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  • The surprising genius of Apple's Beats 1 radio

    When Apple announced it was creating an Internet radio station called Beats 1 to go along with its Apple Music service, I was dismissive.

  • Broadband for all

    There's no mere digital divide in the United States; it's a chasm. It ensures that the have-nots will always have less, and those with broadband access will have more. It's time to finally end that, and guarantee that everyone in the country, no matter how poor, gets broadband and its many benefits.

  • Nvidia asks Washington to sledgehammer smartphones

    Today's smartphone is more powerful than a supercomputer of just 20 years ago. It is an immensely complex device. In fact, more than one in six (16%) of all active U.S. patents are smartphone-related. Because of this complexity, smartphones for the last several years have been the epicenter of intellectual property disputes in high technology. Nearly every mobile, software, chip and Internet firm has been involved in some legal battle.

  • Finding your way around Apple's iOS 9

    Ever since the move away from skeuomorphics in version 7, iOS has been in a state of flux -- one that many iPhone and iPad users and reviewers noted came at the expense of stability. With iOS 9 due out in public beta next month and to the general public this Spring, Apple continues refining the appearance and behavior of the software that powers the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. And just as it's doing with OS X 10.11 El Capitan, Apple is adding a variety of under-the-hood improvements and new tricks that focus on proactivity, UI refinements, and best of all, stability and performance.

  • IT funding potholes

    Organizations should know how to budget and pay for IT products and services -- they've been doing so for more than 50 years. This is not rocket science. Unfortunately, many organizations continue to make the same mistakes year after year.

  • 4 news apps that will change everything

    I'm a huge fan of newspapers. I've been subscribing to the print edition of The New York Times since I was in college.

  • El Capitan's 5 biggest improvements

    When Apple execs took the stage last week for the company's annual World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC), they covered a lot of ground -- discussing changes to iOS 9, updates to watchOS, details about the company's music-streaming plans and specifics about OS X 10.11, better known as El Capitan. All three platforms will see improvements focused on performance, privacy and refinements when they arrive later this year.

  • Windows 10: Who will jump on the upgrade train?

    Windows 10 is looking pretty good. No, really!

  • Google on Apple: The end is near

    The chat room and social network religious wars between Apple and Google demand that you take sides. But I've always felt that the best experience includes a cherry-picking of Apple hardware, Google services and apps from both.

  • 5 questions you should be asking about the future

    I recently have been sounding ahead-of-the-curve executives about the questions we should be asking about the future. Here are five of particular importance.

  • Here comes the modular mobile revolution

    The future of consumer electronics will be delivered this year in a Puerto Rican food truck.

  • The Internet of Growing Things

    Earlier this month, in Monterey, Calif., a meeting organized by the Produce Marketing Association provided an opportunity for a group of local growers of crops such as lettuce, artichokes and strawberries to find out how the latest digital technologies were changing agriculture. Participants heard about how technologies like robots, drones and predictive analytics could help them improve their operations.

  • Why you want Google Photos

    We all love to take pictures. Smartphones make it easy.

  • Apple Pay's weakest link

    You're only as secure as your weakest link. That bit of wisdom has hit home for Apple Pay of late. Fraudsters have wasted no time finding and exploiting the mobile payment system's weak link to their advantage.

  • How Google and Apple will smartify your home

    The next big culture shift in consumer technology is clearly home automation. Over the next two or three years, a dizzying array of home appliances and devices will connect up with your phone and TV box to make everything "smart" (which, let's face it, is a euphemism for "more fun but also more expensive and complex").

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • Verizon's buy of AOL would offer edge against Google, Facebook on mobile ads

    In the Internet era, many multibillion-dollar acquisitions sound insanely ambitious and out of line.

  • The Apple Watch and our cyborg future

    My first week of wearing the Apple Watch has transformed my thinking about the direction of mobile and wearable computing.

  • Broadband is like a river (but not the way you think)

    In his 2014 book, The Accidental Superpower, Peter Zeihan traces the origins of America's economic prosperity to its abundance of rivers. The U.S. has more miles of navigable waterways, which provide a uniquely efficient and inexpensive means for transporting goods across a continent, than the rest of the world put together. According to Zeihan, this difference was a critical factor in the country's emergence as the world's leading superpower. And because rivers do not require large-scale efforts to build and operate, they favor decentralized development, which has encouraged local entrepreneurs, who represent a distinctive aspect of the U.S. economy. The U.S. is also blessed with many natural harbors that are another major contributor to a country's economic success.

  • How new haptics tech will move you

    Now that the Apple Watch is finally out in the wild, millions will be experiencing the next big thing for user interfaces. Call it "haptics plus."