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  • Evan Schuman: The data dangers of free public Wi-Fi

    New York's plan to turn pay phones into free Wi-Fi stations could be a template for other cities, and bad news for IT departments trying to protect corporate data and intellectual property.

  • What to know after the latest patent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court

    The Alice ruling clarifies patent-eligible software processes.

  • If you can't check in, is it really Foursquare?

    In their quest to copy competitors, social sites and apps increasingly drop features that are part of the popularity and identity of their products, says columnist Mike Elgan.

  • How to effectively manage the integration of IT/OT in the hyper-connected enterprise

    There has been a lot of discussion lately about the Internet of Things (IoT) and how connected endpoints can help revolutionize the way businesses collect and process information from Operational Technology (OT) systems, but there are huge challenges in accessing the information and making it accessible to your other business systems, employees and business partners.

  • The hidden dangers of "good enough" authentication

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • 13 pieces of advice for Yosemite beta testers

    For the first time since 2000, Apple is allowing pubic beta testers to try out a prerelease version of OS X. Ryan Faas tells testers what to do and what to avoid.

  • Doing an Office 365 Migration the Right Way

    Migrating email from Exchange (on-premises) to Office 365 (in the cloud) would seem to be a pretty simple and straight forward process, and when you know what you are doing, it is a methodical process. However in the past 2-3 years that we've been doing Office 365 migrations, it's amazing the number of times we get called in to "fix something" that some other migration specialist did that has us shaking our heads wondering what they were thinking...

  • The Apple/IBM deal: iOS claims the IoT

    The partnership announced last week isn't just about selling more iPhones. It's part of a big push into the Internet of Things.

  • Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud

    More and more organizations are moving SharePoint and SQL workloads into Microsoft Azure in the cloud because of the simplicity of spinning up servers in the cloud, adding more capacity, decreasing capacity without having to BUY servers on-premise. What used to cost organizations $20,000, $50,000, or more in purchasing servers, storage, network bandwidth, replica disaster recovery sites, etc and delay SharePoint and SQL rollouts by weeks or month is now completely managed by spinning up virtual machines up in Azure and customizing and configuring systems in the Cloud.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Bye, Nokia, nice knowing you

    Nokia, once a great company and the pride of Finland, is shuffling to its grave under Microsoft's leadership.

  • Julia King: We're all data scientists now

    It's up to each one of us to figure out what in the daily surge of data is useful, what's crap and what's truly valuable.

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    Preston Gralla: Jeff Bezos hates you

    But he's quite fond of your credit card.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

  • Apple and IBM: A winning combo for IT

    One thing is clear about the Apple-IBM partnership: It will change the dynamic of the enterprise mobility market in significant ways.

  • Timeline: How Apple's iOS gained enterprise cred

    In the seven years since the first iPhone arrived, iOS has morphed from a consumer-centric OS into one with a wealth of enterprise-worthy features.

  • Kenneth van Wyk: We can't just blame users

    Yes, users sometimes do stupid things. Some always will. But developers need to do more to save users from themselves.

  • Why we need an underground Google

    There has never been a search engine that accurately reflects the Internet.

  • Facebook is a school yard bully that's going down

    Facebook has grown and evolved in recent years. In addition to connecting people online, it bombards users with unnecessary ads and useless sponsored stories. And it runs experiments on its users. Columnist Alex Burinskiy is not amused.

  • Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

    Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

  • Microsoft Azure ML -- Big Data Modeling in Azure

    Microsoft has jumped in with both feet with the release to Preview of a new Microsoft Azure-based tool that helps organizations do Machine Learning and predictive analysis all from a Web console.