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  • The worst thing about tech bubbles isn't what you may think

    You may recall how the last tech bubble 15 years ago resulted in staggering market losses, numerous failed start-ups and increasing IT unemployment. Less noticed was the bubble's eerie correlation to undergraduate enrollments in computer science.

  • Final Windows 10 upgrade forecast sees OS on 440M PCs by early '17

    By February 2017, Microsoft should have Windows 10 on more than 440 million personal computers, according to a new analysis of user share data and upgrade tempo.

  • How to ditch the iOS 9 preview and go back to iOS 8

    This is a time of temptation for Apple enthusiasts, many of whom are eager to get their hands -- and devices -- on the company's newest software. Between June, when company execs tout the upcoming versions of Apple's desktop and mobile operating systems, and the fall, when the polished, finished versions arrive, Apple users get a chance to serve as beta testers.

  • The end is near for OS X Mountain Lion support

    The security clock is ticking down for Apple's OS X Mountain Lion, which will probably be retired from support this fall before the Cupertino, Calif. company releases El Capitan.

  • Technology, the law, and you: BYOD

    (First in an occasional series about technology and the law.)

  • The BYOD debate is not over

    While a recent U.S.-based poll of 375 IT professionals showed the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) fad is fading, there's new evidence showing that BYOD still has plenty of life.

  • WPC 2015: Microsoft exec - Forget the past

    In a revival tent-like speech, Microsoft's chief operations officer, Kevin Turner, urged the company's partners to forget the past - an allusion to the failure of its smartphone business to gain meaningful share - but defended the decision to keep making handsets.

  • The top 10 supercomputers in the world, 20 years ago

    In 1995, the top-grossing film in the U.S. was Batman Forever. (Val Kilmer as Batman, Jim Carrey as the Riddler, Tommy Lee Jones as Two-Face. Yeah.) The L.A. Rams were moving back to St. Louis, and Michael Jordan was moving back to the Bulls. Violence was rife in the Balkans. The O.J. trial happened.

  • iPhone 7 review rollup: Apple's going to build a bazillion iPhones, but how many will be bought?

    This week, you can almost hear the production lines spinning into action in China, churning out iPhone-related rumors and titillation. Here's the past few days' worth of intrigue about Apple's next-generation device.

  • Microsoft gives Windows phones one last shot

    Microsoft will continue to manufacture smartphones for its Windows 10 Mobile operating system, but the company has thrown in the towel on the devices strategy pursued by its former CEO and will probably give up entirely unless Windows 10 reverses years of missteps in mobile, analysts said.

  • SDN: The emerging reality

    Change is still afoot in Software Defined Networking, but it is now at least clear that SDN is here to stay, that SDN will be the way we build networks going forward. In this Network World Spotlight special report, pulled together by the editors of Network World, we analyze key developments and gauge where organizations stand today in their SDN planning.

  • What's the future for Windows Phone?

    Despite rumors that Microsoft is about to kill Windows Phone, some industry observers say that's unlikely for several reasons, especially the expected gains from the rollout of Windows 10, which will run on smartphones and other devices.

  • Inside the bold plan to bring gigabit fiber to Detroit

    When discussing the ongoing revitalization efforts in Detroit, it's hard to miss the name Dan Gilbert. The founder of Quicken Loans, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, and a Detroit native himself, Gilbert's investment firms have funded dozens of tech startups in the city and turned its defunct old buildings into shiny new workspaces that look like Silicon Valley transplants.

  • Read CW's new July digital magazine!

    Download the Computerworld Digital Magazine!

  • 5 reasons you're going to want Apple's next iPhone

    Apple is cooking up such an iPhone upgrade path, with a wave of rumors warning the next iteration will be faster, thinner, and possibly even curvier than before.

  • Clear as mud: Microsoft struggles to define 'free' for Windows 10

    Microsoft's Keystone Kops-like revelation that Windows 10 testers would get a free copy of the OS -- yes, no, then yes, probably, but with strings -- may be confusing compared to Apple's approach to OS X, but reflects the much more complicated ecosystem the Redmond, Wash. company maintains.

  • The No. 1 large place to work in IT: Quicken Loans

    Ask Bobby Martin what he likes best about working for Quicken Loans when he's front and center at a Detroit Red Wings hockey game, and he'd be hard-pressed not to name the scores of free tickets available to any employee.

  • The No. 1 midsize place to work in IT: Credit Acceptance

    Six months after arriving at Credit Acceptance Corp. as a contract tech support analyst, Chris Thomas hired on as a full-time employee. He hasn't looked back.

  • The No. 1 small place to work in IT: Noah Consulting

    Noah Consulting is a completely virtual company -- its 89 employees live and work in various cities and states nationwide. But those 89 people say they feel completely connected with and supported by their colleagues and supervisors, and that's a big part of the reason why, for the second year in a row, the consultancy was named the No. 1 small employer on Computerworld's list of the 100 Best Places to Work in IT.

  • How we chose the Best Places to Work in IT 2015

    For the 22nd year in a row, Computerworld conducted a survey to identify the 100 best places to work for IT professionals. As we first did in 2014, this year we once again present the top organization data sorted by size.