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  • All signs point to the demise of Microsoft's Surface tablet

    Microsoft seems to be within a whisker of calling it quits on its failed experiment with the Surface tablet, the device powered by the ARM architecture and Windows RT, an offshoot of Windows 8.

  • Is the ASUS X205 Microsoft's Chromebook killer?

    The ASUS X205 is one of three Windows 8.1 notebooks, all released in November, designed to halt the encroachment of Chromebooks into the low-end Windows notebook market. (The other two are the HP Stream 11 and HP Stream 13.)

  • Linus Torvalds diversity gaffe brings out the best (and worst) of the open source world

    It all started at the Linux.conf.au Conference, when Nebula developer (and former colleague) Matthew Garrett kicked off a post-keynote Q&A session with Linux kernel creator Linus Torvalds by asking about his often-abrasive, super-aggressive tone on official mailing lists.

  • Which mobile data provider is best? (And will you make a switch?)

    What do you use a smartphone for most? For its data, of course. So we set out for the second year in a row to find out which mobile service provider gives you the most comprehensive and reliable data network coverage, the fastest upload and download speeds, and overall, the most bang for the buck.

  • Debunking SSD Myths

      By now everyone is aware of the performance leap offered by solid-state drives (SSDs) compared to hard disk drives (HDDs), but some SSD myths persist. It's time to separate fact from fiction.

  • 10th time's the charm: Microsoft finally solves big problems with Surface Pro 3

    Judging by many comments on the Microsoft Answers forum and elsewhere, Microsoft's Jan. 15 firmware update for the Surface Pro 3 has solved almost all outstanding issues with Wi-Fi connections, hibernating, Bluetooth connectivity, battery drain on standby, Hyper-V interference with Wi-Fi, and more.

  • Premier 100 Alumni, 2000 - 2015

    Our Premier 100 IT Leaders Awards honor individuals who have had a positive impact on their organization through technology. Honored individuals manage internal IT organizations, mentor and motivate their IT teams with interesting challenges, envision innovative solutions to business problems and effectively manage and execute IT strategies. Computerworld's Premier 100 IT Leaders issue, published each year, highlights the accomplishments of the honorees.

  • Preview: Microsoft Office for Android makes up for (some) lost time

    It may be about four years late to the game, but Microsoft is finally ready to bring its Office suite to Android tablets -- well, almost.

  • 2015 IT Data Center Infrastructure Convergence Predictions

    IT infrastructure is constantly riding the often-tumultuous waves of consolidation and separation. A typical example would be the eras of mainframe, open systems, and PC computing. No surprise there. For the past three to five years, server virtualization has been a catalyst for data center consolidation, (even though for the most part, IT has mapped server virtualization initiatives to existing IT infrastructure choices, or dare I say legacy infrastructure).

  • Four ways for IT to connect better with customers

    If you walk by an IT office these days, the only sounds you're likely to hear are the dull whir of laptop fans and the gentle hum of servers -- barely a warm body to be found. The IT staff is on the loose.

  • Lessons from the Sony breach in risk management and business resiliency

    2014 made it clear that cybercrime affects everyone. From retailers to banks, consumer goods companies and health care, there isn't an industry left untouched by cybercriminals looking to disrupt, steal or embarrass. So what has to change? The recent Sony attack and countless other examples point to the need for board members and executives to consider cybersecurity under the concept of risk management and business resilience.

  • Big names like Google dominate open-source funding

    Network World's analysis of publicly listed sponsors of 36 prominent open-source non-profits and foundations reveals that the lion's share of financial support for open-source groups comes from a familiar set of names.

  • The 8080 chip at 40: What's next for the mighty microprocessor?

    It came out in 1974 and was the basis of the MITS Altair 8800, for which two guys named Bill Gates and Paul Allen wrote BASIC, and millions of people began to realize that they, too, could have their very own, personal, computer.

  • Will enhanced servers do away with need for switches?

    As more and more servers are virtualized, connections between them are increasingly handled by virtual switches running on the same servers, begging the question, does the top of rack data center network switchultimately get subsumed into the server?

  • Frustrated by new tech?

    LAS VEGAS -- International CES boasts 3,500 vendors this year, many showing off new smartwatches and other wearable gadgets.

  • 10 lessons U.S. tech managers can learn from their counterparts in China

    China is on a technological roll these days -- one that American companies ignore at their own peril. Contrary to outdated Western perceptions, 680 million Chinese have access to either a laptop or a mobile phone, and some 95% of homes in every city in China are now wired for the Internet, according to figures from the Chinese government.

  • IT pro's revitalization guide 2015

    For seasoned and new IT leaders alike, the new year is a good excuse to pause and take stock of your professional and personal progress in our always interesting, always chaotic industry.

  • The rise of China's smartphone makers

    After Apple and Samsung, which companies are selling the most smartphones around the globe?

  • Frequently asked questions about the North Korean Internet incident

    News of North Korea's Internet outage was widely covered in the media on Monday of this week, and while a number of questions remain about what happened and who was responsible, speculation has it that North Korea was hit by a DDoS attach."

  • Decisions, decisions: Choices abound as data center architecture options expand

    When the American Red Cross talks about mission-critical systems, it's referring to the blood supply that helps save lives. The non-profit organization manages 40% of the U.S.'s blood supply, so stability, reliability and tight security are of paramount concern, says DeWayne Bell, vice president of IT infrastructure and engineering.