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  • Signs that IBM may be preparing for a round of job cuts

    IBM tries to keep its layoffs out of the public eye as much as possible, although it fails miserably at this. The company took the unusual step of denying that it was on the cusp of a gigantic layoff amid reports of a possible new round of job cuts that may begin this week.

  • Is the ASUS X205 Microsoft's Chromebook killer?

    The ASUS X205 is one of three Windows 8.1 notebooks, all released in November, designed to halt the encroachment of Chromebooks into the low-end Windows notebook market. (The other two are the HP Stream 11 and HP Stream 13.)

  • Which mobile data provider is best? (And will you make a switch?)

    What do you use a smartphone for most? For its data, of course. So we set out for the second year in a row to find out which mobile service provider gives you the most comprehensive and reliable data network coverage, the fastest upload and download speeds, and overall, the most bang for the buck.

  • Debunking SSD Myths

      By now everyone is aware of the performance leap offered by solid-state drives (SSDs) compared to hard disk drives (HDDs), but some SSD myths persist. It's time to separate fact from fiction.

  • 10 cool network and computing research projects

    If you think the latest enterprise and consumer network and computer technologies rolling into your data center and being snuck into your offices by end users are advanced, wait until you see what's cooking in the labs at universities and tech companies. Much of well-funded research is aimed at security, simplifying use of current technology and figuring out how to more easily plow through mounds of big data. Here's at peek at 10 projects.

  • The never-ending quest to dethrone email

    Build a better mousetrap, as the cliché has it, and the world will beat a path to your door. That line of thinking has even been applied to the most rudimentary corners of the technology world: standards and protocols that have stuck around for decades, yet viewed as creaky and badly in need of replacement. But few old-guard standards have seen as many pretenders to the throne as the SMTP/POP3/IMAP email triumvirate has. If only someone could come up with an alternative that did everything email did but better, more securely, and with less hassle, wouldn't it be worth it?

  • Premier 100 Alumni, 2000 - 2015

    Our Premier 100 IT Leaders Awards honor individuals who have had a positive impact on their organization through technology. Honored individuals manage internal IT organizations, mentor and motivate their IT teams with interesting challenges, envision innovative solutions to business problems and effectively manage and execute IT strategies. Computerworld's Premier 100 IT Leaders issue, published each year, highlights the accomplishments of the honorees.

  • 2015 IT Data Center Infrastructure Convergence Predictions

    IT infrastructure is constantly riding the often-tumultuous waves of consolidation and separation. A typical example would be the eras of mainframe, open systems, and PC computing. No surprise there. For the past three to five years, server virtualization has been a catalyst for data center consolidation, (even though for the most part, IT has mapped server virtualization initiatives to existing IT infrastructure choices, or dare I say legacy infrastructure).

  • Four ways for IT to connect better with customers

    If you walk by an IT office these days, the only sounds you're likely to hear are the dull whir of laptop fans and the gentle hum of servers -- barely a warm body to be found. The IT staff is on the loose.

  • Big names like Google dominate open-source funding

    Network World's analysis of publicly listed sponsors of 36 prominent open-source non-profits and foundations reveals that the lion's share of financial support for open-source groups comes from a familiar set of names.

  • The 8080 chip at 40: What's next for the mighty microprocessor?

    It came out in 1974 and was the basis of the MITS Altair 8800, for which two guys named Bill Gates and Paul Allen wrote BASIC, and millions of people began to realize that they, too, could have their very own, personal, computer.

  • Will enhanced servers do away with need for switches?

    As more and more servers are virtualized, connections between them are increasingly handled by virtual switches running on the same servers, begging the question, does the top of rack data center network switchultimately get subsumed into the server?

  • IT pro's revitalization guide 2015

    For seasoned and new IT leaders alike, the new year is a good excuse to pause and take stock of your professional and personal progress in our always interesting, always chaotic industry.

  • Decisions, decisions: Choices abound as data center architecture options expand

    When the American Red Cross talks about mission-critical systems, it's referring to the blood supply that helps save lives. The non-profit organization manages 40% of the U.S.'s blood supply, so stability, reliability and tight security are of paramount concern, says DeWayne Bell, vice president of IT infrastructure and engineering.

  • Computerworld's holiday gift guide 2014

    Overwhelmed by another hectic holiday season? Not to worry: We're here to help, with great technology gift suggestions for a range of budgets and tastes.

  • Cisco: See No EVO, Hear No EVO, Speak New Partnerships

    It hasn't been lost on the IT vendor community and IT professionals that Cisco is absent from the VMware EVO:RAIL partner program. With all of the powerhouses participating in the program, you'd think that Cisco would jump right into the mix. Considering Cisco's growth in the server market and the fact that it doesn't currently have its own storage play, this opportunity appears to be ideal for Cisco.

  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • HP turns to 3D printing to revive flagging fortunes

    On top of its decision to split into two companies, Hewlett-Packard's move into 3D printing appears to be an attempt to spur revenues and rekindle a culture of innovation within the company.

  • Microsoft's alt-OS strategy strikes loyalists as class warfare

    Long-time Windows users may feel like second-class citizens as Microsoft continues to push its products and services onto alternate platforms, but the problem will clear up next year, analysts predicted today.

  • How Apple could exploit a forever-free iCloud

    While Google and Microsoft are using large amounts of free cloud storage to sell inexpensive consumer notebooks, Apple has stood above the fray.