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  • How will iPhone 6's Wi-Fi calling, VoLTE affect enterprise networks?

    While the cosmetic features like screen size and processing power of Apple's new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus attracted the most attention, their use of Wi-Fi and Voice over LTE (VoLTE) for voice and video calling could eventually have a major impact on how phone calls are handled in the enterprise.

  • How to ensure the success of your Continuous Delivery initiative using testing

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • SDN and Network Virtualization: A Reality Check

    The Software Defined Networking movement is still evolving, but profiles of SDN users are becoming more clear and we're getting a bead on some of the common evaluation criteria companies are using to gauge how to go forward. We also have a sense of when companies expect to start the process in earnest.

  • Home automation's next big opportunity: Controlling the water heater

    Three years ago most people barely even thought about their air conditioning, until it didn't work. Then along came NEST, the smart thermostat that opened up a whole new world of home control, and most importantly, money savings. Suddenly, the state of your indoor climate was dinner-table conversation. Get ready to start talking about your water heater.

  • The Fappening: iCloud users, beware!

    The event dubbed by the internet as "the Fappening" is the largest celebrity nude photo leak in history. Although information is still emerging as to how, why and who is at fault, don't blame Apple for this latest security disaster. Celebrity nudes are not new; I am sure that everyone remembers the controversy surrounding Paris Hilton -- and Pamela Anderson before her. What makes this different is how these photos were taken. The celebrities involved were quick to respond to the news in a variety of intriguing ways, including the following tweet from Mary E. Winstead:

  • Why in-air gestures failed, and why they'll soon win

    Four years ago, in-the-air gestures were the future of gaming and the desktop PC user interface.

  • Microsoft should ante up to users for scammed Windows Store apps

    Microsoft finally did the right thing by finally ridding the Windows Store of 1,500 scams and copycat apps. But here's one thing it's not yet doing: Actively searching out users who paid for the fraudulent apps and paying them back.

  • Lightning? That's the least of their problems

    This consultant pilot fish is called in by a new client -- a banquet hall -- to troubleshoot the wireless network after a lighting storm.

  • Opinion: Git legit in the enterprise

    Originally created as a distributed code management system for open source development, Git's popularity has skyrocketed as independent developers have adopted the tool for its speed, flexibility and powerful branch and merge features.

  • Out with the old, in with the new

    Welcome to the new Computerworld. Before your eyes is a completely reimagined, redesigned and re-architected website. The editors are working with an entirely new suite of content-creation tools. It's a lot of change at once, but we were due. We're very excited about the results. Let's take a quick tour of what's new.

  • Evan Schuman: Google eyes the preteen set

    Kids say the darndest things -- and Google wants to know about and memorize each and every one of them. And not just what they say, but the sites they visit, the things they buy, the things they don't buy, the browsers they use and anything else it can suck up relating to the kids' computers, phones, networks and geolocation. Google just loves kids -- especially the part about how much retailers will pay for all of that information.

  • How to understand Twitter's bad new direction

    Twitter has made two small changes that indicate a big shift in direction for everybody's favorite microblogging service

  • Rethinking communications regulation

    Federal legislation on communications policy predates all the changes brought about by the Internet. It's time to address Internet regulation directly.

  • The trouble with trolls (and how to beat them)

    A vulnerable person. A sociopath or two on social media tormenting that person without consequence. That's trolling in a nutshell.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Patent trolls under attack, but not dead yet

    The patent wars keep going and going and we keep paying and paying.

  • Evan Schuman: Barnes & Noble plays into Amazon's hands

    Same-day delivery is a boon for the online leader, but it will only help doom B&N.

  • Google, Facebook go beyond social, beyond identity

    In order to understand the strange but spectacularly profitable world of Google and Facebook today, it's important to start in the fall of 2010.

  • Five reasons to build an enterprise app store ASAP

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • OkCupid -- it's not me, its you

    Remember the controversy over Facebook's social experimentation, which showed how people's emotions could be toyed with by changing what they see online? Well, Facebook wasn't the only site playing with your heart. Dating site OkCupid has now acknowledged doing much the same thing. The mostly free dating service is being very open about how it manipulated members' online dating lives and offers a detailed explanation that amounts to a version of "Hey, everybody's doing it."

  • Career advice: A plan for battling organizational politics

    Premier 100 IT Leader Karen Sullivan also answers questions on the value of undergraduate degrees and MBAs.

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