Stories by Lucian Constantin

ISPs can't be forced to monitor traffic for copyright infringement, ECJ rules

In what some consider to be a landmark decision, the European Court of Justice ruled Thursday that forcing Internet service providers (ISPs) to monitor consumer traffic in order to block copyright infringement is incompatible with European Union laws.

Largest DDoS attack so far this year peaked at 45 Gbps, says company

A week-long DDoS attack that launched a flood of traffic at an Asian e-commerce company in early November was the biggest such incident so far this year, according to Prolexic, a company that defends websites against such attacks.

Google protects its current HTTPS traffic against future attacks

Google has modified the encryption method used by its HTTPS-enabled services including Gmail, Docs and Google+, in order to prevent current traffic from being decrypted in the future when technological advances make this possible.

Browser extension allows users to express their email privacy expectations

A team of privacy researchers and product designers from Europe and the U.S. have released a browser-based implementation of Privicons, a project that aims to provide users with a simple method of expressing their expectations of privacy when sending email.

EFF proposes new method to strengthen Public Key Infrastructure

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is proposing an extension to the current SSL chain of trust that aims to improve the security of HTTPS and other secure communication protocols.

Security experts concerned about Google's attitude toward Android malware

Antivirus experts disagree with Chris DiBona, Google's open-source programs manager, who recently said that there is no virus problem on the Android platform and that companies selling anti-malware software for mobile operating systems are charlatans.

OpenPGP JavaScript implementation allows webmail encryption

Researchers from German security firm Recurity Labs have released a JavaScript implementation of the OpenPGP specification that allows users to encrypt and decrypt webmail messages.

Google Chrome update addresses high-severity flaw

Google has released an update for Chrome 15 which addresses a high-risk vulnerability. The security issue is the result of an out-of-bounds memory write in the browser's JavaScript engine.

ISC patches BIND denial-of-service flaw that crashed servers worldwide

The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), an organization that maintains several software products critical for Internet infrastructure, has released a patch for an actively exploited denial-of-service vulnerability in the widely used BIND DNS server.

Google offers opt-out method for Wi-Fi geolocation mapping

Google is offering wireless network owners worldwide the possibility of opting out from its Wi-Fi geolocation mapping efforts, in the wake of a decision by the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA) that this process is in violation of legislation in the Netherlands.

Unemployed Romanian hacker accused of breaking into NASA

Romanian authorities have arrested a 26-year old hacker who is accused of breaking into multiple NASA servers and causing US$500,000 in damages to the U.S. space agency's systems.

Advertisers can't be trusted to self-regulate on data collection, says EFF

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) doesn't think that the digital advertising industry can efficiently regulate itself and has issued a statement saying that the self-regulatory principles for multisite data recently published by the Digital Advertising Alliance will suffer from a lack of enforcement.

Apple secures iTunes update checking to address man-in-the-middle vulnerability

Apple's iTunes 10.5.1 update addresses a weakness in the application's update mechanism that could be exploited to trick users into visiting malicious websites.

Researchers bypass the restrictions of Mac OS X default sandbox profiles

The restrictions imposed by Mac OS X generic application sandbox profiles can be easily bypassed, researchers from Core Security Technologies found.

Germany prepares to sue Facebook over facial recognition feature

The Hamburg Data Protection Authority (DPA) is starting preliminary procedures to bring legal action against Facebook over the facial recognition feature used for photo tagging on the social network. The authority decided that further negotiation is futile after the social networking giant didn't agree to obtain consent from users retroactively.

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