Networking » Opinions »

  • Apple’s 3D Touch system may be useful — someday

    The system is counterintuitive, and its usefulness is yet to be demonstrated.

  • Just give up on mobile already, Microsoft

    How many ways can Microsoft fail with mobile technology? There was Windows CE -- a failure. Windows Mobile -- a flop. And, more recently, Windows Phone -- a fiasco.

  • Broadband for all

    There's no mere digital divide in the United States; it's a chasm. It ensures that the have-nots will always have less, and those with broadband access will have more. It's time to finally end that, and guarantee that everyone in the country, no matter how poor, gets broadband and its many benefits.

  • Restoring a vibrant and open Internet

    The Internet has functioned well for decades with minimal regulation of either access or edge providers. The <a href="">Federal Communications Commission's open-Internet order</a> replaces that stable equilibrium with an asymmetric regime that is inherently unstable and antithetical to investment and innovation.

  • Verizon's buy of AOL would offer edge against Google, Facebook on mobile ads

    In the Internet era, many multibillion-dollar acquisitions sound insanely ambitious and out of line.

  • Broadband is like a river (but not the way you think)

    In his 2014 book, <em>The Accidental Superpower</em>, Peter Zeihan traces the origins of America's economic prosperity to its abundance of rivers. The U.S. has more miles of navigable waterways, which provide a uniquely efficient and inexpensive means for transporting goods across a continent, than the rest of the world put together. According to Zeihan, this difference was a critical factor in the country's emergence as the world's leading superpower. And because rivers do not require large-scale efforts to build and operate, they favor decentralized development, which has encouraged local entrepreneurs, who represent a distinctive aspect of the U.S. economy. The U.S. is also blessed with many natural harbors that are another major contributor to a country's economic success.

  • Let's rethink email

    I've been using email longer than most people (more than a quarter of a century), so I think I have the credibility to say it's overdue for an overhaul.

  • We've got net neutrality. Now the real work begins.

    Now that <a href="">net neutrality is the law of the land</a>, you may feel inclined to pat yourself on the back for a job well done. After all, a big reason the FCC backed net neutrality was the outpouring of support for it.

  • The signs of spring: Birds, flowers and new tech

    Back in the dark ages, when the only way to get onscreen entertainment was by tuning in a television set at a specific time (get home late? miss your favorite show? too bad for you!), networks had a habit of scheduling similar shows opposite each other. The notion was presumably, that the competition would cause one show to win out over the other, which would eventually drop in the ratings and get cancelled. The idea that viewers might be interested in seeing both apparently was not in the networks' psychology.

  • Pulling net neutrality from a swamp of lies

    On Feb. 26, the Federal Communications Commission voted, along strict party lines, to <a href="">approve new net neutrality rules</a> by reclassifying broadband as a regulated public utility. So does that save the Internet or lock it up in a bureaucratic, censored, expensive prison?

  • Fave Raves 2015: What's your favorite enterprise IT product?

    Do you have a favorite enterprise IT product you can't live without? Tell us about it and we'll share your raves with our readers. (Here's a link to <a href="">last year's Fave Raves</a> collection.)

  • The FCC's Orwellian Internet policy

    President Obama's secret plan to protect the "open Internet" is locked inside the Federal Communications Commission. We don't know what's in the 322 pages, but we are told it includes a transparency rule.  

  • Outsourcing contracts: Foundations for success

    Most business and IT leaders learned to negotiate with outsourcers 15 or 20 years ago, when the virtual corporation was seen as the organization to emulate. Although virtual organizations have faded, they provided valuable lessons regarding how to structure outsourcing contracts. Unfortunately, those lessons are being lost. Over the last few years, I have encountered multiple organizations making "first-time buyer" mistakes when negotiating with outsourcers.

  • What happens next in the Cisco suit against Arista?

    Arista Networks' stock took it on the chin when Cisco slapped the company with patent infringement and copyright law suits last Friday, losing almost 20% of its value at one point as investors and others mulled the long term implications of the suits.

  • Obama's Internet plan plays favorites, and Netflix is one of the darlings

    President Obama recently announced <a href="">his plan</a> to regulate the Internet under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act. This law nurtured America's telephone monopoly for 50 years. Under the president's plan, Internet service would be treated like a public utility, subject to rate regulation and state utilities commission oversight. The <a href="">plan Obama proposes</a> to prevent Internet service providers (ISP) from playing favorites with content ironically reveals him to be playing favorites with content providers such as Netflix.

  • Doing digital right

    If analysts are right, worldwide technology spending will total $3.8 trillion this year. A significant chunk of that money will be devoted to re-engineering business processes and customer experiences for the digital world. And unfortunately much of it will be wasted.

  • Slow Internet links got you down? It's Dyn to the rescue

    As businesses extend their reach to more corners of the world, wouldn't it be nice if you could monitor any Internet service provider from any location? Thankfully, Dyn, which sells DNS management tools, acquired Renesys earlier this year and extended the features of the Renesys' Internet Intelligence product.

  • How will iPhone 6's Wi-Fi calling, VoLTE affect enterprise networks?

    While the cosmetic features like screen size and processing power of Apple's new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus attracted the most attention, their use of Wi-Fi and Voice over LTE (VoLTE) for voice and video calling could eventually have a major impact on how phone calls are handled in the enterprise.

  • Build it or buy it: Questions to ask about your metro data center network infrastructure

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Understanding SDN Vendor Ecosystems

    Followers of Software Defined Networking (SDN) might recognize a sort of market maturation. We don't mean maturity of the product sets, or even how SDN is technically achieved. Those elements are still coming along. We mean vendor SDN strategies are settling in.