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  • Fave Raves 2015: What's your favorite enterprise IT product?

    Do you have a favorite enterprise IT product you can't live without? Tell us about it and we'll share your raves with our readers. (Here's a link to last year's Fave Raves collection.)

  • Confessions of a technobiophiliac

    Smartphone makers like Apple, Samsung and others have flirted with different materials to make their smartphones -- metal, plastic, even glass front and back with the iPhone 4 line.

  • Rating the payment options

    Several electronic and mobile payment options have become available, but most of us in the U.S. are still using plain-vanilla credit and debit cards with magnetic stripes. They use technology that dates to the first Nixon administration. That's not a problem in itself; I have no problem with time-tested security measures that work effectively. But just look around: Data breaches are everywhere, and those magnetic-stripe cards are often implicated.

  • Tech toys train tots for a troubling tomorrow

    Toys always reflect the larger culture -- its biases, fears and, most of all, its technology. New York's Toy Fair 2015 happened this week, and the latest round of new tech toys is bringing some of the most disturbing tech trends to children.

  • Why Apple is the most successful company in history

    Everyone knows that Apple had a great fourth quarter and that its most successful product line, the iPhone, is doing better than ever, too.

  • The ‘sophisticated attack' myth

    Sometimes I wonder whether any company will ever fall victim to an unsophisticated cyberattack. Because after every attack that comes to light, we hear that same excuse: It was a sophisticated attack.

  • Protect yourself from hackers and the NSA

    The downside of email, chat, text and messaging apps is that they make you feel like you're communicating privately, with only the intended recipients. And that your messages are private. Until they're not.

  • The Apple Watch conundrum revisited

    Two years ago, I asked Creative Strategies analyst Ben Bajarin and curiousrat.com's Harry Marks -- both of them experts in all things Apple -- to share their ideas on what a successful mass-market wearable would be. In a world of smartphones, tablets, notebooks and miscellaneous gadgets, would there be a mass-market audience for yet another device to charge and keep track of? And would a smartwatch from Apple be disruptive enough to matter?

  • It's time for the chip-and-PIN'ing of America

    Thank goodness for that signature on the back of my credit card. If it weren't for that smudged scrawl, a thief might steal my card (or card number) and make fraudulent purchases. Or steal my identity. Right.

  • Can you trust Amazon's WorkMail?

    When Amazon unveiled its cloud-based corporate WorkMail email offering last week (Jan. 28), it stressed the high-level of encryption it would use and the fact that corporate users would control their own decryption keys. But Amazon neglected to mention that it will retain full access to those messages -- along with the ability to both analyze data for e-commerce marketing and to give data to law enforcement should subpoenas show up.

  • Career advice: Are government jobs technological backwaters?

    Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader

  • 7 smartphone rules changed this week

    Federal regulators have been throwing their weight around lately, and mostly to good effect for consumers and users of mobile technology.

  • 'Parks And Recreation,' Facebook and The New Privacy

    If you tuned into Parks And Recreation Tuesday night, you were treated to an episode where social media startup Gryzzl attempts to win over the hearts and minds of its  new neighbors in the fictional town of Pawnee with boxes full of gifts, delivered via Amazon-esque drones.

  • HoloLens: Look who's innovating

    Poor, slow-footed old Microsoft. It just can't adapt to changing times or keep up with more innovative, agile and forward-looking companies like Apple and Google. That's been the way many of us have thought of Microsoft for a long time. But it may be our thinking that's old and outdated.

  • Why Surface Hub is more interesting than HoloLens

    Microsoft had an unusually kick-ass event this week. They trotted out the next version of Windows, which is called Windows 10.

  • Be prepared for the breach that's headed your way

    January 2015 is already winding down, but it's not too late to think about the lessons of 2014. For anyone in information security, 2014 was a year marked by spectacular breaches. It ended with Sony Pictures Entertainment getting its clock cleaned by hackers, quite possibly from North Korea. Wouldn't it be great if 2015 doesn't include the same sort of clock cleaning at your company?

  • Career advice: Asking for a raise

    Ask a Premier 100 IT Leader

  • Let's not make patent trolls stronger

    As you can tell by the name we've given them, patent trolls aren't popular critters. The game these operators play is shady and sleazy, bordering on extortion -- though it's completely legal. What they do is to purchase patents, with no intention of using or selling them, but rather to shake down as many people as possible by accusing them of violating the patent, even if the patent troll has no reason to believe that.

  • Why I'm still excited about Google Glass

    I love covering Google, because the company is unpredictable. They believe in crazy moon-shot projects and have the resources to pursue them. And they put stuff into the public eye way, way before it's ready for prime time.

  • Chromebooks spank Windows

    Last summer Microsoft talked its partners into trying to stop the growing popularity of Chromebooks in its tracks by making a big push during the holiday season. While full retail results won't be in for a while, we do know the laptop sales results from the most important retailer of them all, Amazon. Guess what. With that retailer at least, Microsoft and its buddies failed. Miserably.