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  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Gerry McCartney

    Purdue University wants its students to succeed, and it's using big data to make that happen.

  • Browser fingerprints, and why they are so hard to erase

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • President's cyber security summit: Share attack info but protect privacy, civil liberties

    Participants in the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection on Friday called for government/private sector information sharing, updated regulations, and improving the trust citizens have in the government's respect for privacy and civil liberties.

  • Awareness on the cheap

    You don't have to spend a lot of money on some information security initiatives. Take security awareness, for example. You can get huge returns with small investments.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Breaches are everywhere

    Follow me, if you will, on a journey back in time to just one year ago. As 2013 turned into 2014, the information security industry was buzzing about the latest spate of breaches. Target had ushered in a new era of retail security breaches, with 40 million card numbers lost to the hackers. Little did we know at the time that this was just the beginning, and small potatoes in comparison to what was to come. One year ago, Neiman Marcus and Michaels had joined Target, and I wrote in response to the growing number of breach disclosures that "in fact, I have to wonder which retailers have not suffered breaches. The word on the street is that at least a half-dozen other retailers were compromised in the past few months, without publicity." Sadly, this turned out to be true. I hate being right all the time.

  • NSA approves Samsung and Boeing mobile devices for employee use

    As part of the NSA's program to certify commercial off-the-shelf technology for use inside the agency, mobile devices from Samsung and Boeing have been cleared for use by NSA employees.

  • Breaches are a personal nightmare for corporate security pros

    Beyond the compromise of valuable information, loss of revenues and damage to brand reputation, data breaches can pose a threat to the careers of security professionals involved: witness the sudden departures of both the CEO and the CIO of Target after last year's compromise of 40 million customers' credit cards.

  • Linus Torvalds diversity gaffe brings out the best (and worst) of the open source world

    It all started at the Linux.conf.au Conference, when Nebula developer (and former colleague) Matthew Garrett kicked off a post-keynote Q&A session with Linux kernel creator Linus Torvalds by asking about his often-abrasive, super-aggressive tone on official mailing lists.

  • Lessons from the Sony breach in risk management and business resiliency

    2014 made it clear that cybercrime affects everyone. From retailers to banks, consumer goods companies and health care, there isn't an industry left untouched by cybercriminals looking to disrupt, steal or embarrass. So what has to change? The recent Sony attack and countless other examples point to the need for board members and executives to consider cybersecurity under the concept of risk management and business resilience.

  • Frustrated by new tech?

    LAS VEGAS -- International CES boasts 3,500 vendors this year, many showing off new smartwatches and other wearable gadgets.

  • 10 lessons U.S. tech managers can learn from their counterparts in China

    China is on a technological roll these days -- one that American companies ignore at their own peril. Contrary to outdated Western perceptions, 680 million Chinese have access to either a laptop or a mobile phone, and some 95% of homes in every city in China are now wired for the Internet, according to figures from the Chinese government.

  • Frequently asked questions about the North Korean Internet incident

    News of North Korea's Internet outage was widely covered in the media on Monday of this week, and while a number of questions remain about what happened and who was responsible, speculation has it that North Korea was hit by a DDoS attach."

  • The Sony breach may be start of new nation-state cyberattack

    It has been an exceptional year for IT security breaches, which have become part of an escalating trend in destructive attacks. And they're going to get worse.

  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • Privacy is the new killer app

    A funny thing is happening in the wake of the Edward Snowden NSA revelations, the infamous iCloud hack of celebrity nude photos, and the hit parade of customer data breaches at Target, Home Depot and the U.S. Postal Service. If it's not the government looking at your data, it's bored, lonely teenagers from the Internet or credit card fraudsters.

  • Python-powered StackStorm sets scripts for event-triggered automation

    StackStorm, staffed by former members of GitHub, PuppetLabs, SwiftStack, Rackspace, and the Apache Libcloud team, has launched the first public version of its eponymous open source operations automation solution.

  • Why we live in an anti-tech age

    Though it seems as if we're sourrounded by innovative products, services and technologies, there's a growing counter argument that we're living in a dismal era. Science is hated. Real technological progress has stalled. And what we call innovation today really isn't very innovative.

  • Microsoft Security Essentials may be throwing false positives for Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J

    It's looking more and more likely that Microsoft Security Essentials (MSE) is warning about a Trojan:DOS/Alureon.J infection when none exists.

  • Blowing the whistle without blowing your career

    Technology professionals are among today's most infamous whistleblowers. The list of those who have made headlines for exposing corporate or government skulduggery includes Shawn Carpenter, a network security analyst who blew the lid off a Chinese cyberespionage ring; Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning, who shared more than 250,000 classified State Department cables with WikiLeaks; and Edward Snowden, who leaked top-secret information about NSA surveillance activities.

  • Sorriest technology companies of 2014

    It's so far been another sorry, sorry year in the technology industry, with big name companies, hot startups and individuals making public mea culpas for their assorted dumb, embarrassing and other regrettable actions.