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  • Cray aims to stay in big leagues with XC40 supercomputers

    Cray has added more horsepower to its latest supercomputer, the XC40, and already has scored some big-time customers.

  • Mobile developers get offline sync in new Amazon SDK

    With features such as offline sync in the new version of its Mobile SDK, Amazon Web Services is hoping to lure developers away from the cloud services offered by Google and Apple.

  • Oracle unveils Alta, a next-generation user interface

    Oracle has overhauled the way it will build user interfaces in a bid to meet customers' expectations for user-friendly mobile applications -- and also to keep pace with rivals Salesforce.com and Workday.

  • iOS 8 bug deletes iWork docs

    Owners of iPhones and iPads running iOS 8 have reported a new bug in the software that deletes iWork documents from iCloud Drive when they've reset their devices.

  • Connected ad panels to improve mobile speeds and coverage

    To make it easier for higher mobile broadband speeds using small cells, Alcatel-Lucent has joined forces with outdoor advertising company JCDecaux on the development of connected ad panels.

  • Likes of Apple Pay may make smaller banks more vulnerable

    Many banks with less than $50 billion in assets have a problem that payment systems like Apple Pay will make even more attractive to exploit, a team of security researchers says.

  • 4 reasons to stick with Java -- and 4 reasons to dump it

    Java remains a critical technology that attracts intense interest and passion, as testified by the droves of developers gathered in San Francisco this week for JavaOne, the industry's major event dedicated to the language.

  • Unlike IBM, Lenovo to manufacture some System x servers in U.S.

    Lenovo officially acquires IBM's x86 server business Wednesday, promising a seamless transition for its customers, while taking some new security-focused steps.

  • Welcome to the age of pervasive supercomputing

    Human beings tend to take incremental change in stride. For example, the loaf of bread that was 50 cents a few decades ago that now costs $3 isn't a big deal to us because the price rose gradually and steadily year by year. What we aren't adapted for is exponential change. Which explains why we tend to be taken by surprise by developments that involve digital technologies, where order-of-magnitude improvements, driven by Moore's Law, occur continuously.

  • European Commission details grounds for Apple tax probe

    The European Commission believes Apple could have received significant tax reductions from Irish authorities, and is focusing its investigation on tax rulings that favored two Apple subsidiaries, according to a newly revealed Commission document.

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