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  • Salesforce at 15: Industry disruptor wards off midlife crisis

    Salesforce.com recently celebrated its 15th year in existence, and as the SaaS (software-as-a-service) vendor races toward US$5 billion in revenue its influence on the industry is being felt more than ever. At the same time, some signs indicate that Salesforce.com is having a few growing pains, as well as showing some trappings of the mega-vendors it once mocked with its "End of Software" marketing campaign.

  • U.S. commercial drone industry struggles to take off

    The U.S. commercial drone industry is still struggling to get off the ground more than two years after President Obama signed into law a bill that permits the civilian use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) over the country's airspace.

  • Windows' new normal shows software-as-a-service ambitions

    Microsoft's new updating "normal" for Windows -- a faster-paced tempo that demands customers apply releases within weeks -- is a first step in moving the OS to a services-style model. But companies may be leery of the change.

  • First-to-market means diddly when it comes to smartwatches

    The old wisdom that "first-to-market" technology products will win out gets thrown out the window when it comes to smartwatches and some other wearables.

  • AI gets its groove back

    Thanks to the advent of Big Data, new algorithms and massive, affordable computing power, artificial intelligence is now, finally, on a roll again.

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    Broadband faces a fork in the road

    As Google and AT&T race to provide super-fast 1 gigabit fiber networks to power users, more than a quarter of U.S. homes still have no broadband service at all.

  • At Build, mobility gets a boost with universal Windows apps

    Microsoft's announcement of universal Windows apps demonstrates the company's commitment to improving its share of the tablet and smartphone markets.

  • Can Microsoft's Windows Phone OS surge in market share?

    Microsoft is expected to launch an update to its Windows Phone platform to version 8.1 at its annual Build developer conference on Wednesday, followed by a separate Nokia event later in the day, reportedly to announce two phones running the new OS.

  • Intel plays defense against ARM with Cloudera stake

    Intel's US$740 million investment in software company Cloudera will help sell more x86 chips in Hadoop installations, but it could also be a defensive move to maintain its server lead from the emerging threat posed by 64-bit ARM servers.

  • Invasion of the body snatchers: wearable devices are coming for you

    A place in your pocket is no longer enough for mobile gadget makers: now, they want your body.

  • Facebook may lure teen users back with virtual reality promise

    With its acquisition of virtual reality gaming company Oculus VR , Facebook may have found a way to lure back younger users to the social network.

  • Microsoft returns to scare tactic well in dump-XP campaign

    Microsoft has pulled out the big guns - a fear-of-God approach - to scare users into dumping Windows XP, telling them the most popular tasks done on a PC will put them in the crosshairs of cyber criminals.

  • In-memory technologies move databases to real time

    Last week, application-performance monitoring service provider New Relic launched an offering that allows customers to mine its operational data for business intelligence.

  • In-memory technologies move databases to real time

    Last week, application-performance monitoring service provider New Relic launched an offering that allows customers to mine its operational data for business intelligence.

  • Government open data proves a treasure trove for savvy businesses

    Ever since President Obama signed the Open Data Executive Order, government agencies have been making their vast data stores available to the public. These once-secret data sets are proving a valuable business resource, too.

  • Career Watch: The rise of people architecture

    In managing human resources, people architecture is gaining popularity, says IT workforce analyst David Foote. He explains what it is and why it's on the rise.

  • Wearables fit perfectly into Google's smart strategy

    Google's Android Wear mobile operating system is about powering smartwatches and wearables, but it also fits neatly into the company's overall smart strategy.

  • Microsoft scrambles to simplify its licensing

    Microsoft is pledging dramatic improvements to its notoriously complex enterprise licensing, but experts are skeptical about the potential impact of the plan.

  • Suddenly, wearables are big with new developer software releases

    If you didn't already think wearables were going to be big, think again. Google and Samsung are among the biggest players in this emerging tech field and both just made new wearable app developer announcements.

  • Major companies, like Target, often fail to act on malware alerts

    Companies that suffer major data breaches almost always portray themselves as victims of cutting edge attack techniques and tools. The reality, though, is often much more mundane.

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