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  • Standards are coming for containers

    A list of leading cloud, storage and virtualization companies are backing a new effort named the Open Container Project, which aims to create a set of standards for the fast-growing technology.

  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

  • The No. 1 midsize place to work in IT: Credit Acceptance

    Six months after arriving at Credit Acceptance Corp. as a contract tech support analyst, Chris Thomas hired on as a full-time employee. He hasn't looked back.

  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.

  • How we chose the Best Places to Work in IT 2015

    For the 22nd year in a row, Computerworld conducted a survey to identify the 100 best places to work for IT professionals. As we first did in 2014, this year we once again present the top organization data sorted by size.

  • Tour the three No. 1 Best Places

    Competition was fierce this year to determine Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT. In a white-hot jobs market, organizations are pulling out the stops to attract and retain talented, visionary tech workers.

  • Top firms for training, retention, benefits and career development

    Organizations make it onto Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT list by excelling in training, benefits, retention and career development, among other attributes.

  • Tech Media Watch: HBO's "Silicon Valley" set to wrap 2nd season – it won't be "Game Of Thrones"-esque but it'll do

    The far-and-away best satire of the technology industry on TV airs the last episode of its second season Sunday night, and you really should be watching. Silicon Valley has continued to bring the funny throughout the second set of episodes, and the finale looks like it's leading up to a fairly insane climax.

  • Migrating to the cloud? Start with a readiness assessment

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • 9 hot enterprise storage companies to watch

    Amidst all the venture investments this year in startups that generate gobs of data -- from those focused on everything from apps to drones to the Internet of Things to Big Data -- are a batch of newcomers aiming to help organizations store and access all that information. Yes, storage companies are pulling in big bucks in 2015, as they did in 2014, and a couple have even double-dipped this year and announced two rounds of funding.

  • Hot skills alert: Tips for landing a plum project manager's job

    Karen Klein had a typical entrance into the project management profession, evolving into the role after working her way up the IT ranks.

  • 5 reasons you should move your video to specialty storage

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Does Fortinet's Meru buy mean we're in for even more Wi-Fi industry consolidation?

    Cybersecurity firm Fortinet's purchase last week of wireless network manufacturer Meru Networks for $44 million is the second major acquisition of a Wi-Fi hardware vendor in three months and, potentially, the start of a broader pattern.

  • Java at 20: Its successes, failures, and future

    Although Java was developed at Sun Microsystems, Oracle has served as the platform's steward since acquiring Sun in early 2010. During that time, Oracle has released Java 7 and Java 8, with version 9 due up next year. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke to Oracle's Georges Saab, vice president of software development for the Java Platform Group, about the occasion of Java's 20th anniversary.

  • Java at 20: The JVM, Java's other big legacy

    Think of Java, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this week, and your first thoughts most likely go to the language itself. But underneath the language is a piece of technology that has a legacy at least as important and powerful as Java itself: the Java virtual machine, or JVM.

  • Java at 20: The programming juggernaut rolls on

    What began as an experiment in consumer electronics in the early 1990s celebrates its 20th anniversary as a staple of enterprise computing this week. Java has become a dominant platform, able to run wherever the Java Virtual Machine is supported, forging ahead despite the rise of rival languages and recent tribulations with security.

  • How the 2015 Computerworld IT Salary Survey was conducted

    The 29th annual Computerworld IT Salary Survey was administered via the Internet. Both Computerworld digital magazine subscribers and visitors to Computerworld.com were included in the survey.

  • IT careers: Security talent is red-hot

    From the time he was 9, Daniel Kowalski, now 23, knew cybersecurity was going to be his thing. Captivated by the stealth work of hackers in commercials and in his favorite movie, Live Free or Die Hard, Kowalski nurtured his fascination with security from a young age, pursuing multiple IT and security certifications during high school and earning a degree in computer criminology at Florida State University.

  • In hot jobs market, IT workers call the shots

    Like many of his colleagues, MIS director Bill Jones is in the market for IT talent. Jones, who runs the IT department for the city of Port St. Lucie, Fla., needs two developers to fill new positions created to build and maintain a permitting app, plus someone for another new position tasked with installing and maintaining a telephone system.