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  • First Docker, now Mesos: Windows broadens its support in containers

    Microsoft teams with Mesosphere, making Windows servers easier to manage and broadening Azure's appeal

  • Red Hat should double down on containers

    As Red Hat homes in on VMware, investing development resources in Kubernetes, Project Atomic, and other container-related efforts will pay off far more than propping up OpenStack

  • SharePoint 2016: The future is hybrid

    The on-premises collaboration server will increasingly rely on, or encourage the use of, cloud services

  • The Cloud gets mobile apps moving

    Immediately after Hurricane Sandy tore through New York City in October 2012, city officials needed a quick way to show the damage that had been done to streets and infrastructure.

  • Hacking Team gives us incontrovertible proof of targeted mobile threats

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • The six pillars of Next Generation Endpoint Protection

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • Network infrastructure cost optimization services can save millions

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • OpenStack is redefining the business model for data solutions

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Three critical considerations when optimizing infrastructure for application performance

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • Final Windows 10 upgrade forecast sees OS on 440M PCs by early '17

    By February 2017, Microsoft should have Windows 10 on more than 440 million personal computers, according to a new analysis of user share data and upgrade tempo.

  • Technology, the law, and you: BYOD

    <em>(First in an occasional series about technology and the law.)</em>

  • Replace your NAS with cloud storage: the 8 key requirements

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Let users choose enterprise cloud applications

    <em>This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.</em>

  • The top 10 supercomputers in the world, 20 years ago

    In 1995, the top-grossing film in the U.S. was Batman Forever. (Val Kilmer as Batman, Jim Carrey as the Riddler, Tommy Lee Jones as Two-Face. Yeah.) The L.A. Rams were moving back to St. Louis, and Michael Jordan was moving back to the Bulls. Violence was rife in the Balkans. The O.J. trial happened.

  • SDN: The emerging reality

    Change is still afoot in Software Defined Networking, but it is now at least clear that SDN is here to stay, that SDN will be the way we build networks going forward. In this Network World Spotlight special report, pulled together by the editors of Network World, we analyze key developments and gauge where organizations stand today in their SDN planning.

  • Read CW's new July digital magazine!

    <a href="http://resources.idgenterprise.com/original/AST-0146906_Computerworld_July_2015.pdf">Download</a> the Computerworld Digital Magazine!

  • Standards are coming for containers

    A list of leading cloud, storage and virtualization companies are backing a new effort named the Open Container Project, which aims to create a set of standards for the fast-growing technology.

  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

  • The No. 1 midsize place to work in IT: Credit Acceptance

    Six months after arriving at Credit Acceptance Corp. as a contract tech support analyst, Chris Thomas hired on as a full-time employee. He hasn't looked back.

  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.