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  • UK government adopts ODF for document exchange with citizens and suppliers

    The U.K. government has adopted ODF as its standard for the exchange of word processor and spreadsheet files between departments and with citizens and suppliers, meaning that companies and citizens will not be required to buy a particular application or software suite in order to collaborate with government staff.

  • Chef cooks ups infrastructure testing tools

    Borrowing a technique from the software development community, Chef, maker of a popular system configuration tool, has released the first commercial software to support a new and supposedly more effective approach to managing hardware and software, called test-driven infrastructure.

  • Cloud, open source power TransLink's Web presence

    It was an aging bespoke application that drove TransLink to seek a new content management system, but it was the strength of the community surrounding the open source project that helped the Queensland public transport agency choose Drupal.

  • Microsoft rumored to be buying security firm that publicized Active Directory exploit

    Microsoft is thinking about buying an Israeli security company that yesterday posted instructions on how to change Active Directory passwords by exploiting a design flaw.

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    Electoral Commission bucks Senate on voting source code

    The Australian Electoral Commission has refused a Senate order to reveal the underlying source code of the EasyCount software used to tabulate votes in upper house elections.

  • Oracle hopes to make SQL a lingua franca for big data

    Oracle is hoping to turn heads in the crowded data analysis market with Big Data SQL, a software tool that can run a single SQL query against Oracle's own database as well as Hadoop and NoSQL data stores.

  • Ubuntu 14.04: Is Canonical taking on too much?

    The recent release of Ubuntu 14.04 Long Term Support/LTS (Trusty Tahr) proves to us once again that it doesn't matter if you're Oracle, Microsoft, or Canonical: Bringing a fleet of products into new release revision synch is tough.

  • Google gets a helping hand from Microsoft, IBM, Red Hat

    IBM, Microsoft, Red Hat and other IT vendors are lending a hand to Google to help build software that enterprises could use to manage their computerized workloads in the cloud.

  • Google, Dropbox band together to fight patent trolls

    Google, Dropbox and a few other high-tech firms have come up with a new way to help defend themselves against patent trolls.

  • NICTA demos drone OS using the seL4 microkernel

    NICTA has created a video that demonstrates how its seL4 microkernel, the “world’s most highly assured OS”, can be used to operate drones.

  • Microsoft backs open source for the Internet of Things

    Microsoft has joined what began as a Linux Foundation effort to create an open platform for the Internet of Things. It's a move that may be telling about Microsoft's plans for home automation, and even for the Xbox.

  • OpenSSL Project publishes roadmap to counter criticism

    The OpenSSL Project is planning a number of changes to ensure its security component, used across millions of computers across the Internet, is in tip-top shape.

  • Netflix open sources its Amazon cloud security enforcer

    Netflix today continued its tradition of sharing lessons it has learned from using Amazon's cloud at a massive scale by releasing Security Monkey, a tool it has developed internally for monitoring the security of its cloud.

  • Databricks takes on Google data streaming analysis with Spark

    Taking on Google, Databricks plans to offer its own cloud service for analyzing live data streams, one based on the Apache Spark software.

  • CoreOS Linux does away with the upgrade cycle

    Hoping to simplify life for system administrators, CoreOS has launched a commercial Linux distribution that continually updates itself, eliminating the need to perform major upgrades.

  • Smooth like btrfs: Inside Facebook's Linux-powered infrastructure

    Facebook engineer Chris Mason is unequivocal about the primacy of Linux in Facebook's storage infrastructure.

  • OpenStack chair: Linux at the cutting edge of the cloud

    The cloud-dominated world of modern IT is the perfect breeding ground for the spread of Linux in particular and open-source software in general, according to the man responsible for guiding one of the most important open-source projects.

  • New software targets hard-to-understand privacy policies

    Have you ever tried to read a website's privacy policy only to give up after slogging through paragraphs and paragraphs of dense, lawyerly language? Privacy-focused companies Disconnect and TRUSTe have released a new browser add-on that attempts to translate those policies into easy-to-understand terms.

  • ISC: Cray makes Lustre palatable for storage administrators

    Supercomputer vendor Cray is trying to make the Lustre file system easier to work with, allowing users to copy material from the file system into a multilayered storage archiving system.

  • Red Hat adds to OpenStack expertise with eNovance buy

    Red Hat is filling out its OpenStack portfolio by acquiring eNovance, a provider of integration services, for approximately US$95 million in cash and stock.