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  • Solidifying Microsoft Azure Security for SharePoint and SQL in the Cloud

    More and more organizations are moving SharePoint and SQL workloads into Microsoft Azure in the cloud because of the simplicity of spinning up servers in the cloud, adding more capacity, decreasing capacity without having to BUY servers on-premise. What used to cost organizations $20,000, $50,000, or more in purchasing servers, storage, network bandwidth, replica disaster recovery sites, etc and delay SharePoint and SQL rollouts by weeks or month is now completely managed by spinning up virtual machines up in Azure and customizing and configuring systems in the Cloud.

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Bye, Nokia, nice knowing you

    Nokia, once a great company and the pride of Finland, is shuffling to its grave under Microsoft's leadership.

  • Julia King: We're all data scientists now

    It's up to each one of us to figure out what in the daily surge of data is useful, what's crap and what's truly valuable.

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    Preston Gralla: Jeff Bezos hates you

    But he's quite fond of your credit card.

  • Who should really worry about Apple/IBM? Microsoft

    So Apple and IBM are hooking up. It's a match made in enterprise heaven, bringing together BYOD favorites the iPhone and the iPad with enterprise apps and cloud services from IBM. It's a win for Apple, which finally gets some serious business software chops, and for IBM, which gets device sex appeal.

  • Apple and IBM: A winning combo for IT

    One thing is clear about the Apple-IBM partnership: It will change the dynamic of the enterprise mobility market in significant ways.

  • Timeline: How Apple's iOS gained enterprise cred

    In the seven years since the first iPhone arrived, iOS has morphed from a consumer-centric OS into one with a wealth of enterprise-worthy features.

  • Kenneth van Wyk: We can't just blame users

    Yes, users sometimes do stupid things. Some always will. But developers need to do more to save users from themselves.

  • Why we need an underground Google

    There has never been a search engine that accurately reflects the Internet.

  • Facebook is a school yard bully that's going down

    Facebook has grown and evolved in recent years. In addition to connecting people online, it bombards users with unnecessary ads and useless sponsored stories. And it runs experiments on its users. Columnist Alex Burinskiy is not amused.

  • Evan Schuman: What if you can't trust your inbox?

    Goldman Sachs is taking Google to court to force the cloud vendor to delete an email accidentally sent to a Gmail user. The consequences of a ruling for Goldman would be devastating.

  • Microsoft Azure ML -- Big Data Modeling in Azure

    Microsoft has jumped in with both feet with the release to Preview of a new Microsoft Azure-based tool that helps organizations do Machine Learning and predictive analysis all from a Web console.

  • Board of directors will have a profound impact on cybersecurity

    According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, corporate boards are getting much more involved in cybersecurity. What's driving this behavior? While the Target breach probably influenced this behavior, corporate boards now realize that cybersecurity has become a pervasive risk that could have an adverse impact on all businesses.

  • IT Operations Analytics (ITOA) provides real time monitoring of large volumes of data

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Facebook's icky psychology experiment is actually business as usual

    Unless you've been living under a rock for the last couple weeks, you've no doubt heard about Facebook's creepy, secret, psychological experiment designed to see if negative newsfeed posts inspire more negativity -- and vice versa. I don't want to excuse Facebook's behavior, which has prompted a (sort-of) apology from Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, as well as an ongoing stream of condemnation and outrage from legitimate psychologists and Internet commentators. I too was weirded out by the revelations, feeling manipulated and that somehow my privacy had been unfairly invaded without my permission.

  • Google shows Apple how to buy a music service

    Google bought Songza this week. The company makes a music app that competes with Pandora, Rdio, Spotify, Beats Music, iTunes Radio and other music services.

  • Bankers beware: Technology is going to get you (and none of us will care)

    Technology is about to take a big slice of the traditional banking business. Bankers have been slow to see what's coming, but they're starting to realize what's at stake.

  • WIth iWatch looming, Microsoft plans its own fitness wearable as Woz tosses aside his Galaxy Gear

    With the iWatch rumoured to launch sometime this fall, competitors like Microsoft aren't sitting idly by. According to a recent report from longtime Microsoft watcher, Paul Thurrott, the folks in Redmond are prepping their own wearable device that will have a decidedly fitness oriented bent.

  • Why Google bought Songza: The music industry's third revolution

    Pandora and Spotify sparked a music revolution of sorts when they began convincing consumers that they did not need to own their music to enjoy it. Mobile analytics firm Flurry's CEO Simon Khalaf noted in a talk he gave at Source 14 that MP3 purchases were declining while streamed consumption was exploding.

  • Has Microsoft finally realised PCs are different than tablets?

    If recently published reports are to be believed, Microsoft is finally realizing something I've been saying ever since Windows 8 first reared its ugly head: the so-called Modern (formerly Metro) tile interface may work fine on smartphones and tablets, but it basically throws traditional computers under the bus. The Windows 8 start screen is just plain silly on traditional computers.