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  • Why in-air gestures failed, and why they'll soon win

    Four years ago, in-the-air gestures were the future of gaming and the desktop PC user interface.

  • Microsoft should ante up to users for scammed Windows Store apps

    Microsoft finally did the right thing by finally ridding the Windows Store of 1,500 scams and copycat apps. But here's one thing it's not yet doing: Actively searching out users who paid for the fraudulent apps and paying them back.

  • Lightning? That's the least of their problems

    This consultant pilot fish is called in by a new client -- a banquet hall -- to troubleshoot the wireless network after a lighting storm.

  • Opinion: Git legit in the enterprise

    Originally created as a distributed code management system for open source development, Git's popularity has skyrocketed as independent developers have adopted the tool for its speed, flexibility and powerful branch and merge features.

  • Out with the old, in with the new

    Welcome to the new Computerworld. Before your eyes is a completely reimagined, redesigned and re-architected website. The editors are working with an entirely new suite of content-creation tools. It's a lot of change at once, but we were due. We're very excited about the results. Let's take a quick tour of what's new.

  • Evan Schuman: Google eyes the preteen set

    Kids say the darndest things -- and Google wants to know about and memorize each and every one of them. And not just what they say, but the sites they visit, the things they buy, the things they don't buy, the browsers they use and anything else it can suck up relating to the kids' computers, phones, networks and geolocation. Google just loves kids -- especially the part about how much retailers will pay for all of that information.

  • How to understand Twitter's bad new direction

    Twitter has made two small changes that indicate a big shift in direction for everybody's favorite microblogging service

  • Rethinking communications regulation

    Federal legislation on communications policy predates all the changes brought about by the Internet. It's time to address Internet regulation directly.

  • The trouble with trolls (and how to beat them)

    A vulnerable person. A sociopath or two on social media tormenting that person without consequence. That's trolling in a nutshell.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Patent trolls under attack, but not dead yet

    The patent wars keep going and going and we keep paying and paying.

  • Evan Schuman: Barnes & Noble plays into Amazon's hands

    Same-day delivery is a boon for the online leader, but it will only help doom B&N.

  • Google, Facebook go beyond social, beyond identity

    In order to understand the strange but spectacularly profitable world of Google and Facebook today, it's important to start in the fall of 2010.

  • Five reasons to build an enterprise app store ASAP

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • OkCupid -- it's not me, its you

    Remember the controversy over Facebook's social experimentation, which showed how people's emotions could be toyed with by changing what they see online? Well, Facebook wasn't the only site playing with your heart. Dating site OkCupid has now acknowledged doing much the same thing. The mostly free dating service is being very open about how it manipulated members' online dating lives and offers a detailed explanation that amounts to a version of "Hey, everybody's doing it."

  • Career advice: A plan for battling organizational politics

    Premier 100 IT Leader Karen Sullivan also answers questions on the value of undergraduate degrees and MBAs.

  • Satya Nadella at six months: Grading Microsoft's new CEO

    Satya Nadella took over as Microsoft's CEO six months ago, on Feb. 4, 2014. While that six months seemed to have gone a lot quicker than the gestation period prior to Nadella's coronation, it's plenty long enough for us to get a bead on the kind of supremacy it will be in Redmond.

  • Ron Miller: Spain's link tax taxes my patience

    The so-called Google tax is a desperate and wrongheaded gambit to save traditional newspapers.

  • Revamped Apple TV may be delayed until 2015, report claims

    With Apple executives touting the most exciting lineup of new products in 25 years, one product due for a major upgrade is Apple's long-adored hobby -- the Apple TV.

  • OpenFlow Supports IPv6 Flows

    OpenFlow is a Software-Defined Networking (SDN) protocol used for southbound communications from an SDN controller to and from a network device. OpenFlow is the protocol used to inform the topology of network switches on which flows should be added to their flow tables and advise switches how they should handle traffic flows that are not in the current flow tables. Initially, OpenFlow did not have any definition for handling IPv6 communications. Now, newer OpenFlow versions have IPv6 capabilities and more vendors are deploying products that use the newer OpenFlow versions. This article goes over the IPv6 functions within the OpenFlow protocol and describes how these are being used.

  • Evan Schuman: The data dangers of free public Wi-Fi

    New York's plan to turn pay phones into free Wi-Fi stations could be a template for other cities, and bad news for IT departments trying to protect corporate data and intellectual property.