Mobility & Wireless » Opinions »

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Bye, Nokia, nice knowing you

    Nokia, once a great company and the pride of Finland, is shuffling to its grave under Microsoft's leadership.

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    Preston Gralla: Jeff Bezos hates you

    But he's quite fond of your credit card.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

  • Apple and IBM: A winning combo for IT

    One thing is clear about the Apple-IBM partnership: It will change the dynamic of the enterprise mobility market in significant ways.

  • Timeline: How Apple's iOS gained enterprise cred

    In the seven years since the first iPhone arrived, iOS has morphed from a consumer-centric OS into one with a wealth of enterprise-worthy features.

  • The benefits of converged network and application performance management

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Career advice: 3 up and coming IT roles

    Premier 100 IT Leader William Mayo also answers questions on combining international teams and the skills needed to become a CIO.

  • 5 things you no longer need to do for mobile security

    A couple of years ago companies were dismissive of BYOD, but as they've realized that the horse left the stable, they are adopting policies and next generation technologies to help manage BYOD. They also recognize that successful mobile security requires a cooperative partnership with employees, so are working with them to determine what policy works best for both parties, allowing BYOD to become part of the enterprise mobile security framework.

  • Board of directors will have a profound impact on cybersecurity

    According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, corporate boards are getting much more involved in cybersecurity. What's driving this behavior? While the Target breach probably influenced this behavior, corporate boards now realize that cybersecurity has become a pervasive risk that could have an adverse impact on all businesses.

  • Bankers beware: Technology is going to get you (and none of us will care)

    Technology is about to take a big slice of the traditional banking business. Bankers have been slow to see what's coming, but they're starting to realize what's at stake.

  • WIth iWatch looming, Microsoft plans its own fitness wearable as Woz tosses aside his Galaxy Gear

    With the iWatch rumoured to launch sometime this fall, competitors like Microsoft aren't sitting idly by. According to a recent report from longtime Microsoft watcher, Paul Thurrott, the folks in Redmond are prepping their own wearable device that will have a decidedly fitness oriented bent.

  • Why Google bought Songza: The music industry's third revolution

    Pandora and Spotify sparked a music revolution of sorts when they began convincing consumers that they did not need to own their music to enjoy it. Mobile analytics firm Flurry's CEO Simon Khalaf noted in a talk he gave at Source 14 that MP3 purchases were declining while streamed consumption was exploding.

  • iFixIt giving away 15K iPhone ‘liberation kits'

    Having been so widely saluted last year, the folks at iFixIt have declared today through the Fourth of July to be "Liberation Week" for iPhone owners, 15,000 of whom can receive for free a special tool needed to get at the innards of an iPhone.

  • Promise Theory

    The way we have created IT systems over the years has been very linear with each individual component being statically configured. If a human makes an error in any one of the many configurations, then the whole system breaks down. Over the years, IT systems have become increasingly complex with multiple layers of abstraction and virtualization making it difficult to enforce stability and gain scalability. Promise theory provides a new way to think about how IT systems rely on each other to form an entire system that businesses can depend. This article will cover the foundation concept of promise theory and give examples of how it is used.

  • And there's something else wrong with Comcast's Xfinity customer-based Wi-Fi hotspot plan ...

    I have, in previous Gearhead articles (first in Comcast's latest bad idea turns your Wi-Fi into everybody's Wi-Fi and then in Revisiting Comcast's Xfinity public hotspot strategy), discussed Comcast's strategy for implementing opt-out Wi-Fi hotspots on their customers' Xfinity gateways. In the latter post I questioned the security of the service and noted that access to the Comcast service isn't as tightly controlled as the company might think.

  • Why Android Wear is the new iPad

    Columnist Mike Elgan tested a smartwatch with Android Wear and said he has experienced a culture-changing platform.

  • Turning network resource management on its head through software-defined WANs

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • iPhone 6 rumour rollup for the week ending June 27

    We can now count the days until Winter ends in September with the expected unveiling of the iPhone 6. Pavlovian-like, the iOSphere seemed to salivate over a renewed spate of rumors, as if hearing them for the first time.

  • A curmudgeonly view of Yo

    Perhaps I'm growing curmudgeonly as I get older, but I simply don't get the latest app flavor of the month. Known as Yo, all this little piffle does is let you say "Yo" to individuals among a set of followers, just to let them know you're thinking about them (or to be annoying).

  • 100Mb/sec Ethernet coming to a car near you?

    As more and more infotainment and crash avoidance technology gets stuffed to cars and trucks, the need for better, faster and more reliable in-car networking equipment grows. In theory at least.