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  • No new Lumia flagship? Smart move, Microsoft

    Microsoft's decision to wait until Windows 10 arrives to deliver a high-end Lumia smartphone may have irked some of the company's loyal customers, but it was the smart move, according to analysts.

  • Samsung's grand obsession with the iPhone

    BARCELONA: Is Samsung obsessed with out-doing the Apple iPhone? Not exactly, but it's a fair question.

  • Will network disaggregation play in the enterprise?

    Disaggregation seems to be all the rage in networking these days.

  • What does the FCC's net neutrality vote mean?

    Net neutrality has been debated for a decade, but the Federal Communications Commission's historic vote on Thursday signals only the beginning of further battles and likely lawsuits.

  • Premier 100 IT Leader: Ryan Boone

    Ryan Boone has a simple philosophy for blending IT with the business at discount retailer Dollar General: "Do the work."

  • How the 2015 Computerworld Premier 100 IT Leaders were chosen

    Each year, Computerworld accepts nominations from across the industry -- from vendors, IT users, public relations and marketing professionals, Computerworld readers and past Premier 100 IT Leaders honorees. Eligible nominees include CIOs, CTOs, senior vice presidents, vice presidents, IT directors and managers from a cross-section of user and vendor companies and their IT divisions, including but not limited to professionals in network management, database management, Web management, help desk operations, application development, project management, contract management and procurement.

  • Premier 100 IT Leaders: Primed for business

    Mike Jennings knows a thing or two about fast-paced businesses and demanding customers. As the former senior director of IT at LinkedIn and now the head of IT at Airbnb, Jennings is used to a neo-startup environment where the speed of business is breakneck and the customer -- who is both tech-savvy and exacting -- is king.

  • 5 keys to successful SIP implementation

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • President's cyber security summit: Share attack info but protect privacy, civil liberties

    Participants in the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection on Friday called for government/private sector information sharing, updated regulations, and improving the trust citizens have in the government's respect for privacy and civil liberties.

  • Security Manager's Journal: Breaches are everywhere

    Follow me, if you will, on a journey back in time to just one year ago. As 2013 turned into 2014, the information security industry was buzzing about the latest spate of breaches. Target had ushered in a new era of retail security breaches, with 40 million card numbers lost to the hackers. Little did we know at the time that this was just the beginning, and small potatoes in comparison to what was to come. One year ago, Neiman Marcus and Michaels had joined Target, and I wrote in response to the growing number of breach disclosures that "in fact, I have to wonder which retailers have not suffered breaches. The word on the street is that at least a half-dozen other retailers were compromised in the past few months, without publicity." Sadly, this turned out to be true. I hate being right all the time.

  • Debunking the myths about scale-up architectures

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • NSA approves Samsung and Boeing mobile devices for employee use

    As part of the NSA's program to certify commercial off-the-shelf technology for use inside the agency, mobile devices from Samsung and Boeing have been cleared for use by NSA employees.

  • IT jobs market booming in the Southwest

    2015 IT Salary & Jobs Regional Report: The Southwest

  • 18 ways to get the most out of Android 5.0

    Got Lollipop? Google's Android 5.0 operating system is slowly but surely making its way to devices around the world -- and like any major OS upgrade, it brings with it a whole new set of options, features, and shortcuts to master.

  • After Wheeler unveils proposal, what's next for net neutrality?

    A flurry of activity will follow the plan from U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to reclassify broadband as a regulated public utility as the foundation for new net neutrality rules.

  • It's a bird, it's a plane, it's the rebirth of satellite Internet

    SpaceX, Facebook, Virgin Galactic and Google have all announced major initiatives that would help connect the world -- especially developing nations -- to the Internet. But the next thing in worldwide connectivity isn't going to be in underground cables, so much as it will be over your head. It starts with satellites, but it gets a lot weirder.

  • Satya Nadella at one year: Grading Microsoft's CEO

    Make no mistake: A year after he succeeded Steve Ballmer in the job, CEO Satya Nadella firmly controls Microsoft's fate.

  • An inside look into VMware's new hybrid Cloud strategy

    During the past week VMware has been making power play moves in the Cloud computing market to position its offering as the premier enterprise hybrid Cloud computing platform. As it does so, however, analysts question how well the grand plan VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger has put together stacks up with heavyweights of the cloud computing market, most specifically Microsoft and Amazon Web Services (AWS).

  • Breaches are a personal nightmare for corporate security pros

    Beyond the compromise of valuable information, loss of revenues and damage to brand reputation, data breaches can pose a threat to the careers of security professionals involved: witness the sudden departures of both the CEO and the CIO of Target after last year's compromise of 40 million customers' credit cards.

  • Signs that IBM may be preparing for a round of job cuts

    IBM tries to keep its layoffs out of the public eye as much as possible, although it fails miserably at this. The company took the unusual step of denying that it was on the cusp of a gigantic layoff amid reports of a possible new round of job cuts that may begin this week.