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  • Oracle's Larry Ellison downshifts, but leadership remains the same

    Don't mistake Larry Ellison's decision Thursday to step down as CEO of Oracle as a big change.

  • Why the entry-level iPhone 6 has just 16GB of storage

    The eagerly awaited iPhone 6 announced last week offers a larger screen, more processing power and -- in the base model -- the same 16GB of storage as the two-year-old  iPhone 5.

  • 7 reasons Apple should open-source Swift -- and 7 reasons it won't

    Faster innovation, better security, new markets -- the case for opening Swift might be more compelling than Apple will admit

  • Debunking the top open source myths

    Today many IT executives choose open source over proprietary software for everything from cloud computing to facilitating teamwork among remote workers. Open source increases security and privacy, encourages an engaged community and offers the ability to "look under the hood" to diagnose and resolve issues quickly.

  • A common theme in identity and access management failure: lack of Active Directory optimization

    From the vantage point of most people, even technical folks, Active Directory (AD) seems like it's doing pretty well. How often can you not log in when you sit down at your PC? How often do you fail to find someone in the corporate directory in Outlook? How many times have you heard of an AD outage?

  • Here's what free upgrades could do for Windows 9's uptake

    By making Windows 9, aka "Threshold," free, Microsoft will be able to push more than half of all Windows 8 users to the upgrade within a matter of months, an analysis of user share data shows.

  • VMWorld 2014: Winners and Losers

    VMWorld 2014 was a whirlwind. The conference last week attracted 22,000 attendees, more than 250 exhibitors and spread across all three buildings of the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco over a five-day period.

  • Windows 8's uptake climbs but still trails Vista's

    Windows 8's uptake came unstuck last month and shoved into a forward gear for the first time since May, but the OS trailed Windows Vista's tempo of six years ago, according to data published Monday.

  • Boston's Bolt launches hardware companies

    Watch the first episode in our new series Breakout Startups here.

  • Did Microsoft help seed the market for Windows Store scam apps?

    Microsoft has finally begun cleaning out the Windows Store by killing 1,500 scams and copycat apps. But by turning the other way when bad apps were uploaded, and maybe even paying for them, Microsoft was part of the problem.

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    Meet Cobol's hard core fans

    Some of the world's largest businesses say their Cobol application infrastructure, running on state-of-the-art big iron, still delivers a powerful competitive advantage. The challenge going forward will be staffing it.

  • Cloud BI: Going where the data lives

    Historically, cloud BI has been mostly used by smaller businesses, but larger enterprises are starting to make the trek.

  • Supervalu breach shows why move to smartcards is long overdue

    The data breach disclosed by Supervalu is another reminder about why the ongoing migration of the US payment system to smartcard technology can't happen fast enough.

  • How risky will it be to run old IE after Microsoft's 2016 patch stoppage?

    Microsoft's decision to stop patching older versions of Internet Explorer in 17 months may not be as big a show-stopper as many assume.

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    Deja vu all over again: Windows 7 will be the new XP

    Even as enterprises try to get rid of their last Windows XP machines, Gartner analysts are urging them to start planning for the end of Windows 7.

  • IoT is here and there, but not everywhere yet

    The Internet of Things is still too hard. Even some of its biggest backers say so.

  • 3D printing makes its move into production

    The use of 3D printing for finished goods is about to disrupt manufacturing and supply chains in a big way. Here's why, and here's how IT will be critical to that transition.

  • 15 technologies changing how developers work

    A long time ago, developers wrote assembly code that ran fast and light. On good days, they had enough money in their budget to hire someone to toggle all those switches on the front of the machine to input their code. On bad days, they flipped the switches themselves. Life was simple: The software loaded data from memory, did some arithmetic, and sent it back. That was all.

  • How Claure can fix Sprint as it battles T-Mobile

    What can incoming Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure do to reverse the carrier's declining subscriber base?

  • Flexibility, asking questions key for recent college graduates looking to advance in IT

    When Cathy Lee started working at New York startup Faith Street last year, she quickly learned a lesson that could benefit other recent college graduates who want to advance their IT careers -- soft skills like being flexible, taking on new tasks and asking questions matter a lot.