Networking News, Features, and Interviews

News
  • Wi-Fi Passpoint standard now knits together SF, San Jose, London

    A partnership that lets Wi-Fi users get on free public networks in San Francisco and San Jose, California, with a one-time joining process now also covers a hotspot along the River Thames in London.

  • Wireless price war's good for consumers, but challenges carriers

    More than any time in the past decade, wireless customers are reaping the benefits of a carrier price war over smartphones and tablets, as well as monthly data service contracts.

  • The ratings: Most net neutrality groups get poor grades for funding transparency

    After a spate of news stories about alleged "astroturf" advocacy in a contentious U.S. net neutrality debate, the IDG News Service looked into the funding transparency of several think tanks and advocacy groups involved in the issue. Several disclose limited or no information about their funding, we found.

  • Advocacy groups accused of obscuring corporate ties in net neutrality debate

    A spate of recent news stories have revealed that a wide variety of lobby groups have financial ties to broadband carriers and trade associations, accusing them of faking grassroots opposition to strong net neutrality rules.

  • Secretive funding fuels ongoing net neutrality astroturfing controversy

    The contentious debate about net neutrality in the U.S. has sparked controversy over a lack of funding transparency for advocacy groups and think tanks, which critics say subverts the political process.

  • Collection of new cord cutting techs make it easier to snip that CATV tether

    "I want to watch what I want, when I want, wherever I want, and I don't want to pay through the nose for it."

  • Microsoft exec opens up about Research lab closure, layoffs

    It's been a bit over a month since <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/article/2685296/microsoft-subnet/microsoft-boards-up-research-lab-amid-more-layoffs.html">Microsoft shuttered its Microsoft Research lab</a> in Silicon Valley as part of the company's broader restructuring that will include 18,000 layoffs. This week, Harry Shum, Microsoft EVP of Technology &amp; Research, posted what he termed an "open letter to the academic research community" <a href="http://blogs.msdn.com/b/msr_er/archive/2014/10/21/harry-shum-open-letter-to-academic-research-community.aspx">on the company's research blog</a>.

  • Akamai sees record-setting spikes in size and volume of DDoS attacks

    The size and volume of distributed denial-of-service attacks has exploded in the past year, with a 389 percent increase in average attack bandwidth between the third quarter of 2013 and the third quarter of 2014, according to an Internet security report from Akamai Technologies.

  • Australian ISP stands up to filmmakers hunting pirates

    The producer of Oscar-winning film, Dallas Buyers Club, has taken its hunt for pirates of the film to Australia, after filing a barrage of antipiracy lawsuits in the US. But at least one Australian Internet service provider is pushing back out of concern that the movie producer aims to intimidate its customers into paying excessive damages.

  • At Austin airport, Wi-Fi predicts how long the security line will be

    The Internet can ease travel concerns in many ways, including flight-delay information, maps of road congestion, and ride-sharing apps. But a Wi-Fi network at the Austin, Texas, airport can now answer one of the great unknowns: How long will I have to wait in line at security?