Mobility & Wireless » Reviews »

  • Review: Formlabs Form 1+ 3D printer offers mind-blowing precision (video)

    The Formlabs Form 1+ 3D printer ($3,299) is elegant in its simplicity, and more capable of producing accurate models with detailed intricacy than any other 3D printer I've reviewed.

  • Review: 7 Android apps that track your expenses

    Traveling these days is a hassle, no matter why you're going, or where -- and the necessity to track your expenses along the way just adds to the irritation. A good app, though, can make things a lot easier -- not only during the trip but afterwards, when you have to report it all to your (or your company's) accountant.

  • Linksys WRT1200AC: A fast, full-featured, open-source-friendly router

    Sometimes, less is truly more. When it comes to the Linksys WRT1200AC, the little brother to the WRT1900AC router introduced last year, it might be best to say less is just enough.

  • Hands-on: 48 hours with the Apple Watch

    It's seemed like a long wait from when rumors of the Apple Watch first emerged two years ago to April 10, 2015, when Apple began accepting pre-orders. I was one of the lucky early purchasers and my Watch has finally arrived. So was all that anticipation worth it?

  • Review: The Aircharge Wireless Charging Case for the iPhone 6 is hard to resist

    When I bought my iPhone 6 earlier this year, I also purchased a simple, transparent case to protect it; the case cost me $35.

  • First look: Apple's new MacBook is small, yet completely capable

    A few years ago, my first impression of the MacBook Air was generally dismissive -- I felt the Air was underpowered and overpriced -- until I took a second look and realized it was perfect for road warriors. I won't make that mistake twice with Apple's latest MacBook. Like the MacBook Air, the 12-in. MacBook has new design elements that will be a deal-breaker for some and a revelation for others.

  • OneTouch Idol 3 review: How good can a $250 smartphone be?

    It's amazing what type of technology a couple of hundred bucks can get you these days.

  • Hands on: The first Apple Watch apps for road warriors

    Now that the Apple Watch is here, does it do enough useful things to be a standard item for executives, road warriors, and other digital denizens?

  • Review: The Intel Compute Stick - the ultimate mobile PC

    Stick PCs -- computers contained in a device no larger than a USB key and which, when mated with a monitor, become full desktop PCs -- have been around for a while. However, they have recently started to gain more visibility, primarily because of their ultra-portability, minimal power/space needs and ease of use. They may not be very useful for things like airline flights, but they open the way for carrying around presentations, creating public kiosks and allowing you to use another's computer without needing to access their data (or allowing them to accidentally access yours).

  • Review: The da Vinci Junior is the Easy-Bake oven of 3D printers

    XYZprinting has been making hay by offering some of the most affordable consumer plug-and-play 3D printers, shipping 30,000 of its da Vinci model machines last year.

  • HTC One M9 deep-dive review: Third time's (almost) the charm

    When you start with something exceptional, subtle refinements can go a long way.

  • Galaxy S6 deep-dive review: Samsung's shining star

    I never thought I'd say this, but here we go: Samsung is about to release a beautifully designed phone.

  • Galaxy S6 Edge review: Innovative, impressive -- and impractical

    Let this serve as a lesson: Looks can be deceiving.

  • Deep-dive review: New 13-in. MacBook Pro brings Force Touch to the trackpad

    The last time I reviewed the 13-in. MacBook Pro, I was quickly won over by its size, portability and performance. The solid build of the aluminum chassis wrapped around the high-resolution Retina display, in concert with great performance and battery life, led me to confidently recommend that computer.

  • Asus ZenBook UX305 vs. Dell XPS 13: Thin, light and powerful

    If Apple's new 12-in. Retina MacBook is any indication, the laptop is no longer considered an endangered species -- as long as it's slim and lightweight. However, while the new MacBook is extraordinarily portable and comes with an impressive display, it's garnered a bit of criticism because of its single USB port (which does double duty as a power port) and lack of SD card slots. On the other hand, two new Windows 8.1 systems have recently shipped that not only push the thin-and-light envelope, but offer enough features to make them suitable for both personal and business use.

  • Chromebook Pixel (2015) review: A cloud dweller's dream machine

    Chrome OS enthusiasts are always clamoring for high-quality hardware -- cloud-centric laptops with solid construction, snappy performance and stunning displays. But the vast majority of Chromebooks cater to the budget end of the market.

  • Break me if you can: 4 rugged tablets put to the test

    It's a cruel world out there for tablets: Every day, there's the possibility they will be dropped, knocked, spilled on or just shaken around. And that's just in a normal business day -- if you use your tablet outdoors, while traveling or in a work zone, the odds of a disaster go up precipitously.

  • Galaxy S6 first look: Inspired by the iPhone 6, but no mere clone

    Samsung today announced the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge, its flagship smartphones for 2015. I was able to use the two devices briefly in advance for a first look, and I was impressed. The new Galaxy S6 devices have a much nicer feel and more thoughtful design than last year's plasticky, boorish Galaxy S5.

  • Sturdy design is still Moto E's trump card

    The Moto E's specification doesn't stand out from the competition even with LTE and a faster processor. Instead it's the design that makes Motorola's new device a good alternative for consumers who want an affordable smartphone.

  • Two OSes in one: DuOS-M puts Android on your Windows device

    Do you have a favorite Android app that you wish you could run on your Windows tablet or laptop? Well, now you can. A new program called DuOS-M runs full-blown Android as its own Windows application, so that you run almost any Android app on a Windows 7/8/8.1 system.