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  • 7 reasons Apple should open-source Swift -- and 7 reasons it won't

    Faster innovation, better security, new markets -- the case for opening Swift might be more compelling than Apple will admit

  • 10 years in tech: The crazy cellphone ideas of 2004

    A year is a long time in smartphone technology today, so remember if you can the changes that have taken place over the last decade.

  • 7 questions following #AppleLive

    Apple's Tim Cook has kicked back against critics with new iPhones, the Apple Watch and future big business, Apple Pay, but there are some questions for Apple fans:

  • Incremental SDN: Automating Network Device Configuration

    The definition of Software Defined Networking (SDN) continues to broaden, today including functions such as configuration automation and orchestration. While these tasks aren't strictly SDN, the fact is software is used to define some aspect of the network infrastructure in both cases, so vendors have stretched the definition of SDN to bring configuration automation and orchestration platforms into the mix. In fairness, the line gets blurry, as some modern orchestration systems use programmatic interfaces to provision the network instead of traditional configuration tools such as SSH or SNMP.

  • Apple to expand, recast iPhone portfolio today

    Apple will restructure its 2014-15 iPhone portfolio today, analysts said, by dumping the iPhone 5C experiment but keeping the three-year-old iPhone 4S to sell at even lower prices in markets such as India.

  • A common theme in identity and access management failure: lack of Active Directory optimization

    From the vantage point of most people, even technical folks, Active Directory (AD) seems like it's doing pretty well. How often can you not log in when you sit down at your PC? How often do you fail to find someone in the corporate directory in Outlook? How many times have you heard of an AD outage?

  • Gear VR may thrill gamers, but value to Samsung and business is unclear

    Samsung's announcement of the Galaxy Note 4, Galaxy Note Edge and especially the Gear VR virtual reality headset raised questions over whether the new devices can help correct the company's lackluster first half financials, which were partly blamed on slow Galaxy S 5 sales.

  • Germany's IFA show, debut ground for numerous new products, hits 90 years old

    When German radio manufacturers gathered in 1924 to show off their products, just a year after regular broadcasting began in the country, they probably didn't imagine they were sowing the seeds for what eventually would become IFA.

  • Boston's Bolt launches hardware companies

    Watch the first episode in our new series Breakout Startups here.

  • Here goes the Apple vs. Samsung smartwatch showdown

    Fast follower

  • Apple's 12-inch iPad makes no sense at all!

    Apple intends introducing a 12.9-inch iPad model, and there's some who may think doing so makes no sense at all. They're wrong. Here's why:

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    Meet Cobol's hard core fans

    Some of the world's largest businesses say their Cobol application infrastructure, running on state-of-the-art big iron, still delivers a powerful competitive advantage. The challenge going forward will be staffing it.

  • Even rivals are waiting for Apple to get into wearables

    There may be big expectations for the wearables market, but the reality is that until someone transforms the category -- Apple's the usual suspect -- it won't break out of a very small constituency.

  • Sprint's cut in data prices won't help its network woes

    Sprint's new lower-priced shared data plan sounds ambitious, but analysts say it doesn't go far enough and won't address the carrier's network performance sore spot.

  • Supervalu breach shows why move to smartcards is long overdue

    The data breach disclosed by Supervalu is another reminder about why the ongoing migration of the US payment system to smartcard technology can't happen fast enough.

  • How risky will it be to run old IE after Microsoft's 2016 patch stoppage?

    Microsoft's decision to stop patching older versions of Internet Explorer in 17 months may not be as big a show-stopper as many assume.

  • IoT is here and there, but not everywhere yet

    The Internet of Things is still too hard. Even some of its biggest backers say so.

  • 3D printing makes its move into production

    The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition.

  • How Claure can fix Sprint as it battles T-Mobile

    What can incoming Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure do to reverse the carrier's declining subscriber base?

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    Microsoft wants you to forget Windows 8

    Unless MIcrosoft radically changes its habits, it will throw Windows 8 down a deep memory hole even before a successor ships.