Mobility & Wireless » Opinions »

  • 'Parks And Recreation,' Facebook and The New Privacy

    If you tuned into Parks And Recreation Tuesday night, you were treated to an episode where social media startup Gryzzl attempts to win over the hearts and minds of its  new neighbors in the fictional town of Pawnee with boxes full of gifts, delivered via Amazon-esque drones.

  • HoloLens: Look who's innovating

    Poor, slow-footed old Microsoft. It just can't adapt to changing times or keep up with more innovative, agile and forward-looking companies like Apple and Google. That's been the way many of us have thought of Microsoft for a long time. But it may be our thinking that's old and outdated.

  • Why Surface Hub is more interesting than HoloLens

    Microsoft had an unusually kick-ass event this week. They trotted out the next version of Windows, which is called Windows 10.

  • Be prepared for the breach that's headed your way

    January 2015 is already winding down, but it's not too late to think about the lessons of 2014. For anyone in information security, 2014 was a year marked by spectacular breaches. It ended with Sony Pictures Entertainment getting its clock cleaned by hackers, quite possibly from North Korea. Wouldn't it be great if 2015 doesn't include the same sort of clock cleaning at your company?

  • Career advice: Asking for a raise

    Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader

  • Let's not make patent trolls stronger

    As you can tell by the name we've given them, patent trolls aren't popular critters. The game these operators play is shady and sleazy, bordering on extortion -- though it's completely legal. What they do is to purchase patents, with no intention of using or selling them, but rather to shake down as many people as possible by accusing them of violating the patent, even if the patent troll has no reason to believe that.

  • Why I'm still excited about Google Glass

    I love covering Google, because the company is unpredictable. They believe in crazy moon-shot projects and have the resources to pursue them. And they put stuff into the public eye way, way before it's ready for prime time.

  • Chromebooks spank Windows

    Last summer Microsoft talked its partners into trying to stop the growing popularity of Chromebooks in its tracks by making a big push during the holiday season. While full retail results won't be in for a while, we do know the laptop sales results from the most important retailer of them all, Amazon. Guess what. With that retailer at least, Microsoft and its buddies failed. Miserably.

  • Sony hack: Never underestimate the stupidity of criminals

    So who was really behind the Sony hack? And does it really matter?

  • Here comes the 'Internet of Self'

    Two of the biggest trends at International CES this year are the quantified self movement and the Internet of Things (IoT).

  • 2015: The year the Internet crashes. Hard.

    An Internet joke that goes back at least to the early 1980s consists entirely of the phrase: "Imminent Death of the Net Predicted!" Every year, even more often than you'd hear "This will be the year of the Linux desktop!" someone would predict that the Internet was going to go to hell in a handbasket -- and nothing happened. This year it's my turn, but I fear I'm going to be proved right.

  • Sony and Chase: Don't blame the CISO

    Over the last couple of weeks, I have read numerous news stories about the widely publicized security breaches at Sony and JPMorgan Chase. It seems as if everybody is a Monday-morning quarterback, with every other reporter voicing an opinion on how these breaches should have been prevented. In particular, I read two articles that specifically blamed the information security organizations at those companies for failing to properly stop the attackers. That's not fair.

  • Wearable technology isn't just for runners

    CES has a multitude of wearables out there for athletes, runners, bikers, long-distance hikers -- it's enough to make you tired just thinking about it. Last night, at the Pepcom press event, an eager PR guy asked me, "When you run, how often do you wonder how fast you're going?" Since the last time I ran anywhere, it was to catch a bus, I wasn't sure what to say.

  • 2015 is make or break for Microsoft

    This year we are finally going to get an answer to one of the big questions in the technology world. For years, people have been debating whether Microsoft will retain its position as one of the world's dominant tech companies or steadily become less relevant.

  • Hold the phone, McDonald's

    Mobile payments are supposed to be fast, easy and convenient. I knew when I pulled up at a McDonald's drive-through window the other day that the fast food giant's implementation of Apple Pay challenged. I just didn't know challenged it would be.

  • We can learn from the Sony hack

    Well that stinks, doesn't it? Sony Pictures goes and scrubs the launch of a $44 million movie after being hacked, potentially by North Korea. Almost reads more like a James Bond plot than a news story, but there it is. And this time, it doesn't seem likely that Bond, James Bond, is going to show up at the eleventh hour to save the day.

  • Why <i>The Interview</i> won't play in Peoria -- for now

    Maybe I should be outraged by Sony's decision not to distribute the movie The Interview, but I am merely saddened by it. I am saddened that a hacking incident with all the hallmarks of a simple case of extortion has been distorted so it looks like a terrorist threat.

  • Tech face-off: Apple's Mac Pro vs the 5K Retina iMac

    There used to be a time when the gap between Apple products made choosing the right computer obvious and easy. The deliberate compartmentalization of prices and features clearly dictated which laptop or deskop machine was right, with minimal overlap between the categories.

  • Apple v. Samsung and the road to patent sanity

    When Apple CEO Tim Cook unveiled the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus in September, amid the "oohs" and "ahs," some of us were thinking, "Wow, these stretched iPhones look a lot like Samsung's Galaxy devices."

  • Obama's Internet plan plays favorites, and Netflix is one of the darlings

    President Obama recently announced his plan to regulate the Internet under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act. This law nurtured America's telephone monopoly for 50 years. Under the president's plan, Internet service would be treated like a public utility, subject to rate regulation and state utilities commission oversight. The plan Obama proposes to prevent Internet service providers (ISP) from playing favorites with content ironically reveals him to be playing favorites with content providers such as Netflix.