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  • Microsoft: What it did right and wrong in 2012

    At the time of writing, Windows 8 could be the biggest thing Microsoft has done wrong -- ever. But it could also wind up being one of the best things it has ever done.

  • The scariest US software project horror stories of 2012

    Sure, plenty of enterprise software projects go just fine and end up giving customers all the things vendors promise: lower operating costs, streamlined operations and happier users.

  • Dell's acquisitions not yet paying dividends

    Dell's effort to move away from PCs into enterprise products has been slow as the company battles a challenging economy and tries to weave together acquisitions in a coherent manner.

  • ARM's big.LITTLE processors and 1080p screens await smartphone buyers in 2013

    Smartphone vendors will rely on upgrades such as full-HD screens and more powerful yet more frugal processors to entice customers to buy new phones in 2013.

  • Tablet smackdown: iPad vs Surface RT in the enterprise

    IPads are already making their way into businesses via bring-your-own-device efforts with Microsoft Surface RT tablets hoping to follow suit as employees lobby for their favorite devices. But which one makes more sense from an IT perspective?

  • HP's woes persist as Autonomy deal goes bad

    Hewlett-Packard vows to 'aggressively' seek recompense for alleged fraud on the part of U.K. software vendor Autonomy, which HP acquired in a $US10.3 billion deal last year.

  • 2013: Year of the hybrid cloud

    The time for dabbling in cloud computing is over, say industry analysts. 2013 is the year that companies need to implement a hybrid cloud strategy that puts select workloads in the public cloud and keeps others in-house.

  • Opinion: I want a military smartphone

    The U.S. military wants to put smartphones in the hands of all deployed troops. Their phones are going to be better than regular smartphones, says Mike Elgan, and that's why he wants one.

  • In a symbolic shift, IBM's India workforce likely exceeds U.S.

    It has been widely expected over the past year or two that IBM's India workforce was on track to exceed its U.S. workforce, if it hadn't exceeded it already.

  • Bye-bye, mouse. Hello, mind control

    When workplace computers moved beyond command-line interfaces to the mouse-and-windows-based graphical user interface, that was a major advance in usability. And the command line itself was a big improvement over the punch cards and tape that came before.

  • Women in IT: How deep is the bench?

    Superstar women lead IT at some of the biggest global corporations, yet the path to the top isn't clear for the next generation.

  • Hurricane Sandy leaves wounded servers in its wake

    Data recovery experts have been kept busy in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which left a slew of data centers underwater, damaging equipment and threatening a significant loss of business-critical data.

  • Europe looks to ARM chips for supercomputing edge

    The European Union is moving to build a high-performance computing industry to challenge U.S. dominance, but it doesn't want to play catch-up. It wants to leapfrog, and it is seeing whether ARM Holdings technology can give it that edge.

  • Four takeaways from Cisco's Q1

    Four things are clear from Cisco’s better-than-expected Q1 FY 2013 results:

  • The TV is the new tablet: How gesture-based computing is evolving

    Few people watch television alone today, even when they're by themselves. Most are gravitating toward the multi-screen experience, in which viewers keep a smartphone, tablet or laptop close by so they can access the Web while they watch TV. But as televisions become smarter and gesture-based computing evolves, viewers may be able to mount and control everything they need on the living room wall.

  • High-performance computing turns to apps to cut cost and frustration

    Steve Jobs was right about apps in more ways than perhaps he ever knew. The concept of using apps to make software easily available and affordable to large numbers is arriving in high performance computing.

  • After a tough year, Intel and HP push ahead on Itanium

    It has been a rough stretch for Itanium. HP and its customers were startled after Oracle abruptly announced its intent to discontinue software development on HP's Itanium servers. But neither HP nor Intel has backed away from Itanium, and last week's announcements appear to affirm that.

  • Most memorable tech industry apologies of 2012: From Apple to Google to Microsoft

    Tech vendors have been as bombastic as ever promoting the magical and amazing things their latest smartphones, cloud computing wares and network gear can do. When things go wrong, they're naturally a little less visible, but plenty of companies have sucked it up and done the right thing this year (perhaps with a little legal prodding here and there) and publicly apologized for minor and major customers inconveniences.

  • Samsung laying groundwork for server chips, analysts say

    Samsung's recent licensing of 64-bit processor designs from ARM suggests that the chip maker may expand from smartphones and tablets into the server market, analysts said this week.

  • Opinion: The new Microsoft

    Microsoft seems to have gotten its groove back, putting forward a hip, Apple-esque branding effort for the Windows 8 products that reflects new energy in Redmond.