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    Exec: IBM-Google partnership merges top features

    IBM and Google might seem like polar opposites in the world of technology, yet the companies have a budding partnership over cloud computing that seeks to combine the best features of business computing with the Internet. Steve Mills, the senior vice president and group executive for IBM's software business since July 2000, explained the goals of the IBM-Google relationship to Network World Senior Writer Jon Brodkin in an interview this week at IBM's New York City offices. Mills also discussed new opportunities in China, software-as-a-service's impact on the IT market, and the pros and cons of IBM's diversified software portfolio.

  • IBM exec: Information on Demand is coming together

    It's been a bit more than two years since Ambuj Goyal launched IBM's Information on Demand strategy, an effort by the company to bring together a virtual menagerie of data management, access and analysis software under a single heading.

  • Microsoft's Ferguson talks about Oslo, SOA

    Don Ferguson bears what may be a unique distinction. He has the held lofty title of "Fellow," a title associated with being a distinguished technologist, at not only IBM but Microsoft as well. Last year, Ferguson left IBM, where he had participated in development of the company's WebSphere middleware platform, to come to Microsoft. He is a technical fellow in the Microsoft Office of the CTO. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill met with Ferguson at the Microsoft SOA and Business Process in Washington this week to talk about Microsoft, including the company's new Oslo modeling and services project, and IBM.

  • IBM executive explains company's buying spree

    IBM has been on an acquisition spree, having recently snapped up DataMirror, a data management vendor in Markam, Ontario; Princeton Softech, a data archiving company in Princeton, New Jersey; and Watchfire, a Web application security provider in Waltham, Massachusetts. Computerworld US' Thomas Hoffman talked with Deborah Magid, director of software strategy at IBM's Venture Capital Group in Menlo Park, California, about the company's strategy.

  • IBM sticks to autonomic computing agenda

    IBM coined the term autonomic computing in 2001 and since then has been beating the automation drum across its software and hardware product lines. The premise of a self-healing, self-protecting, self-optimizing and self-managing data centre caused some industry watchers to scoff, but Big Blue stuck to its plans and now has about 450 autonomic features shipping in 70 or so IBM products. Now with virtualization, service-oriented architecture (SOA) and other innovative technologies increasing complexity across corporate data centres, IBM says automation is needed more than ever. Ric Telford, vice president of autonomic computing at IBM, recently talked with Denise Dubie to learn more about the state of the company's autonomic initiative.

  • IBM aims to help impaired access video content

    IBM researcher Chieko Asakawa has been blind since she was 14 years old. Since joining IBM in Japan in 1985, she has worked on myriad projects to improve accessibility for the visually impaired. And over the last year, she and a team of four researchers have been working to make it possible for blind and visually impaired users to access multimedia content online, using a keyboard to control media player software.

  • IBM's Handy on managing Linux

    Scott Handy started with IBM in 1983 as a systems engineer and went on to sales, marketing, and strategy positions covering large accounts, channels, small and medium business, and IBM products for Windows NT, Sun Solaris and OS/2 Warp. Now as vice president for Linux and open source he is one of the main public faces articulating IBM's open-source strategy. IDG News Service Senior Writer Elizabeth Montalbano caught up with Handy at the sidelines of the recent LinuxWorld Open Solutions Summit in New York. He talked about how the industry giant manages to support a vast product portfolio for Linux and open-source initiatives.

  • Zend hails PHP for Microsoft, IBM

    Zend Technologies is perhaps the first name in PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor), the popular open-source scripting language for Web development. The company both participates in development of PHP and offers products around the server-side development platform. Andi Gutmans, a cofounder of the company and its vice president of technology, spoke with Paul Krill this week at the Zend/PHP Conference & Expo in California about PHP, the company's blockbuster deal with Microsoft, and other happenings.

  • ISS founder on IBM and beyond

    Internet Security Systems (ISS) last week entered an agreement to be acquired by IBM for US$1.3 billion in cash, a deal expected to close by the end of the year. Chris Klaus, founder and chief security advisor at ISS, talks about what he plans to do next -- and it could involve an online virtual world he hopes you'll visit, too.

  • IBM offers prototype for creating mashups

    IBM earlier this month brought out a prototype technology that uses Web services and wiki technology to quickly build customized "mashup" applications that can blend external information, like news feeds and weather reports, with enterprise content and services. IBM defines mashups as applications that use open technologies such as Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX), PHP scripting language and syndicated feeds to combine content from more than one source into a single application. In an interview with Computerworld after the announcement, Rod Smith, IBM's vice president of emerging Internet technologies, talked about the genesis of the prototype, called Enterprise Mashup, and how IBM expects to use the new technology.

  • IBM's Zollar touts new management products

    IBM is announcing that the IBM Change and Configuration Management Database (CCMDB) will ship June 30, along with three Process Manager tools. IBM calls the CCMDB a kind of command center for automatic discovery of IT information on servers, applications, storage and network devices and software across an enterprise. Al Zollar, general manager for Tivoli Software at IBM for the past two years, discussed the upcoming releases -- as well as the evolution and importance of management products to customers -- with Computerworld.

  • IBM executive touts mainframe security

    Jim Stallings is two months into his job as general manager of IBM's mainframe System z division. In an interview this week with Computerworld's Patrick Thibodeau, Stallings mapped out some of his plans, including security, the training of 20,000 mainframe workers by 2010 and the prospect of new specialty processors.

  • IBM's Jim Stallings sees mainframe growth

    Jim Stallings, the new general manager of IBM's mainframe System z division, is settling into his job by promising 100 customer visits in his first 100 days. He's been on the job for two months and in an interview this week mapped out some of his plans, including increased automation of security, the training of 20,000 workers in mainframe skills before 2010 and the prospect of new specialty processors.

  • Linux branching out, says IBM exec

    Adam Jollans, Linux strategy manager for IBM, discusses how he sees Linux adoption evolving across vertical industries and in businesses both small and large, and how IBM is adapting its own Linux strategy to mesh with those trends.

  • IBM exec: Too much data creates problems

    Steve Mills, senior vice president and group executive for software at IBM, thinks that the supercomputing-like capabilities of new hardware, coupled with improvements in software, are making it possible for companies to integrate and process data on an enormous scale. But the data management problems facing IT managers are also huge, Mills said in an interview with Computerworld. He talked about the company's planned US$1 billion investment in data management services, announced last week.

  • IBM Exec Sees Open-Source Interest Growing

    Bob Sutor, IBM's vice president of standards and open-source, sees 2006 as the year when a number of industries will move to embrace open-source software -- and he expects IBM to play a role in many of those efforts. Sutor, who spoke with Computerworld Monday, also weighed in on the role of Linux and offered his thoughts on Massachusetts' OpenDocument plans.

  • IBM's exec sees 'tidal wave of data' coming

    Andrew Monshaw, general manager of IBM's Storage Systems and Technology Group for the past year, spoke with Computerworld about a variety of storage issues. He said he sees no end in sight for tape storage because of its value proposition, feels that virtualization is king and is still unsure where Microsoft's venture into storage is headed. Monshaw also said the open-source software development group Aperi, formed in October with eight other vendors, should produce the first version of a common storage management platform by mid-2006. That platform is designed to allow users to manage storage systems from multiple vendors through a single interface.

  • SCO CEO on IBM lawsuit, plans

    The critics have been harsh on The SCO Group since it claimed ownership of pieces of Linux in recent years via lawsuits and threatened legal action. Darl McBride, president and CEO of SCO, talked with Computerworld during the SCO Forum in Las Vegas this week about the state of SCO and about its future -- whether it wins or loses its legal battles.

  • IBM's Clementi touts new mainframe

    Erich Clementi, the general manager of IBM systems who is also in charge of the company's mainframe efforts, discussed some of the features of IBM's z9 mainframe, which was announced last week. The z9 represents IBM's biggest mainframe upgrade in nearly three years, cost US$1.2 billion to develop and doubles the performance over its predecessor to 1 billion transactions per day. Those performance improvements notwithstanding, company officials put a particular focus on the z9's security improvements when they unveiled the new system.

  • Sun executive on the StorageTek acquisition

    Mark Canepa, executive vice president of Network Storage Products Group for Sun Microsystems, will be oversee the US$4.3 billion buyout of Storage Technology, and will likely lead the company once it becomes a part of Sun. Canepa spoke with Computerworld about how Sun plans to address StorageTek user concerns around service and support and product synergies.

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