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  • The signs of spring: Birds, flowers and new tech

    Back in the dark ages, when the only way to get onscreen entertainment was by tuning in a television set at a specific time (get home late? miss your favorite show? too bad for you!), networks had a habit of scheduling similar shows opposite each other. The notion was presumably, that the competition would cause one show to win out over the other, which would eventually drop in the ratings and get cancelled. The idea that viewers might be interested in seeing both apparently was not in the networks' psychology.

  • Inside Apple's gigantic Apple Watch rollout

    The Apple Watch may or may not be an impressive piece of design or technology. But one thing is certain: Apple's preparations for retail sales of the watch are amazing.

  • Where's the data?

    It's a time-honored tradition: U.S. businesses find ways to skirt inconvenient or expensive laws by moving operations to other countries. Thus we have had U.S. corporations operating overseas to exploit child labor, run sweatshops or avoid taxes and rigorous health and safety inspections. Now the U.S. government says something similar is happening in regards to email.

  • Understanding the Meerkat live-streaming magic

    You're going to be hearing a lot about a new app called Meerkat.

  • How does Apple Pay work on the Apple Watch?

    So, it's April 25, 2015 and the delivery man has just delivered your new Apple Watch. Your first instinct: Spend more hard-earned cash trying out Apple's mobile payment system, Apple Pay.

  • Apple 'springs forward' with more than just the Watch

    When Apple execs took the stage on Monday, virtually everyone expected them to focus on the soon-to-be-released Apple Watch. That, they did. The Watch, we now know, arrives in retail on April 24, and it did indeed get most of the attention. But it wasn't the only thing to catch my eye.

  • Web browsers are also to blame for Lenovo's Superfish fiasco

    Lenovo pre-installing Superfish software was a security disaster. Whether Lenovo was evil, or, as they eventually claimed, merely incompetent, it's hard to trust them going forward. If nothing else, their initial denials that anything was wrong, leave a lasting impression. Of course, Superfish, along with the software that they bundled from Komodia, also deserve plenty of blame for breaking the security of HTTPS and SSL/TLS.

  • Four incredible smartphone camera technologies

    Mobile World Congress this week ushered in a range of trends, including home automation, car automation and 5G.

  • Fave Raves 2015: What's your favorite enterprise IT product?

    Do you have a favorite enterprise IT product you can't live without? Tell us about it and we'll share your raves with our readers. (Here's a link to last year's Fave Raves collection.)

  • Confessions of a technobiophiliac

    Smartphone makers like Apple, Samsung and others have flirted with different materials to make their smartphones -- metal, plastic, even glass front and back with the iPhone 4 line.

  • Rating the payment options

    Several electronic and mobile payment options have become available, but most of us in the U.S. are still using plain-vanilla credit and debit cards with magnetic stripes. They use technology that dates to the first Nixon administration. That's not a problem in itself; I have no problem with time-tested security measures that work effectively. But just look around: Data breaches are everywhere, and those magnetic-stripe cards are often implicated.

  • Tech toys train tots for a troubling tomorrow

    Toys always reflect the larger culture -- its biases, fears and, most of all, its technology. New York's Toy Fair 2015 happened this week, and the latest round of new tech toys is bringing some of the most disturbing tech trends to children.

  • Why Apple is the most successful company in history

    Everyone knows that Apple had a great fourth quarter and that its most successful product line, the iPhone, is doing better than ever, too.

  • The ‘sophisticated attack' myth

    Sometimes I wonder whether any company will ever fall victim to an unsophisticated cyberattack. Because after every attack that comes to light, we hear that same excuse: It was a sophisticated attack.

  • Protect yourself from hackers and the NSA

    The downside of email, chat, text and messaging apps is that they make you feel like you're communicating privately, with only the intended recipients. And that your messages are private. Until they're not.

  • The Apple Watch conundrum revisited

    Two years ago, I asked Creative Strategies analyst Ben Bajarin and curiousrat.com's Harry Marks -- both of them experts in all things Apple -- to share their ideas on what a successful mass-market wearable would be. In a world of smartphones, tablets, notebooks and miscellaneous gadgets, would there be a mass-market audience for yet another device to charge and keep track of? And would a smartwatch from Apple be disruptive enough to matter?

  • It's time for the chip-and-PIN'ing of America

    Thank goodness for that signature on the back of my credit card. If it weren't for that smudged scrawl, a thief might steal my card (or card number) and make fraudulent purchases. Or steal my identity. Right.

  • Can you trust Amazon's WorkMail?

    When Amazon unveiled its cloud-based corporate WorkMail email offering last week (Jan. 28), it stressed the high-level of encryption it would use and the fact that corporate users would control their own decryption keys. But Amazon neglected to mention that it will retain full access to those messages -- along with the ability to both analyze data for e-commerce marketing and to give data to law enforcement should subpoenas show up.

  • Career advice: Are government jobs technological backwaters?

    Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader

  • 7 smartphone rules changed this week

    Federal regulators have been throwing their weight around lately, and mostly to good effect for consumers and users of mobile technology.