Networking » Opinions »

  • Does the connected workforce breach employee privacy?

    Wearables will make it infinitely easier for companies to track employees. But without transparency, that will foster suspicion.

  • Evan Schuman: The data dangers of free public Wi-Fi

    New York's plan to turn pay phones into free Wi-Fi stations could be a template for other cities, and bad news for IT departments trying to protect corporate data and intellectual property.

  • What to know after the latest patent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court

    The Alice ruling clarifies patent-eligible software processes.

  • How to effectively manage the integration of IT/OT in the hyper-connected enterprise

    There has been a lot of discussion lately about the Internet of Things (IoT) and how connected endpoints can help revolutionize the way businesses collect and process information from Operational Technology (OT) systems, but there are huge challenges in accessing the information and making it accessible to your other business systems, employees and business partners.

  • What you should know about SDN and Wi-Fi

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • The Apple/IBM deal: iOS claims the IoT

    The partnership announced last week isn't just about selling more iPhones. It's part of a big push into the Internet of Things.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Bye, Nokia, nice knowing you

    Nokia, once a great company and the pride of Finland, is shuffling to its grave under Microsoft's leadership.

  • The benefits of converged network and application performance management

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Bankers beware: Technology is going to get you (and none of us will care)

    Technology is about to take a big slice of the traditional banking business. Bankers have been slow to see what's coming, but they're starting to realize what's at stake.

  • Promise Theory

    The way we have created IT systems over the years has been very linear with each individual component being statically configured. If a human makes an error in any one of the many configurations, then the whole system breaks down. Over the years, IT systems have become increasingly complex with multiple layers of abstraction and virtualization making it difficult to enforce stability and gain scalability. Promise theory provides a new way to think about how IT systems rely on each other to form an entire system that businesses can depend. This article will cover the foundation concept of promise theory and give examples of how it is used.

  • 'Luckily, monkeys love to gamble' ... but they're just as irrational about it as humans

    If you've ever ridden a hot streak "too long" at a blackjack table or left in a huff after the dealer hit 21 three times in a row, then you are no better at gambling than a rhesus monkey.

  • And there's something else wrong with Comcast's Xfinity customer-based Wi-Fi hotspot plan ...

    I have, in previous Gearhead articles (first in Comcast's latest bad idea turns your Wi-Fi into everybody's Wi-Fi and then in Revisiting Comcast's Xfinity public hotspot strategy), discussed Comcast's strategy for implementing opt-out Wi-Fi hotspots on their customers' Xfinity gateways. In the latter post I questioned the security of the service and noted that access to the Comcast service isn't as tightly controlled as the company might think.

  • Why Android Wear is the new iPad

    Columnist Mike Elgan tested a smartwatch with Android Wear and said he has experienced a culture-changing platform.

  • Turning network resource management on its head through software-defined WANs

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Revisiting Comcast's Xfinity public hotspot strategy

    Last week I wrote about Comcast's plan to build the nation's biggest Wi-Fi service by co-opting their customers' Xfinity gateways and, following a detailed conversation with a representative from Comcast's Corporate Communications group, I have some corrections to make and quite a few additional concerns to add.

  • 100Mb/sec Ethernet coming to a car near you?

    As more and more infotainment and crash avoidance technology gets stuffed to cars and trucks, the need for better, faster and more reliable in-car networking equipment grows. In theory at least.

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    The PSTN transition to VoIP: Going green

    We've discussed some of the advantages of transitioning the PSTN to IP, but there we haven't yet covered the environmental implications of the pending transition. At their annual partner conference Perspectives14, GENBAND hosted a discussion which addressed the power costs behind the PSTN, pointing out the benefits an IP transition.

  • Hungry ants knock out FiOS service ... again

    Everyone keeps asking if the ants actually ate their way through the fiber optic cable and I do not know the answer. What is certain is that they chewed through the outer casing and caused enough damage to knock out TV, phone and Internet service to my house: the Verizon triple no-play.

  • Microsoft introduces Interflow: Sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time

    Microsoft announced Interflow, a new platform for sharing cybersecurity threats in near real-time. Although it's currently available only in "private preview" for Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP) members, security threat information will be shared faster, creating a "collectively stronger cybersecurity ecosystem." In the long run that means protecting people better and more quickly.

  • Why Facebook's SDN switch won't affect Cisco's customers

    Last week, Facebook announced a new product that's supposed to have the networking industry trembling. There were many news stories about Facebook's new homegrown SDN switch, known by the codename "Wedge" that's supposed to be the next big threat to Cisco and the traditional networking vendors. The operating system on the product runs Facebook's proprietary version of Linux called FBOSS.