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  • Rating the payment options

    Several electronic and mobile payment options have become available, but most of us in the U.S. are still using plain-vanilla credit and debit cards with magnetic stripes. They use technology that dates to the first Nixon administration. That's not a problem in itself; I have no problem with time-tested security measures that work effectively. But just look around: Data breaches are everywhere, and those magnetic-stripe cards are often implicated.

  • The FCC's Orwellian Internet policy

    President Obama's secret plan to protect the "open Internet" is locked inside the Federal Communications Commission. We don't know what's in the 322 pages, but we are told it includes a transparency rule.

  • Tech toys train tots for a troubling tomorrow

    Toys always reflect the larger culture -- its biases, fears and, most of all, its technology. New York's Toy Fair 2015 happened this week, and the latest round of new tech toys is bringing some of the most disturbing tech trends to children.

  • No one is too small to hack

    As the White House and Congress consider new cybersecurity legislation, some middle-market companies may still be questioning whether the cybersecurity crisis is a real threat for their businesses.

  • Why Apple is the most successful company in history

    Everyone knows that Apple had a great fourth quarter and that its most successful product line, the iPhone, is doing better than ever, too.

  • Patent trolls: Congress gets down to business

    White Castle might not be the first company that comes to mind when high tech is mentioned, but the restaurant chain found itself in the middle of the patent troll controversy when it started sending menu updates from its headquarters to digital screens in restaurants around the country.

  • The ‘sophisticated attack' myth

    Sometimes I wonder whether any company will ever fall victim to an unsophisticated cyberattack. Because after every attack that comes to light, we hear that same excuse: It was a sophisticated attack.

  • A lot of private-sector data is also used for public good

    As the private sector continues to invest in data-driven innovation, the capacity for society to benefit from this data collection grows as well. Much has been said about how the private sector is using the data it collects to improve corporate bottom lines, but positive stories about how that data contributes to the greater public good are largely unknown.

  • It's time for the chip-and-PIN'ing of America

    Thank goodness for that signature on the back of my credit card. If it weren't for that smudged scrawl, a thief might steal my card (or card number) and make fraudulent purchases. Or steal my identity. Right.

  • Can you trust Amazon's WorkMail?

    When Amazon unveiled its cloud-based corporate WorkMail email offering last week (Jan. 28), it stressed the high-level of encryption it would use and the fact that corporate users would control their own decryption keys. But Amazon neglected to mention that it will retain full access to those messages -- along with the ability to both analyze data for e-commerce marketing and to give data to law enforcement should subpoenas show up.

  • 'Parks And Recreation,' Facebook and The New Privacy

    If you tuned into Parks And Recreation Tuesday night, you were treated to an episode where social media startup Gryzzl attempts to win over the hearts and minds of its  new neighbors in the fictional town of Pawnee with boxes full of gifts, delivered via Amazon-esque drones.

  • HoloLens: Look who's innovating

    Poor, slow-footed old Microsoft. It just can't adapt to changing times or keep up with more innovative, agile and forward-looking companies like Apple and Google. That's been the way many of us have thought of Microsoft for a long time. But it may be our thinking that's old and outdated.

  • HoloLens: Abracadabra! Microsoft unveils a great distraction

    Oh my gosh! The world's first holographic computing platform! Is this or is this not the best thing ever?

  • Why Surface Hub is more interesting than HoloLens

    Microsoft had an unusually kick-ass event this week. They trotted out the next version of Windows, which is called Windows 10.

  • Data analytics: Are we there yet?

    Remember what travel was like before GPS? You could usually manage if you were traveling along familiar roads, but go on a long trip and it could get exciting. Which exit were we looking for? Had we passed the red barn? Did the gas station attendant say to turn after three lights or four? And let's not forget the kids in the back seat asking, "When will we get there?" Okay, that part hasn't changed, although the good news is that they can usually see the GPS screen too and answer their own questions.

  • Facebook, take note!

    In the last few weeks it's possible some of your Facebook chums posted messages on their walls in which they tried to revoke permission for the social network to use and distribute content they post.

  • Forget Windows 10. Here are the four most important words Microsoft said today: Windows as a Service

    Microsoft's wide-ranging announcements about Windows 10 covered things as mundane as new customisations for the Windows 10 Start screen and as mind-blowing as a new computing holographic platform.

  • Outsourcing contracts: Foundations for success

    Most business and IT leaders learned to negotiate with outsourcers 15 or 20 years ago, when the virtual corporation was seen as the organization to emulate. Although virtual organizations have faded, they provided valuable lessons regarding how to structure outsourcing contracts. Unfortunately, those lessons are being lost. Over the last few years, I have encountered multiple organizations making "first-time buyer" mistakes when negotiating with outsourcers.

  • Let's not make patent trolls stronger

    As you can tell by the name we've given them, patent trolls aren't popular critters. The game these operators play is shady and sleazy, bordering on extortion -- though it's completely legal. What they do is to purchase patents, with no intention of using or selling them, but rather to shake down as many people as possible by accusing them of violating the patent, even if the patent troll has no reason to believe that.

  • Why I'm still excited about Google Glass

    I love covering Google, because the company is unpredictable. They believe in crazy moon-shot projects and have the resources to pursue them. And they put stuff into the public eye way, way before it's ready for prime time.