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  • The signs of spring: Birds, flowers and new tech

    Back in the dark ages, when the only way to get onscreen entertainment was by tuning in a television set at a specific time (get home late? miss your favorite show? too bad for you!), networks had a habit of scheduling similar shows opposite each other. The notion was presumably, that the competition would cause one show to win out over the other, which would eventually drop in the ratings and get cancelled. The idea that viewers might be interested in seeing both apparently was not in the networks' psychology.

  • Where's the data?

    It's a time-honored tradition: U.S. businesses find ways to skirt inconvenient or expensive laws by moving operations to other countries. Thus we have had U.S. corporations operating overseas to exploit child labor, run sweatshops or avoid taxes and rigorous health and safety inspections. Now the U.S. government says something similar is happening in regards to email.

  • Understanding the Meerkat live-streaming magic

    You're going to be hearing a lot about a new app called Meerkat.

  • Don't get into an email mess

    Though she may have broken no laws, Hillary Clinton acted irresponsibly in using a personal email account to conduct official U.S. government business in her capacity as secretary of State.

  • Web browsers are also to blame for Lenovo's Superfish fiasco

    Lenovo pre-installing Superfish software was a security disaster. Whether Lenovo was evil, or, as they eventually claimed, merely incompetent, it's hard to trust them going forward. If nothing else, their initial denials that anything was wrong, leave a lasting impression. Of course, Superfish, along with the software that they bundled from Komodia, also deserve plenty of blame for breaking the security of HTTPS and SSL/TLS.

  • 5 steps for transforming your business using data

    Organisations that were born digital are built around their IT platform, and all their business processes are IT-driven and data-powered. Every action, every decision, is based on the processing of data sets about users and customers, about usage patterns, external conditions, etc.

  • Pulling net neutrality from a swamp of lies

    On Feb. 26, the Federal Communications Commission voted, along strict party lines, to approve new net neutrality rules by reclassifying broadband as a regulated public utility. So does that save the Internet or lock it up in a bureaucratic, censored, expensive prison?

  • Confessions of a technobiophiliac

    Smartphone makers like Apple, Samsung and others have flirted with different materials to make their smartphones -- metal, plastic, even glass front and back with the iPhone 4 line.

  • Rating the payment options

    Several electronic and mobile payment options have become available, but most of us in the U.S. are still using plain-vanilla credit and debit cards with magnetic stripes. They use technology that dates to the first Nixon administration. That's not a problem in itself; I have no problem with time-tested security measures that work effectively. But just look around: Data breaches are everywhere, and those magnetic-stripe cards are often implicated.

  • The FCC's Orwellian Internet policy

    President Obama's secret plan to protect the "open Internet" is locked inside the Federal Communications Commission. We don't know what's in the 322 pages, but we are told it includes a transparency rule.

  • Tech toys train tots for a troubling tomorrow

    Toys always reflect the larger culture -- its biases, fears and, most of all, its technology. New York's Toy Fair 2015 happened this week, and the latest round of new tech toys is bringing some of the most disturbing tech trends to children.

  • No one is too small to hack

    As the White House and Congress consider new cybersecurity legislation, some middle-market companies may still be questioning whether the cybersecurity crisis is a real threat for their businesses.

  • Why Apple is the most successful company in history

    Everyone knows that Apple had a great fourth quarter and that its most successful product line, the iPhone, is doing better than ever, too.

  • Patent trolls: Congress gets down to business

    White Castle might not be the first company that comes to mind when high tech is mentioned, but the restaurant chain found itself in the middle of the patent troll controversy when it started sending menu updates from its headquarters to digital screens in restaurants around the country.

  • The ‘sophisticated attack' myth

    Sometimes I wonder whether any company will ever fall victim to an unsophisticated cyberattack. Because after every attack that comes to light, we hear that same excuse: It was a sophisticated attack.

  • A lot of private-sector data is also used for public good

    As the private sector continues to invest in data-driven innovation, the capacity for society to benefit from this data collection grows as well. Much has been said about how the private sector is using the data it collects to improve corporate bottom lines, but positive stories about how that data contributes to the greater public good are largely unknown.

  • It's time for the chip-and-PIN'ing of America

    Thank goodness for that signature on the back of my credit card. If it weren't for that smudged scrawl, a thief might steal my card (or card number) and make fraudulent purchases. Or steal my identity. Right.

  • Can you trust Amazon's WorkMail?

    When Amazon unveiled its cloud-based corporate WorkMail email offering last week (Jan. 28), it stressed the high-level of encryption it would use and the fact that corporate users would control their own decryption keys. But Amazon neglected to mention that it will retain full access to those messages -- along with the ability to both analyze data for e-commerce marketing and to give data to law enforcement should subpoenas show up.

  • 'Parks And Recreation,' Facebook and The New Privacy

    If you tuned into Parks And Recreation Tuesday night, you were treated to an episode where social media startup Gryzzl attempts to win over the hearts and minds of its  new neighbors in the fictional town of Pawnee with boxes full of gifts, delivered via Amazon-esque drones.

  • HoloLens: Look who's innovating

    Poor, slow-footed old Microsoft. It just can't adapt to changing times or keep up with more innovative, agile and forward-looking companies like Apple and Google. That's been the way many of us have thought of Microsoft for a long time. But it may be our thinking that's old and outdated.