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  • Apple Pay's weakest link

    You're only as secure as your weakest link. That bit of wisdom has hit home for Apple Pay of late. Fraudsters have wasted no time finding and exploiting the mobile payment system's weak link to their advantage.

  • How Google and Apple will smartify your home

    The next big culture shift in consumer technology is clearly home automation. Over the next two or three years, a dizzying array of home appliances and devices will connect up with your phone and TV box to make everything "smart" (which, let's face it, is a euphemism for "more fun but also more expensive and complex").

  • Europe's war against U.S. tech is wrongheaded

    What do Facebook, Apple, Google, Amazon and Netflix have in common? In addition to being U.S. tech giants, they're in the crosshairs of European regulators and may face big fines and stiff rules reining in the way they operate on the continent.

  • Verizon's buy of AOL would offer edge against Google, Facebook on mobile ads

    In the Internet era, many multibillion-dollar acquisitions sound insanely ambitious and out of line.

  • The Apple Watch and our cyborg future

    My first week of wearing the Apple Watch has transformed my thinking about the direction of mobile and wearable computing.

  • Broadband is like a river (but not the way you think)

    In his 2014 book, The Accidental Superpower, Peter Zeihan traces the origins of America's economic prosperity to its abundance of rivers. The U.S. has more miles of navigable waterways, which provide a uniquely efficient and inexpensive means for transporting goods across a continent, than the rest of the world put together. According to Zeihan, this difference was a critical factor in the country's emergence as the world's leading superpower. And because rivers do not require large-scale efforts to build and operate, they favor decentralized development, which has encouraged local entrepreneurs, who represent a distinctive aspect of the U.S. economy. The U.S. is also blessed with many natural harbors that are another major contributor to a country's economic success.

  • How new haptics tech will move you

    Now that the Apple Watch is finally out in the wild, millions will be experiencing the next big thing for user interfaces. Call it "haptics plus."

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."

  • Target's under-stocked sale: Lessons not learned

    In retail -- and especially in e-commerce -- there's a nuanced distinction between having a very popular sale and arranging for far too little merchandise. It's like those hold recordings that say the lengthy hold time is because of high customer call volume, prompting most people to mumble, "That and the fact that you're too cheap to hire enough call center operators."

  • Sony reminds us all what a pathetically weak link email is

    Sony is reliving the nightmare that its hacked databases gave rise to late last year, now that Wikileaks has thoughtfully published all of the leaked documents in a searchable database. Really, they are the most courteous hoodlums ever.

  • Inside Apple's future iPhone camera

    I've got an iPhone 6 Plus, and there's no getting around an obvious fact: The camera is pretty great.

  • Canadian banks play hard ball with Apple Pay's moving north

    Apple Pay is poised to cross the border into Canada this fall, but some Canadian banks are reportedly concerned that Apple wants a bigger cut of each transaction than it takes in the U.S.

  • Discovering a blind eye to vulnerabilities

    Last week, I was horrified to discover a problem with my vulnerability scanner. The product I use relies on a user account to connect to our Microsoft Windows servers and workstations to check them for vulnerable versions of software, and that user account had never been configured properly. As a result, the scanner has been blind to a lot of vulnerabilities. And this has been going on for a long time.

  • What is artificial intelligence?

    What is artificial intelligence (AI), and what is the difference between general AI and narrow AI?

  • Finally, it's Apple Watch time

    It's almost time.

  • Tech's peculiar relationship with social justice

    Tech giants including Salesforce, Apple and Yelp have been out front in their criticism of the new law in Indiana that allows businesses to discriminate against gay customers. That criticism is a good thing. Businesses have a role in not just selling things to people, but in doing good and in making sure that companies and the marketplace operate equitably. And it's right that technology companies are leading the fight against the Indiana law, because tech is the most forward-looking of industries.

  • Three lies about Google Glass

    Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt shocked everyone last week by telling The Wall Street Journal that Google isn't killing Google Glass.

  • iOS 8 hate

    Enough is enough. Apple's iOS 8 mobile operating system came out in mid-September. Since then, the company has delivered seven -- count 'em, seven -- patch releases, and iOS 8 still doesn't work that well. Argh!

  • Microsoft Outlook Calendar Corruption, Lost Meetings, Duplicate Appointments - April/2015 Update

    Over the past 5-yrs, organizations have complained about Microsoft Outlook calendaring problems where users describe issues of calendar appointments not showing up, meeting appointments disappearing, calendar delegate issues occurring, just overall "odd" behavior of calendars. It usually happens in mixed environments where some users are Apple Mac users, and some users (frequently the exec admin / delegate) running Windows, and typically active use of iPhones, iPads, Android, or other mobile devices and tablets. And over the past 5-yrs, I have actively blogged about the problem and the solution to FIX the calendaring inconsistencies.

  • We've got net neutrality. Now the real work begins.

    Now that net neutrality is the law of the land, you may feel inclined to pat yourself on the back for a job well done. After all, a big reason the FCC backed net neutrality was the outpouring of support for it.