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  • OpenDaylight Executive Director spells out where this open source SDN efforts stands

    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is the public face of the Software Defined Networking movement, spelling out requirements and defining standards. The group's board includes Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Microsoft and Goldman Sachs on the data center side, and Verizon, Deutsche Telekom and NTT Communications on the service provider side. Additionally, there are close to 150 members, from global telcos to startups. To get a sense of where the movement stands, Network World Editor in Chief John Dix tracked down ONF Executive Director Dan Pitt, who spent 20 years developing network architecture, technology, standards, and products at IBM Networking Systems, Hewlett Packard and Bay Networks.

  • Open Networking foundation (ONF) Executive Director on the group's achievements, goals

    OpenDaylight is a Linux Foundation Collaborative project that is building an Open Source SDN controller. To find out how the effort is going Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Neela Jacques, who joined the OpenDaylight project last November as Executive Director.

  • The future of networking is a NOS on your choice of bare metal, says Cumulus Networks

    If Cumulus Networks has its way, companies will use its Cumulus Linux to decouple the network operating system from the hardware and break free of the integrated approach that has driven the industry for decades. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix talked about the vision with Co-Founder and CEO JR Rivers.

  • Q&A: 3D gun maker Cody Wilson defends freedom to print guns

    Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, contests claims his 3D printed gun isn't safe and will try to continue to make 3D gun plans available.

  • Healthcare provider finds SDN is the proper Rx

    William Hanna, vice president of technical services at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), went out looking for a way to add capacity to a backup network and found what he wanted in Software Defined Networking (SDN) tools from Alcatel-Lucent. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix sat down with Hanna to learn about the process and experience.

  • Competing on multiple fronts helps Broadcom, CEO McGregor says

    Broadcom got a jump on Mobile World Congress this week, announcing two steps forward in its fledgling LTE silicon business. On Monday, the company introduced a turnkey solution for LTE smartphones to be priced under US$300. On Tuesday, it announced a test, on a live carrier network in Finland, of a high-end handset chip that can use so-called Category 6 LTE with speeds as high as 300Mbps (bits per second).

  • Mobile chip speed wars have to end, Broadcom chairman says

    The chip industry is in for major changes in the coming years, according to Broadcom Chairman and Chief Technical Officer, Henry Samueli.

  • Cloud computing causing rethinking of disaster recovery

    Cloud computing gives organisations the opportunity to rethink many traditional IT practices, but it may be a particularly good fit for disaster recovery and business continuity.

  • SDN: The user view

    It is still early days in the emergence of software defined networking, so there aren't many users around to share their experiences and expectations, but there are a few. Network World's editor in chief tracked down Steve Wallace, executive director of InCNTRE, Indiana University's Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education, which is already using the technology in a production environment. The school is also playing a role in the tech's evolution.

  • Google making steady progress in the enterprise

    Google Enterprise is making inroads on many fronts, winning converts to everything from its productivity tools to its cloud offerings. We recently caught up with President of Google Enterprise, Amit Singh, for a progress report and to discuss what comes next.

  • Interview: Dell software chief talks transformation

    John Swainson has one of the more challenging jobs in the tech industry right now. As president of Dell's software division, he's charged with sorting through all the software Dell has acquired and organizing it into coherent offerings that can further its effort to become a more profitable, software- and services-driven company.

  • UEFI president: We need more key providers

    Since its introduction, the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface has created a fair amount of controversy. UEFI was created through an industry consortium as an evolutionary step up from BIOS, the simple firmware long used when starting a computer to initialize all the components and load the operating system. Among its advanced features, UEFI includes an option called Secure Boot, which requires that any software used before the operating system starts, or after it shuts down, has been signed by a certificate authority.

  • MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor on implications of 'the mobile wave'

    MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor's big interest these days is "the mobile wave," which refers to a re-ordering of technology and modern life through the proliferation of iPads, smartphones and the increasingly sophisticated software that runs on them.

  • Intel/McAfee: What's the future of security?

    Intel completed its multibillion-dollar acquisition of McAfee almost a year and a half ago, and this week McAfee co-President Mike DeCesare spoke with Network World senior editor Ellen Messmer about what the merger of Intel's chip-making capabilities and McAfee's security expertise is expected to bring down the road.

  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst weighs in on strategy, Oracle and growth

    Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst is coming up on his five-year anniversary at the helm, following his arrival in December 2007. Under Whitehurst's leadership, Red Hat's revenue has grown from US$523 million in its fiscal 2008 to more than $1.1 billion in its fiscal 2012, without deviating from its core strategy of open-source infrastructure software.

  • 10 questions for ownCloud CFO Dan Curtis

    Name: Dan Curtis

  • Hitachi GST CEO claims hard drive future hangs in Cloud

    In March, Western Digital agreed to buy Hitachi Global Storage Technologies> (HGST), the disk drive subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd., in a stock and cash transaction valued at $US4.3 billion. HGST CEO Steve Milligan will join WD as president at the closing of the deal, expected in the fourth quarter.

  • CIO Rebecca Jacoby steers Cisco's IT ship

    Running the internal IT operations of Cisco Systems is a big job not just because of the size of the company -- more than 70,000 employees worldwide and a market capitalisation in the range of $US100 billion -- but also because Cisco is continually developing new IT products across a broad range of technologies and is known for rapidly adopting those products for its own use. Cisco CIO Rebecca Jacoby spoke with IDG News Service on the sidelines of the NetWork conference last week and shared some insights into the legendary enterprise IT company's own enterprise IT.

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    How do they do IT? Avatar's special effects

    The motion picture, Avatar, is breaking box office records around the world, redefining the cinematic experience along the way. So how does the IT work?

  • Sydney Uni takes virtual course to central IT

    Following a long IT career in the financial services sector, two and half years ago Bruce Meikle joined Australia’s first higher education and research institution, the University of Sydney, as CIO.