Government » News »

  • NBN Co chief expects Telstra, Optus talks to end in 2014

    National Broadband Network negotiations with Telstra are on the “home stretch” and could be submitted for government approval by the end of the year, NBN Co CEO Bill Morrow has said.

  • 1

    Privacy complaints jump by 183% in FY14

    The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) received 4,239 privacy complaints during FY14, a 183 per cent increase on the 1,496 received in the previous financial year, according to a report.

  • IBM's chip business sale gets national security scrutiny

    IBM's plan to transfer its semiconductor manufacturing business to GlobalFoundries faces a government review over national security implications. It has the potential of being complicated because of IBM's role as a defense supplier.

  • Accused text-message spammers to pay $9 million in settlement

    A group of companies that allegedly promised mobile phone users supposedly free gift cards and electronic devices in a "massive" text-messaging spam operation will pay more than US$9 million to settle complaints from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

  • Lawmakers call on FCC to reclassify broadband for net neutrality

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should reclassify broadband as a regulated public utility in order to achieve net neutrality, but take a "light touch" while doing it, a U.S. lawmaker said Wednesday.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook meets with Chinese official after iCloud attack

    Just after Apple's iCloud service faced a hacking attack from China, Apple CEO Tim Cook met with a Chinese official on Wednesday to discuss protecting users' privacy.

  • New European Commission, approved by Parliament, will focus on the digital domain

    The digital domain will be an important focus for the new members of the European Union's executive branch, the European Commission, following their approval by the European Parliament on Wednesday.

  • Victorian police spend $15m on IT refresh

    The Victorian police spent a total of $15 million on an IT refresh during the 2013-14 financial year, including the replacing of a distributed server network, transitioning from Windows XP to Windows 7 and designing new data centre

  • NSW govt dives deeper into data, digital

    The New South Wales government has revealed plans to digitise public records and make it easier for agencies to share data.

  • NASA orbiter and rover send back first looks at comet Siding Spring

    After comet Siding Spring made a close flyby past Mars on Sunday, one of NASA's orbiters and a robotic rover captured images of it -- and they've already beamed them back to Earth.

  • Google, Facebook continue massive lobbying efforts in Q3

    Google and Facebook continued to pour millions of dollars into federal political lobbying in the third quarter in attempts to influence U.S. lawmakers and have legislation written in their favor.

  • Digital rights groups ask ITU to stay out of net neutrality debate

    The International Telecommunication Union should resist calls to adopt rules allowing countries to charge fees for Internet traffic coming from outside their borders, said 21 digital rights groups from 11 countries.

  • FTC appoints privacy researcher Soltani as chief technologist

    The U.S. Federal Trade Commission's new chief technologist is high-profile digital privacy consultant Ashkan Soltani, a move that signals the agency's growing interest in policing online tracking and other Internet privacy issues.

  • Candidates for EU's data protection job heard by the European Parliament

    The European Union is finally moving to replace its data protection supervisor, after Members of the European Parliament interviewed the five candidates shortlisted for the roles of EU data protection supervisor and assistant supervisor on Monday.

  • Samsung Knox devices approved for government use by NSA

    Samsung Electronics' Galaxy devices have been approved by the U.S. National Security Agency under a program of the agency to quickly deploy commercially available technologies.

  • Identity crime costing Australia $1.6b every year, govt says

    The economic impact of identity crime on Australia is costing the country up to $1.6 billion each year, according to a new report by the Attorney-General’s Department.

  • Are higher frequencies mobile's next frontier? The FCC wants to know

    Some mobile researchers think future networks will reach into higher frequencies to keep up with traffic, and the FCC now wants to know how it might help to make that possible.

  • ITU gives public more access to talks on future of the Internet

    Members of the public will be able to eavesdrop on intergovernmental negotiations about the future of the Internet that began Monday in Busan, South Korea, after participants voted to webcast the meetings.

  • Free online library will help Australian councils share information

    From November 3, Australian councils will be able to access a free online library that allows them to share processes such as building consents, wastewater management, environmental health and liquor licensing.

  • Tech industry likes Obama nominee for patent office

    The U.S. tech industry scored a victory this week when President Barack Obama nominated former Google lawyer Michelle Lee to lead the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.