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  • Thanks to the NSA, quantum computing may some day be in the cloud

    The NSA is spending some $80 million in basic research on quantum computing, money that may ultimately help commercialize quantum computing for the private sector.

  • The firm behind Healthcare.gov had top-notch credentials -- and it didn't help

    CGI Federal, the lead contractor at Healthcare.gov, is a veritable black belt in software development, with the highest possible certification from CMMI. So what does the website's flawed rollout say about how useful CMMI is?

  • The first 3D printed organ -- a liver -- is expected in 2014

    Bio-printing companies and academics are finally having success keeping 3D printed human tissue alive long enough to use it for drug development and testing. It could be used for human implants someday.

  • Mindspeed acquisition fuels Intel's hopes for bigger network role

    Intel's acquisition of mobile network assets from silicon vendor Mindspeed Technologies will give the chip giant what it needs to extend the Intel architecture throughout mobile operator networks, helping the carriers upgrade hardware and roll out new services more quickly, according to Intel.

  • Bringing brains to computers

    For decades, scientists have fantasized about creating robots with brain-like intelligence. This year, researchers tempted by that dream made great progress on achieving what has been called the holy grail of computing.

  • Microsoft bets on Windows XP disaster

    Microsoft today used the hoary practice of predicting next year to drive another nail into Windows XP's coffin.

  • 4 ideas to steal from IT upstarts

    Fast-growing companies like Square and MongoDB are driving IT innovation with leaner staffs, cloud-first computing, self-service everything and CTOs rather than CIOs.

  • Dell's Chromebook is a sign of shakier times for Windows

    Dell's debut of a Chromebook, an inexpensive laptop that runs Google's browser-based Chrome OS, is a sign that the platform has gone mainstream, an analyst argued today.

  • Top tech stories of 2013: Big Brother, wearables, and the struggles of aging tech giants

    Politics collided with the world of technology this year as stories about U.S. government spying stirred angst both among the country's citizens and foreign governments, and the flawed HeathCare.gov site got American health-care reform off to a rocky start. Meanwhile, the post-PC era put aging tech giants under pressure to reinvent themselves. Here in no particular order are IDG News Service's picks for the top 10 tech stories of the year.

  • Employers receptive to hiring IT job candidates with MOOC educations

    Tyler Kresch isn't turning to graduate school to help him change his job from tech sales to running a startup; instead he's taking massive open online courses (MOOCs) to learn the IT skills necessary for that career move.

  • Why smartphone food photos look horrible

    Martha Stewart wants to show you horrible pictures of nauseating-looking food for some reason. Mike Elgan finds this personally vexing.

  • Why you shouldn't buy a 4K TV this year

    While you may be tempted to head out this holiday season to buy an Ultra-High Definition 4K TV, industry experts warn against it, saying the best HD TVs will provide you with a better picture for todays broadcast content.

  • How to extract custom data from Google Analytics

    Not happy with the Google Analytics interface? We show you how to use a programming language like R to bypass Google Analytics and retrieve the data you want.

  • Gift Guide 2013: Phones, tablets and computers

    In the past, we used to separate out categories for cell phones, tablets and computers. In theory, we still could create separate guides just for those products - there are so many options to choose from and not a week goes by where another phone, tablet or computer hits the market.

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    IT hiring goes multimedia

    IT job seekers embrace social media, video and graphics to enhance their resumes and set themselves apart from other job applicants.

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    Google Apps, once a leader, faces growing Cloud app rivals

    When Google Apps arrived in 2006, it stood on the cutting edge of Web-hosted email and collaboration suites for businesses, a bold pioneer clearing a path in the new, wild frontier of enterprise Cloud computing.

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    Is technology the cause of car crashes? Or the cure?

    Passing laws to minimise accidents caused by distracted drivers is a good idea. But let's not dump advanced technology prematurely just because we assume it's a distraction, says Mike Elgan.

  • What's Wrong With Healthcare.gov's Price Estimator

    In the early days of Healthcare.gov, I praised the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for publishing a dataset with sample rates for every health plan participating in the federal health insurance marketplace.

  • Predictive policing gets personal

    Some localities are shying away from predicting who will commit a crime, even though the technology exists, in favor of when and where.

  • Microsoft Word: At 30, the word processing package is king, but threats abound

    It is 30 years old and dominates the word processing market, but Microsoft Word is now more than ever fending off challenges from the cloud where less expensive and even free alternatives pose new threats, experts say.

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