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  • Charter-Time Warner deal would get tough regulatory scrutiny

    Charter Communications' planned acquisition of Time Warner Cable faces a regulatory review by the same federal officials who were widely blamed for nixing the recent proposed merger of Time Warner with Comcast.

  • How the cloud helped police warm up to body-worn cameras

    The technology for body-worn cameras has been around for years, but it wasn't until this past year that law enforcement agencies have moved to adopt them in significant numbers.

  • Java at 20: How it changed programming forever

    Remembering what the programming world was like in 1995 is no easy task. Object-oriented programming, for one, was an accepted but seldom practiced paradigm, with much of what passed as so-called object-oriented programs being little more than rebranded C code that used >> instead of printf and class instead of struct. The programs we wrote those days routinely dumped core due to pointer arithmetic errors or ran out of memory due to leaks. Source code could barely be ported between different versions of Unix. Running the same binary on different processors and operating systems was crazy talk.

  • Java at 20: Its successes, failures, and future

    Although Java was developed at Sun Microsystems, Oracle has served as the platform's steward since acquiring Sun in early 2010. During that time, Oracle has released Java 7 and Java 8, with version 9 due up next year. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke to Oracle's Georges Saab, vice president of software development for the Java Platform Group, about the occasion of Java's 20th anniversary.

  • Java at 20: The JVM, Java's other big legacy

    Think of Java, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this week, and your first thoughts most likely go to the language itself. But underneath the language is a piece of technology that has a legacy at least as important and powerful as Java itself: the Java virtual machine, or JVM.

  • Java at 20: The programming juggernaut rolls on

    What began as an experiment in consumer electronics in the early 1990s celebrates its 20th anniversary as a staple of enterprise computing this week. Java has become a dominant platform, able to run wherever the Java Virtual Machine is supported, forging ahead despite the rise of rival languages and recent tribulations with security.

  • What if Windows went open source tomorrow?

    Thinking out loud about Microsoft making Windows an open source project is a great way to get your friends and colleagues wondering seriously about your mental health. It's an idea strange enough to sound practically paradoxical, like "hot ice" or "short Pink Floyd songs."

  • If Windows 10 is the 'last version,' it needs names

    With Microsoft saying that Windows 10 "is the last version of Windows", the company may have a naming problem.

  • Could Tesla Energy's batteries blow up Elon Musk's company?

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk is no stranger to risky but successful ventures. He's helped found companies such as PayPal and other leading edge tech firms, including an aerospace manufacturer to help colonize Mars.

  • Collaboration companies argue their case at Demo Traction

    The recent Demo Traction event showcased a host of young companies that are gaining market momentum.  Each gave their pitch and then answered to a panel of judges.  If it is important for you to stay on the up and up with emerging technologies, this is must watch stuff.

  • Big data companies argue their case at Demo Traction

    The recent Demo Traction event showcased a host of young companies that are gaining market momentum.  Each gave their pitch and then answered to a panel of judges.  If it is important for you to stay on the up and up with emerging technologies, this is must watch stuff.

  • Debunking the myths dogging the hybrid cloud

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Cisco's Chambers: A retrospective

    You don't become one of the most admired and successful CEOs in Silicon Valley and in all of business by doing many things wrong.

  • The science behind alert fatigue: How to turn down the noise so you can hear the signal

    You've likely experienced alert fatigue at some point in your life. You feel exasperated as your phone pings for what seems like the hundredth time in a day, or your eyes glaze over as a glut of new analytics data rolls in. You feel resigned to the fact that an influx of email could very well go on forever.

  • What happens when computer science conferences go Gangnam Style

    Those who hand out the Ig Nobel prizes, awarded for the most outlandish scientific research, would do well to check up on CHI.

  • 21 tips for making Android a better personal assistant

    Android devices can do all sorts of wizardry these days -- everything from taking your heartbeat to turning off the lights in your bedroom. But sometimes, it's the simple stuff that matters the most.

  • Security for the Internet of Everything: Turning the network Into a giant sensor

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • In case you aren't suitably impressed by the scale of Amazon Web Services

    Although the video has been up for awhile, if you haven't had the chance to watch Amazon Web Service's VP & Distinguished Engineer James Hamilton spell out AWS facts at the re:Invent conference last November, do yourself a favor and pull up a chair. Fascinating stuff that gives you some insight into the rapidly evolving world of cloud computing.

  • With EU challenging Google, this time 'stakes are high'

    With the European Commission leveling antitrust charges against Google, the company should be bracing itself for a big and potentially costly fight over its dominant search business.

  • Nokia Alcatel-Lucent deal would make a complementary patent portfolio

    The possible acquisition of Alcatel-Lucent of France by Finland-based Nokia would bring together complementary patent portfolios and increase their scale against larger global competitors, analysts said Tuesday.