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  • Cisco: See No EVO, Hear No EVO, Speak New Partnerships

    It hasn't been lost on the IT vendor community and IT professionals that Cisco is absent from the VMware EVO:RAIL partner program. With all of the powerhouses participating in the program, you'd think that Cisco would jump right into the mix. Considering Cisco's growth in the server market and the fact that it doesn't currently have its own storage play, this opportunity appears to be ideal for Cisco.

  • iWARP update advances RDMA over Ethernet for data center and cloud networks

    The challenge for data center operators selecting a high performance transport technology for their network is striking the ideal balance between acquisition, deployment and management costs, and support for high performance capabilities such as the remote direct memory access (RDMA) protocol.

  • Displaced IT workers are being silenced

    A major problem with the H-1B debate is the absence of displaced IT workers in news media accounts. Much of the reporting is one-sided -- and there's a reason for this.

  • Cloud upstarts: Too cheap to trust?

    Hosting provider Atlantic.net launched a $0.99 per month cloud server this fall, which is significantly less expensive than the $0.013 per hour starting price for market-leader Amazon Web Services' on-demand Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) virtual machines.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

  • Cisco exec: Turnover in engineering no problem

    The engineering reorganization currently underway at Cisco is intended to streamline product development and delivery to customers, Cisco says.

  • Why we live in an anti-tech age

    Though it seems as if we're sourrounded by innovative products, services and technologies, there's a growing counter argument that we're living in a dismal era. Science is hated. Real technological progress has stalled. And what we call innovation today really isn't very innovative.

  • ‘Unlawful' WiFi hotspot blocking ruling highlights academic IT headaches

    Managing the wireless environment at the average college or university can be a difficult task at the best of times, and when students and staff start using personal hotspots the sort that provide wireless data access from the same -- it's not the best of times.

  • Incremental SDN: Automating Network Device Configuration

    The definition of Software Defined Networking (SDN) continues to broaden, today including functions such as configuration automation and orchestration. While these tasks aren't strictly SDN, the fact is software is used to define some aspect of the network infrastructure in both cases, so vendors have stretched the definition of SDN to bring configuration automation and orchestration platforms into the mix. In fairness, the line gets blurry, as some modern orchestration systems use programmatic interfaces to provision the network instead of traditional configuration tools such as SSH or SNMP.

  • A common theme in identity and access management failure: lack of Active Directory optimization

    From the vantage point of most people, even technical folks, Active Directory (AD) seems like it's doing pretty well. How often can you not log in when you sit down at your PC? How often do you fail to find someone in the corporate directory in Outlook? How many times have you heard of an AD outage?

  • Meet Cobol's hard core fans

    Some of the world's largest businesses say their Cobol application infrastructure, running on state-of-the-art big iron, still delivers a powerful competitive advantage. The challenge going forward will be staffing it.

  • Sprint's cut in data prices won't help its network woes

    Sprint's new lower-priced shared data plan sounds ambitious, but analysts say it doesn't go far enough and won't address the carrier's network performance sore spot.

  • IoT is here and there, but not everywhere yet

    The Internet of Things is still too hard. Even some of its biggest backers say so.

  • For half, STEM degrees lead to other jobs

    The truth, when it comes to computer employment data, is almost always ugly.

  • A guide to the confusing Internet of Things standards world

    Google recently announced a new networking protocol called Thread that aims to create a standard for communication between connected household devices.

  • Apple-IBM deal threatens Android's enterprise push

    The new Apple-IBM partnership seems sure to help Apple sell more iPads to businesses, but it may also be setting off alarm bells at mobile device management companies large and small.

  • SIP global roll-out to accelerate through 2019

    SIP roll-out has picked and, by 2019, SIP worldwide traffic could be more than double today's volume. While 30% of worldwide network traffic today moves with the use of SIP, in 2019 76% of outbound call traffic will be SIP.

  • Best Places to Work in IT: Search the archives 1994-2014

    See who's made the list the last 21 years.

  • Pirates, cheats and IT certs

    Some ne'er-do-wells steal test questions and answers, and cheaters buy that information, share answers in chat rooms, pay other people to take tests for them and bring a range of technologies and techniques into test centers to gain an edge.

  • Predictive data, the real workhorse behind the Internet of Things

    Companies are having to be pickier about which data sets they collect, process and use. It's all about having the right architecture in place.

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