Stories by Jon Gold

Test like crazy for Java happiness, report says

Small, responsive and dedicated performance teams tend to be the ones that produce the highest-performing Java code, according to a study released today by RebelLabs.

Google: Users still aren't getting message about online security

Google researchers say that experts and non-experts go about protecting their digital privacy in very different ways, according to survey results they plan to present at the upcoming Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security.

CTIA: FCC transparency guidelines 'irrational'

The wireless industry's chief lobbying group today issued comments on part of the FCC'S Open Internet Order that went into effect last month, saying that provisions requiring better disclosure of network management, performance and pricing figures are unfair and burdensome.

New un-jailbreaking tool Cydia Impactor for iOS has Android roots

Jailbreaking an iPhone is a process that has consequences if you want to return to the walled garden, you generally have had to either accept an iOS update that could break your ability to jailbreak the device again in the future, or find a specific version of your firmware and install it manually.

Technology, the law, and you: BYOD

(First in an occasional series about technology and the law.)

BYOD users worry employers can't keep private data safe

Workplace smartphone and tablet users worry a lot about their personal information remaining private from their employers and only a relatively slim majority trusts their employer to keep that data safe, according to a Harris Poll survey released today, which was commissioned by MDM vendor MobileIron.

In Pictures: The 10 most powerful supercomputers on Earth

2015’s first edition of the top 500 list contains a new entrant but an old champion.

The top 10 supercomputers in the world, 20 years ago

In 1995, the top-grossing film in the U.S. was Batman Forever. (Val Kilmer as Batman, Jim Carrey as the Riddler, Tommy Lee Jones as Two-Face. Yeah.) The L.A. Rams were moving back to St. Louis, and Michael Jordan was moving back to the Bulls. Violence was rife in the Balkans. The O.J. trial happened.

iPhone 7 review rollup: Apple's going to build a bazillion iPhones, but how many will be bought?

This week, you can almost hear the production lines spinning into action in China, churning out iPhone-related rumors and titillation. Here's the past few days' worth of intrigue about Apple's next-generation device.

With Raspberry Pi, FitBit in mind, BBC device targets microcomputer arena

The British Broadcasting Corporation announced yesterday that it would jump into the burgeoning market for small form-factor computers with the BBC Micro Bit, a microcomputer that's sort of a cross between a FitBit and a Raspberry Pi.

Ouster of Kubuntu founder leaves its future in doubt

A disagreement between the founder of Kubuntu and the Ubuntu Community Council has roiled the Linux community and left the project rudderless, as Jonathan Riddell left Kubuntu's governing body late last month.

iPhone 7 rumour rollup: Apple's just going to have all the money, production revs up

I feel a combination of amazement, confusion and dread, which I should really just start calling the "Apple Triad" of emotions. This week, the latest in Apple's quest to rule all it surveys and pave the road to conquest with oblong, rectangular handheld computers.

Config error at Boston-area hosting company takes down Reddit, others

A Boston-area hosting provider briefly knocked several large services and websites dependent on Amazon and AWS offline on Tuesday night, thanks to a configuration error.

LTE-U is coming to take your Wi-Fi away, consumer advocates warn

A carrier technology that uses Wi-Fi frequencies to provide LTE connectivity could let the big wireless providers mess with your home connection and push you on to their networks, according to comments filed today with the FCC by several watchdog groups.

Disparities in Internet access persist for poorer, non-white Americans, but gaps closing

Americans with historically lower rates of Internet access are making progress in getting online, but there are still persistent disparities between rich and poor, and between English-speaking Asians and other ethnicities, according to data from the Pew Research Center released today.