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  • Windows 10: Public enemy No. 1, or an OS like any other?

    It’s been denounced in the Russian parliament and reviled as a privacy nightmare — all for doing things that are common to all modern OSs.

  • A computer's place is in the kitchen

    Forget the living room. The kitchen is the true family hub now. Here's what Amazon is cooking up.

  • It was 20 years ago today ...

    20 years ago Microsoft released Windows 95, and the world lined up for it. 20 years later, things have changed.

  • Anyone see a problem with this plan?

    IT manager pilot fish is also a clinical psychologist, and he's worked out a way to piece together an electronic clinical records system for this large mental health center. Then his boss discovers the project.

  • Can mobile save the mall? Yes, but not how you think.

    In a world where shopping malls are losing customers by the escalator-load to more convenient and deeper-inventoried digital options, one mall in a lightly populated Nebraska town is making some impressive progress in getting its shoppers to stick around. It's not about bringing customers into the mall. It's about giving them reasons to come all the time — and not wanting to leave.

  • The first 29 days of Windows 10

    For a version of Windows on which Microsoft placed so much emphasis on upgrades, Windows 10 has a remarkable set of post-upgrade problems.

  • How big will Amazon's data get, and what does that mean for companies working with AWS?

    If Amazon Web Service is becoming a nearly ubiquitous technology, what does that mean for the future of data and how companies work with Amazon moving forward?

  • Oracle, still clueless about security

    Oracle Chief Security Officer Mary Ann Davidson let loose a long rant about people who dare to look into the security of the company’s products. Oracle quickly backed away from those remarks, but has it faced up to the fact that its CSO has some wrongheaded notions about her own area of expertise?

  • Hey Cortana, why can’t I use Siri on a Mac?

    You can use Cortana on a Mac, but not Siri. Why does this make sense?

  • Coke's movie theater trial shows beacon potential

    Retail beacons have huge potential, but it can only be met when chains move beyond seeing beacons solely as tiny ad broadcasters. Coca-Cola is starting to get creative about beacons, with a trial in Norway movie theaters to not merely communicate with moviegoers but to remember them for re-targeting later.

  • Bloomingdale's gift card glitch illustrates lack of oversight

    Bloomingdale's major gift card glitch illustrated two huge retail IT security issues. First, human approval of gift cards can avoid some big problems. Second, chains have almost no meaningful system for dealing with such glitches.

  • ASP.Net SignalR library builds apps that can communicate in real-time

    SignalR is an open source library written in .Net that simplifies the exchange of data between a web browser and a web server using WebSockets as a communication protocol. This article presents an in-depth discussion on SignalR.

  • Windows 10: Microsoft lays its smartphone ambitions to rest

    The company wants us to believe that Universal apps — usable on all Windows 10 devices — will save the day for Windows Phone. It’s already clear that won’t be happening.

  • Using clues to move paper coupons to mobile

    Printed coupons and mobile devices are as far apart as Bitcoins and silver dollars. One company that's been specializing in bridging the gap sees the answer in not looking at any one element and instead layering.

  • Nothing is ever completely outsourced

    An outsourced project is out of your hands, right? Well, no, not entirely. In fact, that belief is a common misconception that can lead to trouble.

  • Star Power: Lessons in recruiting from the world of sports

    As a corporate technology recruiter and sister-in-law of an NFL Hall of Famer, I've had a front-row view of how star talent is recruited. Turns out, building a winning team is surprisingly similar in the corporate and sports worlds.--

  • IT must map its way to visibility

    We in IT need to lead. Within the enterprise, we need to be perceived as leaders. We need to articulate the value we bring to the table.  

  • Why I won't write a requiem for Google+

    Over the last couple years, this TechWatch blog has been home to requiems for a number of products and services that have either died or pretty much died, collapsing to the point where they no longer resemble their once-great former selves.

  • How Facebook, Apple and Twitter are ending online equality

    The latest trend in social networking is the rise of elitism.

  • For Linux, Supercomputers R Us

    Supercomputers are serious things, called on to do serious computing. They tend to be engaged in serious pursuits like atomic bomb simulations, climate modeling and high-level physics. Naturally, they cost serious money. At the very top of the latest <a href="http://www.top500.org/">Top500</a> supercomputer ranking is the Tianhe-2 supercomputer at China's National University of Defense Technology. It cost about $390 million to build.