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  • How hackers accidentally sold a pre-release XBox One to the FBI

    Earlier this week, an indictment was unsealed outlining a long list of charges against a group of men accused of running a three-year hacking spree that stole intellectual property from gaming companies.

  • 4G email scam targets Telstra customers

    Telstra has warned customers to delete a phishing email that claims they need to update their billing information following the introduction of 4G services on the 700MHz spectrum.

  • Wikileaks accuses intelligence watchdog of misleading Senate inquiry

    Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has accused an Australian government agency of giving misleading evidence to a parliamentary inquiry.

  • Shellshock attacks target QNAP's network storage, FireEye says

    FireEye has detected Shellshock attacks against network-attached storage devices made by Taipei-based QNAP and used by universities and research institutes in Korea, Japan and the U.S.

  • White House sets 20% data center efficiency goal, but finds few takers

    Without a carbon tax or anything that penalizes fossil fuel consumption, the federal government has little ability to influence how much energy a data center uses. But it is trying.

  • Report: LulzSec leader directed cyberattacks while working for FBI

    The leader of the now-disbanded LulzSec hacking group directed members to attack targets in dozens of countries, including the U.K., Turkey, Brazil and Australia, even as he was serving as an FBI informant, according to a news report.

  • Google finding its rhythm with streaming music service

    Reports are hitting that Google is just weeks away from launching a new streaming music service.

  • Conservative group says 2.4 million opposed to net neutrality rules

    More than 2.4 million people have signed letters calling on the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to stop its proposed "takeover" of the Internet in an effort by conservative activist group American Commitment to reframe the debate about the agency's proposed net neutrality rules.

  • Xen Project discloses serious vulnerability that impacts virtualized servers

    The Xen Project has revealed the details of a serious vulnerability in the Xen hypervisor that could put the security of many virtualized servers at risk.

  • Expert: Basic hacks can compromise industrial control systems

    Atlanta -- Sophisticated attacks like Stuxnet aren't necessary to compromise industrial control systems for dams, power plants, chemical plants and the like. Rather, simple phishing attacks followed up by using tools that are easily available through Metasploit will do the trick, security pros were told at a conference in Atlanta this week.

  • Don't laugh: Jimmy Kimmel Most Dangerous Cyber Celebrity of 2014

    Late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel doesn't fit the profile of McAfee's usual Most Dangerous Cyber Celebrity, most often in recent years a female celebrity whose online images can frequently lure Web surfers to sites rife with spyware, viruses and other malware.

  • Hurry! Wait! Go! Joomla stumbles with patch for serious vulnerability

    The Joomla project pushed out new updates for its popular content management system Wednesday after a glitch was found in the high-priority security patches it released a day before.

  • OpenVPN servers can be vulnerable to Shellshock Bash vulnerability

    Virtual private network servers based on OpenVPN might be vulnerable to remote code execution attacks through Shellshock and other recent flaws that affect the Bash Unix shell.

  • Hacked celebrities 'dumb', says proposed EU digital commissioner

    Günther Oettinger, the European Union's proposed Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society, gave a disappointing performance at his confirmation hearing, dodging questions and calling the victims of a recent data breach "dumb."

  • Brandis denies ‘overreach’ on national security laws

    Attorney-general George Brandis has said that the government has not overreached with its national security laws and that it has crafted an “appropriate legislative response to the current threat” of terrorism

  • Lack of cyber security investment could backfire on boards: PwC

    The number of reported cyber security incidents globally rose 48 per cent to A$42.8 million in 2013, the equivalent of 117,339 attacks per day, according to PwC’s latest Global State of Information Security Survey.

  • Malware program targets Hong Kong protesters using Apple devices

    A malware program that targets Hong Kong activists using Apple devices has trademarks of being developed by a nation-state, possibly China, according to a security company.

  • Google triples bug bounty reward range to $US15,000

    Google has tripled its maximum reward for finding flaws in its software to US$15,000, a figure the company hopes will deter independent researchers from selling their information on shady markets.

  • Shellshock flaw could pose risks to payments industry

    The "Shellshock" flaw has the potential to pose a risk to the payments industry, but doesn't appear to have caused any problems yet, an official with a consortium run by major credit card companies warned on Tuesday.

  • Microsoft outlines Windows 10 security enhancements

    Microsoft is promising customers who upgrade to the Windows 10 operating system (OS) a number of security features including the creation of secure user IDs and containerisation of business data.