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  • Microsoft now leads in tech layoffs

    Microsoft's planned 18,000 job cuts, or 14% of its workforce, is the biggest tech layoff announced this year, surpassing Hewlett-Packard's announcement in May that it was cutting 16,000 jobs.

  • Layoffs raise questions about Nadella's commitment to Nokia deal

    Microsoft's 14 percent staff reduction, the largest in its history and focused heavily on employees acquired from Nokia's devices and services business, has some observers thinking Satya Nadella got a bad case of Lumia-induced indigestion.

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    How Microsoft announces layoffs will show the company's PR IQ

    If Microsoft pulls the layoff trigger today, as many expect, the company will face PR problems if it doesn't make smart moves, a crisis communications expert said.

  • Highs and lows of CEO pay

    This year's proxy season has come to a close, and after digging through regulatory filings, 10 highlights stand out in our analysis of 62 tech CEOs' compensation.

  • Microsoft may announce its biggest layoffs ever on Thursday

    Microsoft reportedly will announce the biggest round of layoffs in its history on Thursday as massive changes wrought by new CEO Satya Nadella start to take hold at the struggling IT giant.

  • Employers use customized bonus plans to attract developers, survey says

    Software developers may find more employers using customized bonuses to attract and retain them as the job market for their skills stays competitive, according to a salary survey from IT job site Dice.

  • Adobe finds new Australia and New Zealand MD

    Adobe Australia and New Zealand head of digital media Chris Skelton has been promoted to A/NZ managing director.

  • The top 10 paying IT jobs: IT careers can prove fruitful

    IT management positions have long paid quite well, but a new survey finds that a lot of other IT jobs are providing big paychecks.

  • Women entrepreneurs offer 4 tips for startup success

    Passion and persistence makes the successful entrepreneur, according to four Australian women entrepreneurs who lead their own startups.

  • MMS: Back to the Basics?

    A long, long time ago, there was an event, usually held in Las Vegas, called the SMS User Conference. (For a full history of MMS, see Rod Trent's article at http://myitforum.com/myitforumwp/docs/the-history-of-mms/.) In 2002, the conference was rebranded as the Microsoft Management Summit (MMS), although that year it was still managed and maintained by Altiris. Over the years MMS grew with Microsoft's management and backing. Microsoft selected the speakers and topics, and the event became more professional as it continued to look more and more like a Microsoft conference rather than a user conference. After MMS 2013, Microsoft decided to "absorb" the Microsoft Management Summit into TechEd, an even larger event and held in Houston in 2014.

  • Flinders University to establish ICT academy with Cisco

    Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia will establish a new academy with Cisco at the university’s Tonsley Park campus to help students with their ICT degrees.

  • An H-1B whistleblower tries again for justice

    H-1B whistleblower Jay Palmer has filed a new complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor, alleging that senior executives at Infosys "retaliated against him by denying him work, bonuses and promotions and terminating him."

  • Startups don't get daunted by failure: Guy Kawasaki

    It takes some irrationality to be an entrepreneur, according to Guy Kawasaki, an Apple veteran who is now chief evangelist of graphic design startup Canva.

  • Advice for college students seeking a tech career: Turn to internships

    When Katie Smith interned with Capital One, she expected to spend the summer fetching beverages for her manager -- instead, she started on a career path that led to a full-time IT job at the banking and financial services company.

  • If immigration reform is dead, so is raising the H-1B cap

    In a speech Wednesday on the floor of the U.S. House, Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) declared immigration reform dead.

  • CIO Executive Council launches Pathways Express

    The CIO Executive Council has launched Pathways Express, a one-day intensive learning and development program for organisations that want to improve the business acumen of their senior ICT executives.

  • SAGE-AU goes into bat for sysadmins

    Not-for-profit organisation SAGE-AU said it wants to shine a spotlight on the sometimes unsung heroes of IT, system administrators.

  • Security skills shortage is real, and it's not going away anytime soon

    The current shortage of cybersecurity professionals in the U.S will likely resolve itself over the next several years, according to the RAND Corp. But until then, companies will find it disturbingly difficult to find skilled workers.

  • IT hiring rises where it counts

    Hiring at companies that are mostly users of technology is on the rise, according to Computer Economics.

  • How the cloud can make IT shops more innovative

    Jobs at many IT departments have been primarily about maintenance -- handling crashed email systems, ever-expanding security perimeters and users who bringing their own devices to the office