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  • CISOs still struggle for respect from peers

    Chief information security officers (CISOs) continue to have a hard time gaining the respect of other C-suite executives despite the heightened focus overall on information security.

  • University researchers develop glasses-free display

    Fumbling around for your near-vision glasses to read the tablet screen? University researchers may have come up with a way to alleviate that problem.

  • Tor hints at possible U.S. government involvement in recent attack

    Hackers attacked the infrastructure of Tor, the anonymizing service, earlier this month in an incident that may have compromised a number of hidden services, according to an announcement posted today by the Tor Project's director, Roger Dingledine.

  • Great privacy essay: Fourth Amendment Doctrine in the Era of Total Surveillance

    When you signed up with your ISP, or with a wireless carrier for mobile devices, if you gave it any thought at all when you signed your name on the contract, you likely didn't expect your activities to be a secret, or to be anonymous, but how about at least some degree of private? Is that reasonable? No, as the law currently suggests that as a subscriber, you "volunteer" your personal information to be shared with third-parties. Perhaps not the content of your communications, but the transactional information that tells things like times, places, phone numbers, or addresses; transactional data that paints a very clear picture of your life and for which no warrant is required.

  • IBM buys access control and identity management firm CrossIdeas

    IBM has added to its security software portfolio with the purchase of Italian access control and identity management firm CrossIdeas for an undisclosed sum, the companies said Thursday.

  • Hacker group targets video game companies to steal source code

    A group of attackers with links to the Chinese hacking underground has been targeting companies from the entertainment and video game industries for years with the goal of stealing source code.

  • Xbox One's high price in China draws complaints, but likely buyers too

    Microsoft's Xbox One is poised to be the first foreign game console to debut in China, but as the local pricing was announced on Wednesday -- $200 more than in the U.S. -- would-be customers made their displeasure known online.

  • In a hyper-social world, some seek a little privacy

    After years of cajoling their users into sharing every thought, emotion and selfie, online firms are seeing that providing more private online spaces might also be profitable.

  • Electoral commission cautions against rush to e-voting

    The Australian Electoral Commission has cautioned a parliamentary inquiry about rushing to implement a federal electronic voting scheme.

  • Stanford surgical students set sights on Google Glass

    Stanford University's medical school plans to start using Google's wearable computer, Glass, to help train students in surgery.

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    Cheers and jeers over anti-piracy laws

    Federal government proposals to amend copyright laws have drawn support from rights holders and copyright organisations but some aspects of the enforcement regime outlined in a discussion paper released yesterday have raised concerns among ISPs and consumer advocates.

  • No patch yet for zero day in Symantec Endpoint Protection software driver

    A zero-day flaw in a software driver in Symantec's widely used Endpoint Protection product may be tricky to fix.

  • Oracle-based system for US visas still glitchy after software update

    There's no immediate end in sight to trouble that has hit the U.S. State Department's computer system for processing visa applications and caused problems for thousands of people worldwide.

  • Tor hints at possible U.S. government involvement in recent attack

    Hackers attacked the infrastructure of Tor, the anonymizing service, earlier this month in an incident that may have compromised a number of hidden services, according to an announcement posted today by the Tor Project's director, Roger Dingledine.

  • Internet of Things devices contain high number of vulnerabilities, study finds

    A security audit of 10 popular Internet-connected devices - components of the so-called Internet of Things - identified an alarmingly high number of vulnerabilities.

  • Antivirus products riddled with security flaws, researcher says

    It's generally accepted that antivirus programs provide a necessary protection layer, but organizations should audit such products before deploying them on their systems because many of them contain serious vulnerabilities, a researcher warned.

  • 'Right to be forgotten' ruling is unworkable and misguided, UK Lords say

    The EU court ruling that gives people the "right to be forgotten" by search engines is misguided in principle and unworkable in practice, said a U.K. House of Lords subcommittee Wednesday.

  • Free movie link delivers malware payload: report

    Consumers in Australia and around the world have fallen for a social engineering link promising a free download of Transformers 4, 22 Jump Street or Maleficent.

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    Attorney-General seeks public input on anti-piracy law changes

    Attorney-General George Brandis and communications minister Malcolm Turnbull have opened a public consultation on changes to the enforcement of copyright law.

  • iPhone gets first free app for encrypting voice calls

    An open-source project has released the first free application for the iPhone that scrambles voice calls, which would thwart government surveillance or eavesdropping by hackers.