Security » Features »

  • For half, STEM degrees lead to other jobs

    The truth, when it comes to computer employment data, is almost always ugly.

  • Boost your security training with gamification -- really!

    Getting employees to take security seriously can be a game that everyone wins.

  • Apple-IBM deal threatens Android's enterprise push

    The new Apple-IBM partnership seems sure to help Apple sell more iPads to businesses, but it may also be setting off alarm bells at mobile device management companies large and small.

  • Revamping your insider threat program

    Companies including MITRE are looking at privileged access and how to better lock it down -- without stopping employees from doing their jobs.

  • What vacation? Expect to work while you're away

    In these lean times, backups aren't what they used to be; it's inevitable that IT staffers will be called to help, especially when an important issue is brewing.

  • Google's move into home automation means even less privacy

    Plans by smart thermostat maker Nest Labs to share some customer data with corporate parent Google means the search engine giant will be fending off privacy concerns as it expands into home automation.

  • With Android L, Google makes pitch for enterprise users

    Google will provide enterprise-focused security and management features to its entire Android showcase of mobile devices, including features reserved only for Samsung devices running Samsung security software called Knox, a Google executive announced during the Google I/O keynote address Wednesday.

  • XPocalypse, not now

    Two months after Microsoft ended support for Windows XP, the catastrophic wave of exploits security experts expected to wash over the aged operating system have failed to materialize.

  • Sprint-T-Mobile merger questions: Will regulators OK it? And, Legere as CEO?

    With reports out this week that Sprint and T-Mobile US are planning to announce a $32 billion merger this summer, two big questions linger: Would federal regulators approve the deal? And would T-Mobile CEO John Legere run the combined company?

  • Beware the next circle of hell: Unpatchable systems

    Insecure by design and trusted by default, embedded systems present security concerns that could prove crippling

  • Malvertising rise pushes ad industry to action

    With hidden malware on the rise, the online advertising industry may finally have to get its governance act together.

  • Is EU's 'right to be forgotten' really the 'right to edit the truth'?

    With Europe's top court ordering Google to allow people to basically edit their online personal histories, some wonder what this will mean for finding the truth online.

  • Security-vendor snake oil: 7 promises that don't deliver

    Beware bold promises from a multibillion-dollar industry that can't prevent your IT systems from being routinely hacked

  • 11 reasons encryption is (almost) dead

    Massive leaps in computing power, hidden layers, hardware backdoors -- encrypting sensitive data from prying eyes is more precarious than ever

  • Supply chain 2013: New tech tackles unprecedented risks

    IT can never take all the risk out of a supply chain, but it can help organizations minimize their vulnerability in a world of new threats.

  • Microsoft Surface Mini seems likely to ship soon

    Microsoft may be prepping to ship a mini version of its Surface tablets within a month, based on an Amazon.com listing for a case custom made for the device.

  • U.S. commercial drone industry struggles to take off

    The U.S. commercial drone industry is still struggling to get off the ground more than two years after President Obama signed into law a bill that permits the civilian use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) over the country's airspace.

  • 7 all-in-one security suites: Anti-malware for all your devices

    Let's face it: No matter what device you use, you're in danger. Security threats and malware lurk on Windows PCs, Macs, and Android and iOS devices. If you use more than one device -- like most of us do -- that makes it even more difficult and expensive to be vigilant and keep yourself safe.

  • Ad tracking: Is anything being done?

    Online tracking is on the rise, but efforts to create a practical Do Not Track policy have slowed to a crawl. Meanwhile, users and browser companies are taking matters into their own hands.

  • Microsoft returns to scare tactic well in dump-XP campaign

    Microsoft has pulled out the big guns - a fear-of-God approach - to scare users into dumping Windows XP, telling them the most popular tasks done on a PC will put them in the crosshairs of cyber criminals.