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  • Shared services org eyes cloud for production — eventually

    The Shared Services Centre, established to provide IT and corporate services to the federal departments of education and employment, is interested in eventually expanding its use of cloud services to cover production systems, according to Susan Monkley, its CIO and deputy CEO.

  • Turnbull warns ACCC against undermining Telstra NBN agreement

    Communications minister Malcolm Turnbull and finance minister Mathias Cormann have warned the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission that cutting wholesale pricing for services over Telstra's copper network could negatively affect the National Broadband Network rollout.

  • Qualcomm faces hurdles collecting royalties from China

    China's anti-monopoly investigation of Qualcomm is starting to disrupt its licensing business and making it harder for the U.S. company to collect royalties from the country.

  • In brief: Govt adds more suppliers to data centre panel

    The federal government has added three more suppliers to its Data Centre Facilities Supplies Panel.

  • UK government adopts ODF for document exchange with citizens and suppliers

    The U.K. government has adopted ODF as its standard for the exchange of word processor and spreadsheet files between departments and with citizens and suppliers, meaning that companies and citizens will not be required to buy a particular application or software suite in order to collaborate with government staff.

  • Dutch spy agencies can receive NSA data, court rules

    Dutch intelligence services can receive bulk data that might have been obtained by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) through mass data interception programs, even though collecting data that way is illegal for the Dutch services, the Hague District Court ruled Wednesday.

  • Google rival slams EU Commission over antitrust settlement proposals

    One of the complainants in an antitrust case against Google has slammed the European Commission for apparently adopting wholesale Google's proposal to settle the case, while giving complainants no fair chance to express their views on the settlement. Meanwhile, the Commission is considering revising the terms of the settlement, according to media reports.

  • More mobile gadgets than people? Seven countries - including Australia - now qualify

    Wireless broadband subscriptions now outnumber people in seven countries as consumers continue to snap up smartphones and tablets, according to a new report.

  • NASA upgrades humanoid robot in space

    The 300-pound humanoid robot working on the International Space Station is in the midst of getting a series of upgrades, including new processors and software in preparation of having a pair of legs attached to it.

  • Members of UK Parliament call for judicial review of data retention law

    Two members of the British Parliament are seeking judicial review of a surveillance law that extends U.K. data retention rules and was rushed through by the government.

  • NSW revamps open data repository

    The New South Wales government has launched a revamped open data repository.

  • Google may bring Wi-Fi to New York City pay phones

    Google may be among the hopefuls vying to turn the New York City phone booths of the past into "communication points" of the future with free Wi-Fi and cellphone charging.

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    Data retention: iiNet raises spectre of ‘surveillance tax’ for ISP customers

    Internet service provider iiNet has hit out at confirmation that the government is actively considering a mandatory data retention scheme under which ISPs and telcos may be forced to keep records on their customers’ online activities.

  • US needs to restore trust following NSA revelations, tech groups say

    The U.S government can take action to slow the calls in other countries to abandon U.S. tech vendors following revelations about widespread National Security Agency surveillance, some tech representatives said Friday.

  • U.S. senator blasts Microsoft's H-1B push as it lays 18,000 off workers

    U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions Thursday delivered a scalding and sarcastic attack on the use of highly skilled foreign workers by U.S. corporations that was heavily aimed at Microsoft, a chief supporter of the practice.

  • Net neutrality a key battleground in growing fight over encryption, activists say

    Plans to favor some Internet packets over others threaten consumers' hard-won right to use encryption, a digital privacy advocate says.

  • EC slams Apple for in-app purchase policies

    The European Commission took Apple to task Friday for failing to firmly commit to stopping inadvertent in-app purchases, particularly those made by children.

  • UK rushes through surveillance bill, extending data retention rules

    The U.K. government has pushed through a new surveillance law to replace one a European Union court said interfered with fundamental privacy rights -- but, say civil rights campaigners, the new law is worse than the one it replaces.

  • Fujitsu shuttles NSW government email to the cloud

    Fujitsu will provide a cloud email service for 27,000 mailboxes across the New South Wales government.

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    Australian investigations of online sexual abuse material rise 550 per cent

    The 2013/14 financial year saw more than six times the number of Australian investigations into online child sexual abuse material, according to figures released today by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).