undeniable problem. Many IT sites lack uniform access to unstructured data locked away in ECMSes (enterprise content management systems), workflow software, and other repositories. Data in these systems is frequently accessible only through the vendors' proprietary interfaces, and so federating it is difficult.

  • Multicore technology works for IBM server

    Multicore technology pays off for IBM with its 326m server. Cramming as many dual-core Advanced Micro Devices Opteron processors into the smallest space possible, the eServer 326m provides enormous amounts of CPU muscle.

  • IBM unleashes 3U power on the enterprise

    IBM continues to produce new servers that deliver greater value. The new xSeries 365 is clearly the next step in IBM's strategy, offering more performance, convenience, and scalability in a smaller package than its predecessor. The result is a server that can meet nearly any imaginable departmental need and fit well into many enterprise applications that once required more expensive servers and more resources to operate.

  • IBM enters enterprise search fray

    With the proliferation of electronic documents and the archival pressures that various industry regulations have been exerting on companies, enterprise search has become an important IT requirement during the past few years. Many search solutions -- including search appliances and more-robust, federated search engines, such as those from IBM and Verity -- have come to market recently to meet the demand. Specialty products such as Vivisimo Velcocity fill additional niches.

  • IBM hits sweet 16

    Sometimes, size does matter. Take servers. Some applications - Web hosting, file/print, domain control, firewalls - don't require a huge amount of horsepower or the utmost in high-availability hardware because it's easy to build clusters.

  • Unisys: Who Knew?

    Unless you're already a customer, I'll bet one of the last places you'd think of checking for multi-vendor storage management tools is Unisys, best known as a server supplier. But it turns out that the company does play in this space, and it may be worth a look if you're in this market.

  • Listen to your customers

    Good business requires that employees and customers both have easy access to information. Implementing today's Internet-based tools and devices, however, isn't always the most effective or convenient way to accomplish the task. To better assure access to your company's vital data, IBM has enhanced the WebSphere e-business platform with the release of WebSphere Voice Server 1.5, dramatically improving the thin-client capabilities of a standard telephone.

  • Installers ease app distribution pains

    If your company uses different platforms and OSes, it can be difficult to standardize on any one installation method. Many developers simply don't have time to create reliable installers.

  • Jtest ported to Linux

    Testing is a fundamental component of the software development process -- or at least it should be. As a developer, I know firsthand how difficult it can be to discipline oneself to test as you develop. Honestly, testing can be downright boring.

  • Rebel code-breakers storm the gates

    Linux is alive and well. For all those devotees frustrated at the cult open-source code's painfully slow adoption by the masses, Glyn Moody's magnificent book, Rebel Code, restores faith that its heart still beats strongly. It still believes it can take on the proprietary world and - one day - win.

  • WebSphere keeps e-commerce turning

    In the midst of an economic cooling, it can be pretty difficult to justify updating an existing commerce infrastructure. Nevertheless, IBM Corp.'s WebSphere Commerce Suite Pro 5.1 delivers a solid vehicle for broadening revenue streams by leading global e-initiatives out of the stateside doldrums and across the big blue seas.

  • Watching over Linux

    The growth of Linux in the corporate world has been hobbled by a lack of enterprise-quality network monitoring, management and software distribution tools. Enter Caldera System Inc.'s Volution 1.0, which is designed to make a Linux systems administrator's life much easier.

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