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  • There's no bubble in business Wi-Fi, Aerohive CEO says

    Aerohive Networks sells not just enterprise Wi-Fi gear but also cloud-based software designed to make it easier to set up and manage a customer's entire wired and wireless network. Other wireless LAN vendors are moving in the same direction, including Cisco Systems, the biggest seller of enterprise Wi-Fi, which acquired Meraki Networks in 2012.

  • The Grill: Guess CIO Michael Relich takes on his dream job: COO

    As executive vice president and CIO at Guess Inc., Michael Relich oversaw the retailer's global IT strategy and a worldwide IT staff of more than 100 people. His nine-year tenure in the position earned him a spot as one of four finalists for the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium's CIO Leadership Award for 2013. Relich's work also earned him a nod from Guess CEO and co-founder Paul Marciano, who in August named him the company's new COO. In announcing Relich's appointment, Marciano cited his strong operational skills, strategic vision and leadership in retail technology.

  • Minecraft's Notch revealed in behind-the-scenes tale

    The wildly popular game "Minecraft" is a lot like its creator, Markus "Notch" Persson: modest in style and origin and apparently still true to its roots despite phenomenal success. In their new book just published in the U.S., authors Daniel Goldberg and Linus Larsson go behind the scenes to tell the story of how their shy fellow Swede became the indie games industry's first real rock star.

  • The Grill: Rosetta Stone CIO Pradeep Mannakkara makes a rapid move to the cloud

    When Pradeep Mannakkara took the CIO position at Rosetta Stone, he encountered an IT infrastructure that was nearly the same age as the 21-year-old language-learning company. So Mannakkara established a plan to not only update, but also transform Rosetta Stone's technology stack and its 70-person IT department. Since starting in 2011, he has shifted much of the aging infrastructure to cloud-based platforms and added more mobile applications and state-of-the-art technologies. He says the changes achieved his goals of enabling a more efficient workflow and fostering innovation, while also increasing the strategic value of the IT organization.

  • The Grill: Gino Pokluda gains control of an unwieldy database system

    Gino Pokluda had a problem: The database system at Presbyterian Health Plan in Albuquerque, N.M., where Pokluda serves as manager of service improvement and innovation, was becoming increasingly expensive and unwieldy, requiring about 80TB of storage for 13 database environments. To gain control, Pokluda implemented Delphix software to enable agile data management and eliminate redundant infrastructure. The 2012 project sliced his storage needs to 35TB, even though his team now maintains 23 environments. Here Pokluda, who manages all production, test and development environments for the company, discusses the database system overhaul and shares other IT management insights.

  • Intel President James on wearable tech, Microsoft partnership

    After calculators, PCs and mobile phones, Intel is now jumping into wearable devices with an extremely low-power chip called Quark, which was big news at the company's annual Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco. Leading the charge into the new market is Intel's new leadership team consisting of CEO Brian Krzanich and President Renee James, who also articulated on plans to achieve fast growth in the mobile market while trying to reinvigorate PC sales.

  • You can't make it run better if you don't know where the problem lies

    Riverbed Technology is best known for its WAN optimization tools, but the company has branched out over the years through multiple acquisitions. Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Eric Wolford, president of the company's Products Group, to see how the company is trying to help customers squeeze more efficiency out of their IT resources.

  • Cloud computing causing rethinking of disaster recovery

    Cloud computing gives organisations the opportunity to rethink many traditional IT practices, but it may be a particularly good fit for disaster recovery and business continuity.

  • The Grill: Kathy Moore, CIO, West Virginia Health Information Exchange

    The West Virginia Health Information Network was created by the state of West Virginia and charged with building a secure electronic health information system so providers could access and exchange patient data. The goal is to improve the quality of patient information and thereby enable providers to more quickly offer better care at lower costs. Among those leading the effort is Kathy Moore, CIO of the network. Moore is now working with hospitals and other healthcare providers in the state to get them connected to the exchange. "The exchange is now up and live, and we're focused on rollout and bringing on as many as possible," says Moore, a former deputy CTO for the state of West Virginia. Here she shares her thoughts on leading this huge IT project.

  • Google making steady progress in the enterprise

    Google Enterprise is making inroads on many fronts, winning converts to everything from its productivity tools to its cloud offerings. We recently caught up with President of Google Enterprise, Amit Singh, for a progress report and to discuss what comes next.

  • HP Q&A: Converged Cloud is company's chief initiative

    Saar Gillai, named head of Hewlett-Packard's Cloud operations in January, is on the hot seat.

  • Interview: Dell software chief talks transformation

    John Swainson has one of the more challenging jobs in the tech industry right now. As president of Dell's software division, he's charged with sorting through all the software Dell has acquired and organizing it into coherent offerings that can further its effort to become a more profitable, software- and services-driven company.

  • Oracle's Mark Hurd talks Fusion Applications, customer satisfaction and SAP's HANA

    As co-president of Oracle, Mark Hurd is tasked with selling an ever-increasing array of new software and hardware products, such as the Exadata database machine and Fusion Applications, while figuring out how to keep the company's vast installed base happy and fending off competition from the likes of SAP.

  • UEFI president: We need more key providers

    Since its introduction, the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface has created a fair amount of controversy. UEFI was created through an industry consortium as an evolutionary step up from BIOS, the simple firmware long used when starting a computer to initialize all the components and load the operating system. Among its advanced features, UEFI includes an option called Secure Boot, which requires that any software used before the operating system starts, or after it shuts down, has been signed by a certificate authority.

  • NetSuite CEO Zach Nelson talks growth, strategy and life with Oracle

    NetSuite is one of the SaaS (software as a service) market's pioneers, having sold its growing family of ERP (enterprise resource planning), e-commerce and other applications since 1998. The vendor's results have been beating Wall Street's predictions, and may yet again in a few weeks, when NetSuite is expected to announce its fourth-quarter and year-end results.

  • Zend CEO: PHP is fit for the enterprise

    PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor) is a well-established server-side dynamic language platform for Web development. Among its many users have been important Web properties such as SugarCRM and the Drupal content management system. Perhaps the top promoter of PHP is Zend Technologies, which offers an application server and development tools for PHP and stresses PHP usage in enterprises.

  • The Grill: Orlando Health CIO Rick Schooler's vision of healthcare IT

    Orlando Health VP and CIO Rick Schooler talks about how analytics is transforming healthcare. Insider (registration required)

  • Red Hat CEO: We're the cloud leader -- with Linux

    Jim Whitehurst says it's not just Red Hat's products, but its philosophy that place it at the forefront of cloud computing

  • MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor on implications of 'the mobile wave'

    MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor's big interest these days is "the mobile wave," which refers to a re-ordering of technology and modern life through the proliferation of iPads, smartphones and the increasingly sophisticated software that runs on them.

  • Epicor CEO Pervez Qureshi talks company's renewal, SaaS and growth plans

    Following last year's merger with Activant Solutions, ERP (enterprise resource planning) vendor Epicor is closing in on US$1 billion in revenue, a figure that belies the vendor's relatively low profile compared to giants such as Oracle and SAP.

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