Networking » Reviews »

  • Review: RHEL 7 lands with a jolt

    There's a lot to like in the next Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but some fundamental changes may prove problematic

  • Review: VMware VSAN turns storage inside-out

    VMware's Virtual SAN 1.0 combines easy setup and management with high availability and high performance -- and freedom from traditional storage systems

  • PaaS shoot-out: Cloud Foundry vs. OpenShift

    Cloud Foundry shines with broad application support and stellar ease of use, but OpenShift has the edge in management and automation

  • Aiia SSSSSpeaker: Cheap and cheerful BT audio

    The people at a company called aiia (their Web site loads insanely slowly) out of the Ukraine pitched me the SSSSSpeaker (yes, that's how they spell it, it's not a a typo), billed as the world's smallest Bluetooth speaker, and sent me a unit.

  • Bluedriver: Vehicle data capture for geeks

    A couple of weeks ago I wrote about Automatic, a dongle that plugs into your car's OBD-II connector and sends data about your car's performance and your driving via Bluetooth LE to an app on your iOS or Android smartphone.

  • Working together: 3 new team collaboration tools

    Three new services -- Flow, Glip and Slingshot -- try to enhance the ability of teams to converse and collaborate using a variety of tools.

  • Review: Cloud Foundry brings power and polish to PaaS

    Cloud Foundry impresses with broad application support, streamlined deployment, and enterprise extras from Pivotal, though initial setup could be simpler

  • Android Wear deep-dive review: A smart start to smartwatch software

    Google's Android Wear platform is an impressive first step toward making smartwatches people will actually want to buy. Here's an in-depth look at where the software shines -- and where it falls short.

  • Samsung Gear Live vs. LG G Watch: A real-world evaluation

    The LG G Watch vs. Samsung Gear Live may look similar, but the first two Android Wear watches have some meaningful differences.

  • Nova: Bluetooth flash for iPhone

    There are many times when your iPhone camera flash just isn't up for the job. Either you need light from a different angle (ever notice how phone-based flashes tend to wash out the subject?) or you need a warmer or cooler flash than your iPhone provides. You, my friend, might be interested in the Nova, a Bluetooth LE flash.

  • Nutanix NX-3000 review: Virtualization Cloud-style

    Nutanix Virtual Computing Platform brings resilient, cloud-like server and storage infrastructure to traditional virtualization deployments

  • Lenovo's new ThinkServer: Low sticker price, lots of upgrade options

    We tested the Lenovo RD440 as a base-unit, 2U server. We found it pretty generic on the surface, but options, including software pre-loads, increase its potential utility for volume users and especially smaller operations.

  • Review: Dell WYSE delivers Android-on-a-stick

    Thin clients aren't very exciting, and for a reason: they're designed to allow remote access to servers, usually with a Citrix, Microsoft, or VMware client. The folks at Dell WYSE have spiced up the category by building a thin client on top of Android, and getting it down to a form factor only slightly larger than a USB memory stick.

  • Linksys WRT1900AC: The best open router yet

    Linksys' ambitious, prosumer-grade Wi-Fi router is pricey compared to the classic WRT54G router that inspired it, but it comes with a great feature set

  • Tails 1.0: A bootable Linux distro that protects your privacy

    Whatever your primary OS, Linux distro Tails 1.0 offers a plethora of security features to help you work online without worrying about privacy issues.

  • 5 Twitter clients for Linux

    Linux users who want to avoid browser-based Twitter apps can try out these five local clients -- including one that still uses a command-line interface.

  • Unisys unveils invisibility cloak for network traffic

    If you are ultra paranoid, what could be better than hiding your network traffic in such a way that no one could possibly intercept it? This is what Unisys is offering with its new Stealth appliance, which could make man-in-the-middle attacks and keylogger exploits obsolete, or at least more difficult to mount.

  • Review: Fluke reinvents handheld network testing

    The Fluke Networks LinkSprinter makes on-the-fly network testing quick, easy, and more affordable than ever

  • Fedora tips its hat to mobility, cloud, big data

    The latest release of Fedora, nicknamed "Heisenbug," is a step towards making Fedora a player in the mobile arena. Fedora 20 also includes more support for cloud, and this is also the first release that supports cheap, low-power ARM processors as a primary architecture, in addition to Intel and AMD chips.

  • AirMagnet breaks new ground in wireless spectrum analysis

    Everyone needs a Wi-Fi spectrum analyzer, but there are times when analyzing cellular spectrum is also essential. Fluke Networks' new AirMagnet Spectrum ES provides a broad range of capability at a very attractive price. Spectral analysis, a longstanding fixture in electronics and manufacturing test, and, more recently as a valuable tool for understanding coverage, interference, and other elements of Wi-Fi, is the art and science of extracting meaning and insight from wireless systems at Layer 1 -- radio waves.