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  • What's the future for Windows Phone?

    Despite rumors that Microsoft is about to kill Windows Phone, some industry observers say that's unlikely for several reasons, especially the expected gains from the rollout of Windows 10, which will run on smartphones and other devices.

  • Inside the bold plan to bring gigabit fiber to Detroit

    When discussing the ongoing revitalization efforts in Detroit, it's hard to miss the name Dan Gilbert. The founder of Quicken Loans, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, and a Detroit native himself, Gilbert's investment firms have funded dozens of tech startups in the city and turned its defunct old buildings into shiny new workspaces that look like Silicon Valley transplants.

  • Read CW's new July digital magazine!

    Download the Computerworld Digital Magazine!

  • 5 reasons you're going to want Apple's next iPhone

    Apple is cooking up such an iPhone upgrade path, with a wave of rumors warning the next iteration will be faster, thinner, and possibly even curvier than before.

  • Clear as mud: Microsoft struggles to define 'free' for Windows 10

    Microsoft's Keystone Kops-like revelation that Windows 10 testers would get a free copy of the OS -- yes, no, then yes, probably, but with strings -- may be confusing compared to Apple's approach to OS X, but reflects the much more complicated ecosystem the Redmond, Wash. company maintains.

  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

  • The No. 1 midsize place to work in IT: Credit Acceptance

    Six months after arriving at Credit Acceptance Corp. as a contract tech support analyst, Chris Thomas hired on as a full-time employee. He hasn't looked back.

  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.

  • How we chose the Best Places to Work in IT 2015

    For the 22nd year in a row, Computerworld conducted a survey to identify the 100 best places to work for IT professionals. As we first did in 2014, this year we once again present the top organization data sorted by size.

  • Tour the three No. 1 Best Places

    Competition was fierce this year to determine Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT. In a white-hot jobs market, organizations are pulling out the stops to attract and retain talented, visionary tech workers.

  • Top firms for training, retention, benefits and career development

    Organizations make it onto Computerworld's 100 Best Places to Work in IT list by excelling in training, benefits, retention and career development, among other attributes.

  • Wearables for workplace wellness face federal scrutiny

    Federal regulators are weighing reforms to widespread workplace wellness programs that could affect how personal data from consumer-grade fitness bands and smartwatches is kept confidential.

  • Tech Media Watch: HBO's "Silicon Valley" set to wrap 2nd season – it won't be "Game Of Thrones"-esque but it'll do

    The far-and-away best satire of the technology industry on TV airs the last episode of its second season Sunday night, and you really should be watching. Silicon Valley has continued to bring the funny throughout the second set of episodes, and the finale looks like it's leading up to a fairly insane climax.

  • Hot skills alert: Tips for landing a plum project manager's job

    Karen Klein had a typical entrance into the project management profession, evolving into the role after working her way up the IT ranks.

  • MEDJACK: Hackers hijacking medical devices to create backdoors in hospital networks

    After the Office of Personnel Management breach, medical data was labeled as the "holy grail" for cybercriminals intent on espionage. "Medical information can be worth 10 times as much as a credit card number," reported Reuters. And now to steal such information, hospital networks are getting pwned by malware-infected medical devices.

  • Does Fortinet's Meru buy mean we're in for even more Wi-Fi industry consolidation?

    Cybersecurity firm Fortinet's purchase last week of wireless network manufacturer Meru Networks for $44 million is the second major acquisition of a Wi-Fi hardware vendor in three months and, potentially, the start of a broader pattern.

  • Videoconferencing do's and don'ts (with video!)

    When it comes to videoconferencing, Daniel Post Senning would like to remind you the game is yours to win -- or lose. "Your ability to handle and manage [videoconferencing] tools says something about your professional brand and who you are," says Senning, author of Emily Post's Manners in a Digital World, Living Well Online and spokesperson with The Emily Post Institute. And that includes not just your technical savvy, but your social skills as well, Senning says.

  • Microsoft can't kick the OS-for-money habit

    Old habits die hard.

  • 9 ways to make the most of your Android device

    When you stop and think about it, the word "smartphone" is starting to sound a little stale.

  • Android Pay likely at Google I/O as Samsung preps its own service

    Google is expected to reveal details about Android Pay at its annual I/O conference this week, even as Samsung readies its own separate mobile payment service.

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