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  • 2015 to test Microsoft's resolve and execution

    Microsoft faces not only its 40th anniversary in 2015, but a host of challenges that will define it for years to come, analysts said today.

  • From M2M to IoT: Old industries have to learn new tricks

    The Internet of Things may be a new idea, but machines talking to other machines is not.

  • The Sony breach may be start of new nation-state cyberattack

    It has been an exceptional year for IT security breaches, which have become part of an escalating trend in destructive attacks. And they're going to get worse.

  • Finding critical business data -- fast

    A lot of security processes failed during the breach of Target's systems during last year's holiday season, but one surprising revelation was that the retailer actually did receive security alerts about the malware in its system. Yet because the security team was bombarded with alerts -- estimated at hundreds per day -- it couldn't adequately prioritize them.

  • Cisco: See No EVO, Hear No EVO, Speak New Partnerships

    It hasn't been lost on the IT vendor community and IT professionals that Cisco is absent from the VMware EVO:RAIL partner program. With all of the powerhouses participating in the program, you'd think that Cisco would jump right into the mix. Considering Cisco's growth in the server market and the fact that it doesn't currently have its own storage play, this opportunity appears to be ideal for Cisco.

  • HP turns to 3D printing to revive flagging fortunes

    On top of its decision to split into two companies, Hewlett-Packard's move into 3D printing appears to be an attempt to spur revenues and rekindle a culture of innovation within the company.

  • When Microsoft says it will get 'creative' on Windows revenue, it may mean 'subscriptions'

    After Microsoft's chief operating officer last week said the company was going to change the Windows business model, analysts tried to figure out exactly what he meant.

  • Microsoft's alt-OS strategy strikes loyalists as class warfare

    Long-time Windows users may feel like second-class citizens as Microsoft continues to push its products and services onto alternate platforms, but the problem will clear up next year, analysts predicted today.

  • Digital SOS: How technology can save the USPS

    Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night can compare with the challenges currently facing the United States Postal Service. Email continues to have a crippling effect on the centuries-old agency: The volume of first-class mail, or stamped mail, plummeted by 2.8 billion pieces in 2013.

  • Microsoft throws away $315 million on failed Nook deal

    Microsoft took a big loss on its 2012 investment in Barnes & Noble, getting less than half of its original upfront $300 million back when the two firms parted ways today.

  • Displaced IT workers are being silenced

    A major problem with the H-1B debate is the absence of displaced IT workers in news media accounts. Much of the reporting is one-sided -- and there's a reason for this.

  • Cloud upstarts: Too cheap to trust?

    Hosting provider Atlantic.net launched a $0.99 per month cloud server this fall, which is significantly less expensive than the $0.013 per hour starting price for market-leader Amazon Web Services' on-demand Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) virtual machines.

  • Microsoft cold-shoulders Server 2003 and XP users hit with Microsoft Update error 0x80248015

    The causes of the problem remain cloudy, but the symptoms are quite clear. Starting on Nov. 18, some Server 2003, Windows Home Server 2003, and Windows XP SP3 machines suddenly refused to connect to Microsoft Update. As best I can tell, Microsoft has not responded to the problem, not documented a workaround, and is basically doing nothing visible to fix it.

  • Samsung needs more than a new top mobile guy

    Things are out of whack at Samsung and a number of fairly drastic changes are in store.

  • What developers can do to extend smartphone battery life

    Battery power consumption remains a lingering problem on smartphones -- and is getting worse with the latest advances in the devices. But developers can take steps to tackle the issue.

  • How Apple could exploit a forever-free iCloud

    While Google and Microsoft are using large amounts of free cloud storage to sell inexpensive consumer notebooks, Apple has stood above the fray.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.

  • Contain yourself: The layman's guide to Docker

    Welcome to the age of containerization, where an ecosystem led by startup Docker is leading IT organizations to ineffable peaks of efficiency, helping them scale their workloads ever-higher, and probably baking them a nice cake to boot (it's my birthday, I have cake on the brain, sue me). Microsoft, Google and Amazon Web Services are all tripping over themselves to make sure prospective customers know that their  clouds are the place to be if you want to get the most from Docker.

  • Gartner's Cloud showdown: Amazon Web Services vs. Microsoft Azure

    Gartner IaaS research director, Kyle Hilgendorf, says one of the most common questions he gets from enterprise customers looking to go to the Cloud is: AWS or Azure?

  • Why AT&T and Sprint just announced business conferencing services

    Separate announcements Tuesday for business conferencing services, one from AT&T and the other from Sprint, highlight the radically changing business models at U.S. wireless carriers.