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  • The 3D TV fad is already over

    3D television programming may be out before it was ever in, according to industry analysts. In fact, the BBC just cancelled its 3D programming indefinitely.

  • Worst -- and best -- IT interview questions

    Why are manhole covers round? Why do you ask? Tech managers weigh in on the practice of using brainteasers to screen IT candidates and share their own favorite interview questions.

  • Driverless cars yield to reality: It's a long road ahead

    Take a drive on Highway 101 between Silicon Valley and San Francisco these days and you might see one of Google's driverless cars in the lane next to you. The vehicles are one of the most visible signs of the increasing amount of research going on in the area related to automated driving technology.

  • The promise of software defined networking

    If you aren't intimately familiar with software defined networking, don't fret. Only 10 per cent of 450 IT practitioners at a recent Network World event raised their hands when asked if they understand SDN. But if the emerging technology lives up to its promise to redefine networking as we know it, there is no time like the present to dig in and learn more.

  • How will Cloud, virtualisation and SDN complicate future firewall security?

    The firewall in decades past was mainly the port-based guardian of the Internet. Now vendors are vying to build so-called "next-generation firewalls" that are "application-aware" because they can monitor and control access based on application use.

  • Oracle's Q4 results: What to watch for

    Many eyes in the tech world will fall on Oracle later this week, when the vendor's fourth-quarter results are set for release. This is typically the biggest reporting period for Oracle each year in terms of revenue, but a number of questions loom beyond its top-line performance.

  • China likely to become No. 1 in supercomputing this week

    China has produced a supercomputer capable of 54.9 petaflops that will likely be recognized as the world's fastest system this week with the unveiling of a new Top500 list.

  • NSA whistleblower likely had easy access to classified data

    A defiant Edward Snowden resurfaced in Hong Kong today vowing to fight any U.S. efforts to extradite him on charges that he leaked classified documents describing two secret government data collection programs.

  • Google execs talk China, privacy, betting big

    At Google's annual shareholders' meeting, company executives talked about censorship in China, Glass privacy issues and the need to bet big to win big

  • Salesforce.com aims for next $1 billion business with ExactTarget buy

    Salesforce.com's pending US$2.5 billion purchase of marketing software vendor ExactTarget will help it develop a new $1 billion annual revenue stream and set the company on a clear strategic course for the foreseeable future, according to Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff.

  • How to build a private cloud

    A private Cloud looks and acts like a public Cloud, giving your corporation all the speed, agility and cost savings promised by Cloud technology, only it's single-tenant, and that tenant is you, right? Well, that's the goal, but it's not quite the reality yet for most enterprises.

  • 5 tips for avoiding private cloud failures

    According to Piston Cloud Computing's CTO, the rate at which his customer's pilot projects turn into production private clouds is pretty typical of most OpenStack-based providers – and it's pretty low.

  • Stack wars: OpenStack v. CloudStack v. Eucalyptus

    OpenStack -- co-founded by Rackspace and NASA in 2010 -- certainly has the buzz, what with partnerships with AT&T, HP and IBM, to name a few, all of which have promised to use OpenStack as the base for their private cloud offerings.

  • Tornadoes and data centers are OK in Oklahoma

    If the question about tornadoes comes up at his Oklahoma City data center, as it sometimes does, Todd Currie, vice president of operations and general manager at Perimeter Technology, has answers. He even has cutout sample of his roof to show how it is built.

  • Smacking SharePoint into shape

    More than half of all SharePoint shops have had to add functionality to the core software, which came as a surprise to a number of them. Here's what they're doing.

  • You'll want a PC with Intel's new chip for the battery life alone

    Intel's latest chip, the 4th generation Core processor code-named Haswell, will take a 6-hour battery and make it last for 9 hours.

  • Remote controls get pointless as radio frequency gains popularity

    The use of radio frequency tech in remote controls for everything from smart TVs and BluRay players to gaming devices will see a huge uptick compared with infrared-based controls.

  • Google Glass breaks into business

    Like the tablet market, Google Glass may currently be viewed as a consumer product but it will soon be seen on the faces of IT and mobile employees.

  • Despite Schmidt's timeline, Google may ship Glass in 2013

    Just a month after a top Google executive said Glass wouldn't be officially released for another year, sources say the computerized eyeglasses actually should ship by the end of this year.

  • Immigration reform may spur software robotics

    The Senate immigration bill's H-1B restrictions have clearly upset Indian firms. But sometimes being in a tough spot can prompt new ways of approaching problems. One firm is implementing software robots.