Mobility & Wireless » Interviews »

  • EMC CEO defends federated business model, debunks storage myths

    There's EMC and then there's EMC.

  • Cisco describes its SDN vision: A Q&A with Soni Jiandani

    Soni Jiandani is one of Cisco's serial entrepreneurs, having been a key member of the teams that developed everything from the Nexus 5000 to Cisco's Unified Computing System (which in five years has leapt to the top of the x86 blade server market in North America, according to IDC). Today Jiandani is Senior Vice President of Cisco's Insieme business unit, the group pushing the company's Software Defined Networking vision. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught with Jiandani to get her take on how SDN plays out.

  • The future of networking is a NOS on your choice of bare metal, says Cumulus Networks

    If Cumulus Networks has its way, companies will use its Cumulus Linux to decouple the network operating system from the hardware and break free of the integrated approach that has driven the industry for decades. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix talked about the vision with Co-Founder and CEO JR Rivers.

  • Q&A: 3D gun maker Cody Wilson defends freedom to print guns

    Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, contests claims his 3D printed gun isn't safe and will try to continue to make 3D gun plans available.

  • Healthcare provider finds SDN is the proper Rx

    William Hanna, vice president of technical services at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), went out looking for a way to add capacity to a backup network and found what he wanted in Software Defined Networking (SDN) tools from Alcatel-Lucent. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix sat down with Hanna to learn about the process and experience.

  • Ex-Cisco CEO reflects, looks ahead on 25 years of Networkers

    John Morgridge was Cisco's first CEO. He took the company public and presided over its growth until John Chambers took over as CEO in 1995. On the 25th anniversary of the Networker's user conference this week, Morgridge, 80, reflects on the past and looks ahead to the future as Cisco's Chairman Emeritus.

  • There's no bubble in business Wi-Fi, Aerohive CEO says

    Aerohive Networks sells not just enterprise Wi-Fi gear but also cloud-based software designed to make it easier to set up and manage a customer's entire wired and wireless network. Other wireless LAN vendors are moving in the same direction, including Cisco Systems, the biggest seller of enterprise Wi-Fi, which acquired Meraki Networks in 2012.

  • Competing on multiple fronts helps Broadcom, CEO McGregor says

    Broadcom got a jump on Mobile World Congress this week, announcing two steps forward in its fledgling LTE silicon business. On Monday, the company introduced a turnkey solution for LTE smartphones to be priced under US$300. On Tuesday, it announced a test, on a live carrier network in Finland, of a high-end handset chip that can use so-called Category 6 LTE with speeds as high as 300Mbps (bits per second).

  • Mobile chip speed wars have to end, Broadcom chairman says

    The chip industry is in for major changes in the coming years, according to Broadcom Chairman and Chief Technical Officer, Henry Samueli.

  • Intel President James on wearable tech, Microsoft partnership

    After calculators, PCs and mobile phones, Intel is now jumping into wearable devices with an extremely low-power chip called Quark, which was big news at the company's annual Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco. Leading the charge into the new market is Intel's new leadership team consisting of CEO Brian Krzanich and President Renee James, who also articulated on plans to achieve fast growth in the mobile market while trying to reinvigorate PC sales.

  • Good Technology CEO: 'We focus on the data, not the device'

    Good Technology has become one the leaders in mobile management, amassing more than 4,000 customers, including many in government and highly regulated industries.

  • You can't make it run better if you don't know where the problem lies

    Riverbed Technology is best known for its WAN optimization tools, but the company has branched out over the years through multiple acquisitions. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Eric Wolford, president of the company's Products Group, to see how the company is trying to help customers squeeze more efficiency out of their IT resources.

  • Cloud computing causing rethinking of disaster recovery

    Cloud computing gives organisations the opportunity to rethink many traditional IT practices, but it may be a particularly good fit for disaster recovery and business continuity.

  • SDN: The user view

    It is still early days in the emergence of software defined networking, so there aren't many users around to share their experiences and expectations, but there are a few. Network World's editor in chief tracked down Steve Wallace, executive director of InCNTRE, Indiana University's Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education, which is already using the technology in a production environment. The school is also playing a role in the tech's evolution.

  • Google making steady progress in the enterprise

    Google Enterprise is making inroads on many fronts, winning converts to everything from its productivity tools to its cloud offerings. We recently caught up with President of Google Enterprise, Amit Singh, for a progress report and to discuss what comes next.

  • Oracle's Mark Hurd talks Fusion Applications, customer satisfaction and SAP's HANA

    As co-president of Oracle, Mark Hurd is tasked with selling an ever-increasing array of new software and hardware products, such as the Exadata database machine and Fusion Applications, while figuring out how to keep the company's vast installed base happy and fending off competition from the likes of SAP.

  • UEFI president: We need more key providers

    Since its introduction, the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface has created a fair amount of controversy. UEFI was created through an industry consortium as an evolutionary step up from BIOS, the simple firmware long used when starting a computer to initialize all the components and load the operating system. Among its advanced features, UEFI includes an option called Secure Boot, which requires that any software used before the operating system starts, or after it shuts down, has been signed by a certificate authority.

  • The Grill: Orlando Health CIO Rick Schooler's vision of healthcare IT

    Orlando Health VP and CIO Rick Schooler talks about how analytics is transforming healthcare. Insider (registration required)

  • 10 questions for WellDoc CFO Jon Brilliant

    Name: Jon Brilliant

  • 10 questions for Layer 7 Technologies CTO Scott Morrison

    Name: Scott Morrison