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  • Search and rescue group sues FAA over drone use

    A battle for rights to U.S. airspace is brewing between the Federal Aviation Administration and organizations looking to operate small, unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, for commercial and other purposes.

  • How to keep your smartphone (and its data) secure

    In our daily activities, our smartphones increasingly store or access sensitive business and personal data -- not just email, but also financial and medical information, company systems, travel itineraries, etc. Many of us also use smartphones to access cloud data repositories like Dropbox, Evernote, Google Docs, Microsoft OneDrive and Apple iCloud.

  • How Apple's billion dollar sapphire bet will pay off

    Apple is making a billion dollar bet on sapphire as a strategic material for mobile devices such as the iPhone, iPad and perhaps an iWatch. Though exactly what the company plans to do with the scratch-resistant crystal – and when – is still the subject of debate.

  • Cisco announces security service linked with new operations centers

    Cisco today announced Managed Threat Defense, a set of security services for the enterprise that Cisco is providing through two new operations centers to remotely support intrusion-detection, incident response and forensics, among other services.

  • Mysterious malware steals Apple credentials from jailbroken iOS devices

    A malware campaign of yet-to-be-determined origin is infecting jailbroken iPhones and iPads to steal Apple account credentials from SSL encrypted traffic.

  • Verizon: Web apps are the security punching bag of the Internet

    Verizon today issued its annual data-breach investigations report, a study of what happened in 1,367 known cases across dozens of industries in 95 countries last year, and the most common form of attack was breaking in through Web applications.

  • NEC launches face-recognition protection for PCs

    NEC has launched a biometric security program that uses face recognition to unlock access to PCs.

  • With "Baidu Inside," the Chinese firm takes aim at hardware market

    Printers, air quality monitors, and weighing scales aren't exactly in the realm of Baidu, China's largest search engine. But that's starting to change under a new company initiative that seeks to bring Baidu technology to smart devices, including household appliances.

  • Data retention: Just like diamonds, metadata is forever

    Appearing today before a Senate inquiry, law enforcement agencies have confirmed that there is no legal obligation on them to destroy so called 'metadata' gathered from warrantless surveillance.

  • Web apps and point-of-sale were leading hacker targets in 2013, says Verizon

    Web application attacks, cyber-espionage and point-of-sale intrusions were among the top IT security threats in 2013, according to Verizon's latest annual report on data breach investigations.

  • Data breaches on the rise as attacks get more complex

    There were 1361 confirmed data breaches reported worldwide in the first calendar quarter of 2014, up 119 per cent on the 621 breaches during the same period last year, according to Verizon.

  • CloudFlare launches bug bounty program

    CloudFlare started a bug bounty program on Monday, joining a host of companies that are turning to independent security researchers to spot bugs in their network.

  • SEC seeks data on cyber security policies at Wall Street firms

    The Securities and Exchange Commission plans to review the cyber defenses of 50 Wall Street broker-dealers and investment advisers to determine whether they are prepared for potential cyber threats.

  • Aereo court case: Consumer control over TV vs. broadcaster copyrights

    The ability of television viewers to control and watch programs may be at stake when the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a copyright infringement case brought by TV networks against Aereo, a service that streams over-the-air television online.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Virtual machines, real mess

    It started out as a simple call to the help desk from an engineer at one of our major development centers: Phone calls were being dropped. Soon, similar complaints were coming in from other engineers, as well as from sales associates, who said the inability to maintain phone calls was making it difficult to close deals.

  • 3 privacy violations you shouldn't worry about

    In the past few years, the public has been confronted with hitherto unimaginable levels of personal privacy invasions.

  • Most but not all sites have fixed Heartbleed flaw

    The world's top 1,000 websites have been patched to protect their servers against the "Heartbleed" exploit, but up to 2% of the top million were still vulnerable as of last week.

  • Even the most secure cloud storage may not be so secure, study finds

    Some cloud storage providers who hope to be on the leading edge of cloud security adopt a "zero-knowledge" policy in which vendors say it is impossible for customer data to be snooped on. But a recent study by computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University is questioning just how secure those zero knowledge tactics are.

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    Satellite communication systems rife with security flaws, vulnerable to remote hacks

    Security researchers have found that many satellite communication systems have vulnerabilities and design flaws that can let remote attackers intercept, manipulate, block and in some cases take full control of critical communications.

  • Michaels says breach at its stores affected nearly 3M payment cards

    About 2.6 million payment cards at Michaels Stores and another 400,000 at subsidiary Aaron Brothers may have been affected in a card skimming attack that compromised its point-of-sale systems, the retailer said Thursday.

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