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  • 10 ways to fix Google+

    Google+ turns four next month.

  • IoT considerations for CIOs

    Gartner has predicted that by 2020 the Internet of Things will grow to 26 billion objects. (This excludes smartphones, tablets and PCs, which will account for a separate 7.3 billion devices, Gartner adds.) With these kinds of staggering numbers, there is a disruption in the making -- and we CIOs need to be ready for it.

  • Will Windows 10 be ready this summer? No way. Will it ship? Count on it.

    AMD CEO Lisa Su let the cat out of the bag: Microsoft will be releasing Windows 10 in late July.

  • Birth of an Internet independence movement

    The 20th anniversary of the privatization of the Internet deserves recognition by the U.S. Congress and celebration by all Americans as "Internet Independence Day." Two decades ago, on April 30, 1995, the Internet was privatized with the decommissioning of the NSFNET backbone.

  • How to get a better outsourcing deal

    IT leaders can't expect to have the upper hand in an outsourcing negotiation. Whether you're negotiating the initial contract, an extension or a change order, the outsourcer normally has the advantage.

  • What does HP think it's doing?

    Winston Churchill once said of Russia, "It is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma." Now, I don't deal with international politics. I just write about technology. But when I've looked at HP lately I've been left thinking of its strategy as, well, "a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."

  • Target's under-stocked sale: Lessons not learned

    In retail -- and especially in e-commerce -- there's a nuanced distinction between having a very popular sale and arranging for far too little merchandise. It's like those hold recordings that say the lengthy hold time is because of high customer call volume, prompting most people to mumble, "That and the fact that you're too cheap to hire enough call center operators."

  • Sony reminds us all what a pathetically weak link email is

    Sony is reliving the nightmare that its hacked databases gave rise to late last year, now that Wikileaks has thoughtfully published all of the leaked documents in a searchable database. Really, they are the most courteous hoodlums ever.

  • Canadian banks play hard ball with Apple Pay's moving north

    Apple Pay is poised to cross the border into Canada this fall, but some Canadian banks are reportedly concerned that Apple wants a bigger cut of each transaction than it takes in the U.S.

  • Discovering a blind eye to vulnerabilities

    Last week, I was horrified to discover a problem with my vulnerability scanner. The product I use relies on a user account to connect to our Microsoft Windows servers and workstations to check them for vulnerable versions of software, and that user account had never been configured properly. As a result, the scanner has been blind to a lot of vulnerabilities. And this has been going on for a long time.

  • What is artificial intelligence?

    What is artificial intelligence (AI), and what is the difference between general AI and narrow AI?

  • Tech's peculiar relationship with social justice

    Tech giants including Salesforce, Apple and Yelp have been out front in their criticism of the new law in Indiana that allows businesses to discriminate against gay customers. That criticism is a good thing. Businesses have a role in not just selling things to people, but in doing good and in making sure that companies and the marketplace operate equitably. And it's right that technology companies are leading the fight against the Indiana law, because tech is the most forward-looking of industries.

  • Let's rethink email

    I've been using email longer than most people (more than a quarter of a century), so I think I have the credibility to say it's overdue for an overhaul.

  • Three lies about Google Glass

    Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt shocked everyone last week by telling The Wall Street Journal that Google isn't killing Google Glass.

  • iOS 8 hate

    Enough is enough. Apple's iOS 8 mobile operating system came out in mid-September. Since then, the company has delivered seven -- count 'em, seven -- patch releases, and iOS 8 still doesn't work that well. Argh!

  • Microsoft Outlook Calendar Corruption, Lost Meetings, Duplicate Appointments - April/2015 Update

    Over the past 5-yrs, organizations have complained about Microsoft Outlook calendaring problems where users describe issues of calendar appointments not showing up, meeting appointments disappearing, calendar delegate issues occurring, just overall "odd" behavior of calendars. It usually happens in mixed environments where some users are Apple Mac users, and some users (frequently the exec admin / delegate) running Windows, and typically active use of iPhones, iPads, Android, or other mobile devices and tablets. And over the past 5-yrs, I have actively blogged about the problem and the solution to FIX the calendaring inconsistencies.

  • We've got net neutrality. Now the real work begins.

    Now that net neutrality is the law of the land, you may feel inclined to pat yourself on the back for a job well done. After all, a big reason the FCC backed net neutrality was the outpouring of support for it.

  • Why Facebook Messenger will fail as a 'platform'

    Now we know why Facebook ripped Messenger out of the mobile version of the Facebook app last April: Messenger was destined to become a "platform" in its own right, complete with an API and developer program to help and encourage software companies to make Facebook Messenger-specific apps.

  • The signs of spring: Birds, flowers and new tech

    Back in the dark ages, when the only way to get onscreen entertainment was by tuning in a television set at a specific time (get home late? miss your favorite show? too bad for you!), networks had a habit of scheduling similar shows opposite each other. The notion was presumably, that the competition would cause one show to win out over the other, which would eventually drop in the ratings and get cancelled. The idea that viewers might be interested in seeing both apparently was not in the networks' psychology.

  • Where's the data?

    It's a time-honored tradition: U.S. businesses find ways to skirt inconvenient or expensive laws by moving operations to other countries. Thus we have had U.S. corporations operating overseas to exploit child labor, run sweatshops or avoid taxes and rigorous health and safety inspections. Now the U.S. government says something similar is happening in regards to email.