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  • Coder, sell thyself

    Many highly skilled coders limit themselves to obscurity or the bonds of employment because they are afraid of selling their own services. They have an inherent fear of sales and of being a salesperson. What they don't realize is that with a shift in thinking and some business building activities, they can win clients, launch a prosperous and independent business, and experience high levels of personal and professional freedom without ever having to sell to anyone.

  • At Microsoft, quality seems to be job none

    I actually had been feeling optimistic about Windows 10. No, really. You can look it up. I mean, I didn't think Windows 10 was the greatest thing since the advent of the Internet, but it did strike me as a solid replacement for the lamentable Windows 8.

  • Do you know the laws that govern personal information in the cloud?

    While the technological world increasingly renders geography meaningless, no one appears to have informed lawmakers of this fact. Data can move easily and seamlessly from Uruguay to Spain to the United States, but in doing so, three separate data privacy and protection regimes are implicated. As more companies, individuals and even governments place their data in the cloud, both customers and providers of cloud computing services must become acutely aware of the burgeoning laws and regulations restricting the collection, storage, disclosure and movement of certain categories of information.

  • Why Google should leave Europe

    Spanish lawmakers did something dumb this week. They passed a new law that forces Google to pay news publishers a fee for sending valuable, monetizable content from Google News to their sites.

  • Intelligence community must get its own house in order

    Earlier this month, Robert Hannigan, the director of GCHQ, a British intelligence agency, wrote an opinion piece in the Financial Times castigating tech companies for being "in denial" about abuses of their platforms by criminals and terrorists and calling on them to develop better arrangements for facilitating lawful government investigations. While there is certainly much room for improved cooperation between government and the private sector, the first step for reform should be for intelligence agencies like GCHQ to take a hard look in the mirror.

  • What happens next in the Cisco suit against Arista?

    Arista Networks' stock took it on the chin when Cisco slapped the company with patent infringement and copyright law suits last Friday, losing almost 20% of its value at one point as investors and others mulled the long term implications of the suits.

  • Why the FAA's drone rules should never get off the ground

    It's hard to believe, but it's illegal to fly a drone in the U.S. for commercial purposes.

  • Obama's Internet plan plays favorites, and Netflix is one of the darlings

    President Obama recently announced his plan to regulate the Internet under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act. This law nurtured America's telephone monopoly for 50 years. Under the president's plan, Internet service would be treated like a public utility, subject to rate regulation and state utilities commission oversight. The plan Obama proposes to prevent Internet service providers (ISP) from playing favorites with content ironically reveals him to be playing favorites with content providers such as Netflix.

  • Doing digital right

    If analysts are right, worldwide technology spending will total $3.8 trillion this year. A significant chunk of that money will be devoted to re-engineering business processes and customer experiences for the digital world. And unfortunately much of it will be wasted.

  • Uber scandal highlights Silicon Valley's bad behavior

    Car service app Uber found itself in trouble again when top executive Emil Michael was caught at a dinner party suggesting that the company hire opposition researchers to dig up dirt on the (predominantly female) journalists who have been asking uncomfortable questions about the crazy successful car service startup caught up in scandal after scandal.

  • Getting your board's buy-in on cybersecurity

    High-profile data breaches continue to make news, and you can bet that your board of directors has noticed. Breaches can result in huge remediation costs, litigation and lost revenues resulting from a damaged reputation. Board members pay attention to those things.

  • Rise of the celebrity tech entrepreneur

    California is a house divided, with global entertainment powerhouse Hollywood in the south -- epicenter of the movie, TV and music businesses -- and global technology powerhouse Silicon Valley in the north.

  • Hey Samsung: Not everybody has to be a platform

    It's easy to see why everybody wants to be a platform these days. Just look at Apple: By owning both the hardware and the operating system, it gets total control over what developers build on its platform -- and a sizable cut of the revenues besides. In return, developers get an unmatched distribution channel directly to customers' devices. As Apple extends to new devices, those developers get to come along.

  • Microsoft awakes

    We may be witnessing the beginning of a turnaround for one of the mainstay companies of the IT industry: Microsoft. And by turnaround, I don't mean financially. Microsoft is a prodigious revenue and profit generator. But the company has been rudderless for years. It has essentially been reactive, not an industry leader. It's been resting on its laurels.

  • An open email to Google Inbox

    Dear Google Inbox:

  • Silicon Valley's next disruption: Reality!

    We're right on the edge of dual revolutions in artificial reality and augmented reality. It's an exciting time because we're in the final days of a world in which these technologies are considered "futuristic." By next year, early adopters will have them in their homes. Within three years they'll be mainstream.

  • Google's takedown policy: Celebrity nudes today, your right to know tomorrow?

    Google last week did something that is really hard to find objectionable: It said it deleted quite a few ("tens of thousands") nude pictures stolen from celebrities. But as with anything that involves such an influential company as Google, this move creates a precedent, and it's a dangerous one.

  • Slow Internet links got you down? It's Dyn to the rescue

    As businesses extend their reach to more corners of the world, wouldn't it be nice if you could monitor any Internet service provider from any location? Thankfully, Dyn, which sells DNS management tools, acquired Renesys earlier this year and extended the features of the Renesys' Internet Intelligence product.

  • What Windows 10 means for the enterprise

    Microsoft rolled out the widely anticipated Windows Technical Preview yesterday morning, playing to a handpicked crowd of Microsoft reporters and analysts. Although Microsoft didn't have the technical will to broadcast the event live, you can see a recording of the 40-minute presentation on YouTube.

  • Microsoft Announces Microsoft Windows 10!

    In San Francisco today, Microsoft announced the hotly await "next version" of Windows as being Windows 10. Windows 10 was designed and built for universal access by phones, tablets, and desktops.

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