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  • Global privacy advisory market topping $3B

    How much do companies around the world spend each year on data privacy services to fix the problems we read about in the headlines every day? Nobody as far as I can tell has published an answer to this question. So this month I set out to pull together the best available data points on the market.

  • For Linux, Supercomputers R Us

    Supercomputers are serious things, called on to do serious computing. They tend to be engaged in serious pursuits like atomic bomb simulations, climate modeling and high-level physics. Naturally, they cost serious money. At the very top of the latest <a href="http://www.top500.org/">Top500</a> supercomputer ranking is the Tianhe-2 supercomputer at China's National University of Defense Technology. It cost about $390 million to build.

  • New A.I. tech helps you write right

    This column is a little cheerful, slightly analytical, both confident and tentative and just a tiny bit angry. But mostly, it's open, agreeable and conscientious. At least that's what IBM's Watson thinks.

  • Nvidia asks Washington to sledgehammer smartphones

    Today's smartphone is more powerful than a supercomputer of just 20 years ago. It is an immensely complex device. In fact, more than one in six (16%) of all active U.S. patents are smartphone-related. Because of this complexity, smartphones for the last several years have been the epicenter of intellectual property disputes in high technology. Nearly every mobile, software, chip and Internet firm has been involved in some legal battle.

  • The Internet of Growing Things

    Earlier this month, in Monterey, Calif., a meeting organized by the Produce Marketing Association provided an opportunity for a group of local growers of crops such as lettuce, artichokes and strawberries to find out how the latest digital technologies were changing agriculture. Participants heard about how technologies like robots, drones and predictive analytics could help them improve their operations.

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."

  • What is artificial intelligence?

    What is artificial intelligence (AI), and what is the difference between general AI and narrow AI?

  • Career advice: Are government jobs technological backwaters?

    <strong>Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader</strong>

  • 'Parks And Recreation,' Facebook and The New Privacy

    If you tuned into <a href="http://www.avclub.com/tvclub/parks-and-recreation-gryzzlboxsave-jjs-214445">Parks And Recreation Tuesday night</a>, you were treated to an episode where social media startup Gryzzl attempts to win over the hearts and minds of its  new neighbors in the fictional town of Pawnee with boxes full of gifts, delivered via Amazon-esque drones.

  • Career advice: Asking for a raise

    <strong>Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader</strong>

  • The hottest wireless technology is now sound!

    Using sound for transferring data is nothing new. In the 1940s, when IBM tried to solve the problem of how to use regular telephone lines to connect two computers, it figured out a way to convert data into sound, send the sound over the phone and then convert it back into data. (Yes, I'm talking about the modem.)

  • What happens next in the Cisco suit against Arista?

    Arista Networks' stock took it on the chin when Cisco slapped the company with patent infringement and copyright law suits last Friday, losing almost 20% of its value at one point as investors and others mulled the long term implications of the suits.

  • Career advice: When that job you want requires a security clearance

    <strong>Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader</strong>

  • Microsoft awakes

    We may be witnessing the beginning of a turnaround for one of the mainstay companies of the IT industry: Microsoft. And by turnaround, I don't mean financially. Microsoft is a prodigious revenue and profit generator. But the company has been rudderless for years. It has essentially been reactive, not an industry leader. It's been resting on its laurels.

  • Career advice: 'Retired' just looks wrong on a résumé

    Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader

  • SDN and Network Virtualization: A Reality Check

    The Software Defined Networking movement is still evolving, but profiles of SDN users are becoming more clear and we're getting a bead on some of the common evaluation criteria companies are using to gauge how to go forward. We also have a sense of when companies expect to start the process in earnest.

  • Career advice: A plan for battling organizational politics

    Premier 100 IT Leader Karen Sullivan also answers questions on the value of undergraduate degrees and MBAs.

  • How to make intelligent flash storage investment decisions

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • The Apple/IBM deal: iOS claims the IoT

    The partnership announced last week isn't just about selling more iPhones. It's part of a big push into the Internet of Things.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

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