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    Senate backs Ludlam on data retention costs

    The Senate has passed a motion put by Greens Senator Scott Ludlam that calls on Attorney-General George Brandis to table a PricewaterhouseCoopers study into the cost to industry of implementing a data retention scheme.

  • Dimension Data to ramp up cloud services for federal government

    Global system integrator, Dimension Data, is expanding its presence in Canberra with the launch of managed cloud services exclusively for Federal government agencies.

  • Telstra targets government with secure cloud offer

    Telstra has touted data sovereignty as a major benefit of an announced cloud environment custom-built for government.

  • Australia, Canada, UK and China weigh in on Insecam privacy issue

    The privacy commissioners of Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and Macao, China have all sent an email to Insecam – the operator of a website that broadcasts footage from private webcams – asking it to take down its website.

  • Symantec identifies sophisticated, stealthy 'Regin' malware

    Symantec researchers have identified a particularly sophisticated piece of malware, called "Regin" that was likely developed by a nation state and has been used to spy on governments, infrastructure operators, businesses, researchers and individuals since at least 2008.

  • Reports: EU taking first step towards breaking up Google

    Members of the European Parliament are readying a motion calling for the break-up of Google, by separating its search engine functionality from other commercial services, according to news reports.

  • FCC chairman gives no timeline for net neutrality decision

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has no public timeline for voting on proposed net neutrality rules, despite pressure from President Barack Obama and some net neutrality advocates.

  • EU net neutrality legislation under threat from Italian proposals, says rights group

    European Union legislation on net neutrality is under threat, as Italy is seeking to water down a draft already adopted by the European Parliament, a digital rights group has warned.

  • NSA chief says cyberattacks on industrial systems are his top concern

    Multiple nation-states are investing in their capabilities to hack critical U.S. infrastructure, making defense of those networks a top priority, U.S. National Security Agency chief Admiral Mike Rogers said Thursday.

  • More mobile broadband spectrum possible for emergency services

    The government will ask the Productivity Commission to undertake a cost-benefit analysis of the best way to provide mobile broadband to public safety agencies by 2020.

  • Rise of Whatsapp could require regulatory reform: ACMA

    Regulators should review telecom regulation as more consumers replace traditional telephony with over-the-top (OTT) services, according to the Australian Communications and Media Authority.

  • AT&T to pay $23.8 million to settle California dumping complaint

    AT&T has agreed to pay US$23.8 million to resolve allegations by the state of California that it illegally disposed of hazardous waste, including electronics, batteries and aerosol cans, by throwing it into dumpsters.

  • Data exchange talks lag, jeopardizing US firms' ability to operate in Europe

    Thanks to revelations about government spying, a revamped version of a 15-year-old agreement governing the exchange of personal data between EU and the U.S. still seems a long way off, threatening the ability of American companies to do business in Europe.

  • NSA director: No changes in telephone record collection coming

    The U.S. National Security Agency is planning no major changes in its domestic telephone records collection program after a bill to rein in those efforts failed in the Senate this week, the agency's director said.

  • Google Play taps Chinese developers for paid apps, despite block

    Even though China has blocked access to Google Play in the country, the app platform is still hoping to bring aboard more Chinese-made apps, and help them make money from international customers.

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    Risks of e-voting outweigh benefits – for now

    An interim report of a parliamentary committee tasked with examining the 2013 Senate ballot in Western Australia has concluded that the nation is not yet ready for the widespread use of e-voting in federal elections.

  • NSW government attracts SMEs for procurement

    More than 1000 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have registered for the ICT Services Scheme in New South Wales, the NSW government has revealed.

  • US Senator Al Franken questions Uber's privacy policies

    U.S. Senator Al Franken has waded into the latest controversy surrounding Uber, asking the car service app company pointed questions about its privacy policies.

  • Court shuts down tech support 'scams' targeted by FTC

    A Florida court has temporarily shut down two "massive" telemarketing operations that allegedly conned tens of thousands of consumers out of millions of dollars by tricking them into fixing nonexistent computer errors, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said.

  • Blocked messaging app Line looks for comeback in China

    Months after its messaging app was blocked in China, the company behind Line is "optimistic" it can bring the service back to the country in the near future, in spite of the government's growing censorship of the Internet.