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  • Australian developers re-architect government-focused CMS

    Australian web development shop PreviousNext is planning to release a significantly re-architected version of its aGov web platform before the end of the financial year.

  • Does your company run on open-source software? Join the (very large) club

    Every year, open-source software "eats" more of the business world.

  • Meet the new leader of Debian open source project

    Neil McGovern is the new leader of the Debian open source/free software project after defeating two rival contenders in a vote held among developers that closed on Wednesday. He takes over from Lucas Nussbaum, who did not seek re-election after two years at the helm.

  • govCMS to release its own Drupal distribution

    The government's govCMS project will make its own Drupal distribution publicly available for download, it announced today.

  • Will containers kill the virtual machine?

    Two years ago when Frank Macreery started Aptible to help companies host sensitive healthcare data in the cloud, as CTO he decided that containers would play a pivotal role in the company's operations.

  • Halogenics bets on Javascript, open source

    Melbourne-based software developer Halogenics is hoping within the next few months to have prototype versions of the next-generation of its Genotrack application.

  • Need to plumb Hadoop data lakes? This new tool can help

    Think Big on Monday took the wraps off its Dashboard Engine for Hadoop, which aims to make it easier for business users to extract insights from the vast lakes of data stored in Hadoop.

  • Canon XC10 4K camcorder has rotating grip

    Canon thinks a rotating grip will help entice amateur video buffs to spend around US$2,000 on its latest camcorder offering "ultra high definition" resolution of 3,840 by 2,160 pixels, also known as 4K.

  • Linux Australia breached, personal details leaked

    The open-source and free software user group Linux Australia said personal information for attendees of two conferences it hosts may have been leaked after malware was found on one of its servers.

  • The new struggles facing open source

    The early days of open source were fraught with religious animosities we feared would tear apart the movement: free software fundamentalists haggling with open source pragmatists over how many Apache licenses would fit on the head of a pin. But once commercial interests moved in to plunder for profit, the challenges faced by open source pivoted toward issues of control.

  • Would Microsoft ever open-source Windows?

    Once upon a time not so very long ago, Microsoft was widely considered the very antithesis of open-source software. Steve Ballmer called Linux "a cancer," and Bill Gates shared similar views about the open-source philosophy in general.

  • Over 100,000 devices can be used to amplify DDoS attacks via multicast DNS

    Over 100,000 devices have a misconfigured service called multicast DNS that accepts requests from the Internet and can potentially be abused to amplify distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks.

  • Thousands call on Congress to overturn net neutrality rules

    Opponents of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's new net neutrality rules aren't giving up, with a conservative advocacy group saying it has collected more than 540,000 signatures on a petition asking Congress to overturn the agency's action.

  • SDN management battle: TAPs vs. network packet brokers

    Network management is a sticky issue when it comes to implementing software-defined networks and network virtualization.

  • India backs open source software for e-governance projects

    India has said it will use open source software in all e-governance projects, though it did not rule out the use of proprietary software to meet specialized requirements.

  • Google Cloud Launcher deploys VM-based apps in a snap

    Google's latest enhancement to Cloud Platform is not a new feature but a repackaging of an existing innovation. But it's a downright useful offering all the same.

  • An SDN vulnerability forced OpenDaylight to focus on security

    Open-source software projects are often well intended, but security can take a back seat to making the code work.

  • Database pioneer Stonebraker rocks $1M "Nobel Prize in Computing"

    Michael Stonebraker, whose database software breakthroughs helped to tame information overload long before we referred to it as big data, is the recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award, a.k.a. the "Nobel Prize in Computing."

  • Cloud threatening software freedom, advocate says

    The public cloud increasingly is isolating users from the actual computing that they're doing, threatening their control over the process and posing a danger to software freedom, said academic and former Debian project leader Stefano Zacchiroli on Sunday at LibrePlanet 2015.

  • Stallman joins the Internet, talks net neutrality, patents and more

    According to Richard Stallman, godfather of the free software movement, Facebook is a "monstrous surveillance engine," tech companies working for patent reform aren't going nearly far enough, and parents must lobby their children's schools to keep data private and provide free software alternatives.