Government » News »

  • Consumer group decries government's anti-piracy plans

    Consumer advocacy group Choice has criticised anti-piracy proposals contained in a leaked government discussion paper as likely to be ineffective and failing to deal with the root causes of unauthorised downloading of content.

  • 1

    Data retention: Industry reiterates warning on costs

    "You're going to the shops to get a litre of milk anyway, so it's no big deal to bring me the whole supermarket" — that's how iiNet's chief regulatory officer, Steve Dalby, today described government suggestions a mandatory data retention scheme would not impose significant burdens on telecommunications carriers.

  • ACMA signs online child abuse notification scheme with police

    The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has signed formal agreements with state, territory and federal police for the reporting of online child abuse material in Australia.

  • Solar power war between U.S. and Asia escalates

    New tariffs imposed by the U.S. on Chinese imports of solar cells and (for the first time) Taiwan has infuriated some in the solar power industry who believe the steep taxes will adversely affect businesses and consumers.

  • Queensland ambos seek iPad-based forms

    Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) has issued an invitation to offer (IOT) for the delivery of an electronic ambulance form that allows paramedics to record patient care information on iPads at the scene of the accident.

  • Russian government offers money for identifying Tor users

    The Russian Ministry of Interior is willing to pay 3.9 million roubles, or around US$111,000, for a method to identify users on the Tor network.

  • LTE network for US public safety taking it one step at a time

    The organizers of the FirstNet LTE public safety network have the frequencies and standards they need to build the system, and they know where the money's coming from. They know how to get there from here, but it won't be a quick trip.

  • 3

    Government pushes website blocks to fight piracy

    A leaked government discussion paper reveals a "very radical proposal for copyright law reform in Australia" according to intellectual property expert Dr Matthew Rimmer.

  • California sees IT shifting to IBM-built cloud

    California is moving its IT services to a cloud, on-demand, subscription-based service that state officials believe may meet as much as 80% of its computing needs.

  • Europeans call for a single EU copyright to get more access to online services

    Many European consumers are frustrated by frequently being denied access to online services outside of their home countries and are calling on the European Commission to implement a 'common copyright' in Europe. This pits them against publishers and broadcasters, who want enforcement of existing rules instead, a public consultation on EU digital copyright reform showed.

  • Shared services org eyes cloud for production — eventually

    The Shared Services Centre, established to provide IT and corporate services to the federal departments of education and employment, is interested in eventually expanding its use of cloud services to cover production systems, according to Susan Monkley, its CIO and deputy CEO.

  • 4

    Turnbull warns ACCC against undermining Telstra NBN agreement

    Communications minister Malcolm Turnbull and finance minister Mathias Cormann have warned the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission that cutting wholesale pricing for services over Telstra's copper network could negatively affect the National Broadband Network rollout.

  • Qualcomm faces hurdles collecting royalties from China

    China's anti-monopoly investigation of Qualcomm is starting to disrupt its licensing business and making it harder for the U.S. company to collect royalties from the country.

  • In brief: Govt adds more suppliers to data centre panel

    The federal government has added three more suppliers to its Data Centre Facilities Supplies Panel.

  • UK government adopts ODF for document exchange with citizens and suppliers

    The U.K. government has adopted ODF as its standard for the exchange of word processor and spreadsheet files between departments and with citizens and suppliers, meaning that companies and citizens will not be required to buy a particular application or software suite in order to collaborate with government staff.

  • Dutch spy agencies can receive NSA data, court rules

    Dutch intelligence services can receive bulk data that might have been obtained by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) through mass data interception programs, even though collecting data that way is illegal for the Dutch services, the Hague District Court ruled Wednesday.

  • Google rival slams EU Commission over antitrust settlement proposals

    One of the complainants in an antitrust case against Google has slammed the European Commission for apparently adopting wholesale Google's proposal to settle the case, while giving complainants no fair chance to express their views on the settlement. Meanwhile, the Commission is considering revising the terms of the settlement, according to media reports.

  • More mobile gadgets than people? Seven countries - including Australia - now qualify

    Wireless broadband subscriptions now outnumber people in seven countries as consumers continue to snap up smartphones and tablets, according to a new report.

  • NASA upgrades humanoid robot in space

    The 300-pound humanoid robot working on the International Space Station is in the midst of getting a series of upgrades, including new processors and software in preparation of having a pair of legs attached to it.

  • Members of UK Parliament call for judicial review of data retention law

    Two members of the British Parliament are seeking judicial review of a surveillance law that extends U.K. data retention rules and was rushed through by the government.