Government » Features »

  • Who wins the net neutrality debate? Google, of course

    In the debate over net neutrality, AT&T and Cisco are warning that fiber optic cable rollouts could be delayed -- and revenues lost -- if President Obama's recently proposed rules move ahead.

  • 3D printing makes its move into production

    The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition.

  • Obama has big options for green card, H-1B reform without Congress

    With Congress refusing to move on immigration reform, President Barack Obama has options that could have broad impacts on immigration generally, and on the H-1B and green card visa systems in particular.

  • Is EU's 'right to be forgotten' really the 'right to edit the truth'?

    With Europe's top court ordering Google to allow people to basically edit their online personal histories, some wonder what this will mean for finding the truth online.

  • U.S. commercial drone industry struggles to take off

    The U.S. commercial drone industry is still struggling to get off the ground more than two years after President Obama signed into law a bill that permits the civilian use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) over the country's airspace.

  • Broadband faces a fork in the road

    As Google and AT&T race to provide super-fast 1 gigabit fiber networks to power users, more than a quarter of U.S. homes still have no broadband service at all.

  • Microsoft scrambles to simplify its licensing

    Microsoft is pledging dramatic improvements to its notoriously complex enterprise licensing, but experts are skeptical about the potential impact of the plan.

  • US court strikes down net neutrality: What's next?

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and its allies have several options, with most of them difficult, after a U.S. appeals court struck down most of the agency's 2010 net neutrality rules.

  • Thanks to the NSA, quantum computing may some day be in the cloud

    The NSA is spending some $80 million in basic research on quantum computing, money that may ultimately help commercialize quantum computing for the private sector.

  • Debate over NSA surveillance shifts with judge's ruling, task force report

    After six months of contentious debate over U.S. National Security Agency surveillance programs, prompted by leaks from former government contractor Edward Snowden, the third week in December may have marked a major turning point.

  • Voice calls from planes: A social debate, not a technology dilemma

    Making voice calls via cell phone aboard a plane doesn't hold much interest for U.S. airline passengers or airlines, but there isn't a technological reason to ban them, according to federal authorities.

  • Cell phones on planes may be heading for the US, but will anyone use them?

    In-flight cellular in the U.S. may be closer to reality than some consumers realize, with foreign airlines poised to extend services they already offer elsewhere. But evidence from overseas suggests the odds of being trapped next to a chronic caller are slim.

  • Top tech stories of 2013: Big Brother, wearables, and the struggles of aging tech giants

    Politics collided with the world of technology this year as stories about U.S. government spying stirred angst both among the country's citizens and foreign governments, and the flawed HeathCare.gov site got American health-care reform off to a rocky start. Meanwhile, the post-PC era put aging tech giants under pressure to reinvent themselves. Here in no particular order are IDG News Service's picks for the top 10 tech stories of the year.

  • Perspective: Privacy concerns could keep Amazon delivery drones grounded

    Amazon's nascent plan to use unmanned drones to deliver packages to customers has already raised strong privacy concerns that could ultimately nip it in the bud.

  • The latest move to kill bad patents divides tech industry

    Technology users -- retailers, in particular -- are being snared in patent infringement lawsuits, prompting Congress to eye reforms that could change how lawsuits are filed and who pays if they're frivolous.

  • FCC's in-flight cellphone plan carries a lot of baggage

    Anyone who dreads hearing one end of a loud phone call all the way from Anchorage to Miami, take heart: The plan to allow cellphones on planes could fail in more ways than an overbooked flight at a snowbound airport on Christmas Eve.

  • Perspective: Curbing data use is key to reining in NSA

    Any effort to rein in the National Security Agency after its widespread spy activities were revealed in leaked documents must focus on more than simply limiting what personal data can be collected.

  • HealthCare.gov's problems: What we know so far

    More than a month after it went live, a couple of large questions remain about the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' botched launch of HealthCare.gov.

  • What's Wrong With Healthcare.gov's Price Estimator

    In the early days of Healthcare.gov, I praised the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for publishing a dataset with sample rates for every health plan participating in the federal health insurance marketplace.

  • New Dell won't abandon the PC

    Dell officials vow that the company will continue making acquisitions and will remain committed to its struggling PC business once its $24.9 billion deal to go private is complete.

CIO
ARN
Techworld
CMO