Stories by Peter Sayer

Intel promises US$50m for quantum computing research

Fully functional quantum computers are still a dozen years off, which is why Intel needs to invest in fundamental research now, according to CEO Brian Krzanich.

This lawyer is building a platform for companies to seek antitrust redress from Google

Everyone wants to build a platform -- including the lawyers behind GRIP (Google Redress and Integrity Platform). The group offers companies that think they have been hurt by Google's business practices a way to evaluate potential claims for antitrust damages in European courts.

Leading AI researchers, scientists call for a ban on autonomous weapons

Ban autonomous offensive weapons before they start an arms race or a war: That's the demand of the artificial intelligence and robotics researchers who joined more than 1800 people in signing on to an open letter published Monday.

French surveillance law is constitutional, highest court says

A surveillance law rushed through the French parliament in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo shootings in Paris in January is constitutional, the country's highest court ruled late Thursday. The decision gives law enforcers and intelligence agencies the power to gather communications metadata -- who is communicating with whom, where, and when -- in real time, with few restrictions.

Cisco quits set-top box market, sells business to Technicolor

After ten years of making networked set-top boxes, Cisco Systems plans to quit the business, selling its Connected Devices division to French firm Technicolor, the companies said Thursday.

Microsoft pulls back from phone business, announces 7800 layoffs

Microsoft is scaling down its mobile phone activities, writing off the entire value of the former Nokia smartphone business it bought last year and laying off almost one-third of that business' staff.

Uber throws in the towel in battle with French taxi drivers

Uber Technologies is suspending its UberPop service in France, after a bitter fight with taxi drivers who say the service breaks the law.

Amazon now an open book on search warrants and subpoenas

Amazon.com has published its first transparency report describing how it has responded to requests from law enforcers for information about its customers.

German climate researchers prepare for rising seas of data

It's nice to have the latest kit, but a supercomputer upgrade is about to bring the German Climate Computing Center, DKRZ, a big problem: a shortage of space.

French lawmakers take first step toward gathering all communications metadata

French lawmakers have taken a first step toward allowing real-time surveillance of Internet and mobile phone use in France.

French Senate wants Google to promote its search competitors

French senators have amended a stodgy economics bill with a rider that would require Google to advertise three competitors on its home page, but stops short of explicitly requiring the search engine to disclose its algorithms.

Thin crowds greet Apple Watch in stores, suggesting fans prefer to buy, not fondle

The arrival of the Apple Watch in stores Friday failed to draw the same crowds that greeted the launch of the iPhone 6 -- but this may be a sign that Apple fans are prepared to queue overnight to buy, but not just to try.

IBM joins race to upgrade webmail interface with Verse

Google has tried it with Inbox, Microsoft handed Outlook Web App users Delve and now, with Verse, IBM is giving webmail a fresh look as it teaches its venerable Domino mail server new tricks.

French self-driving car goes for a spin around Paris monument

For this self-driving car, the roadside hazards included traffic jams, undisciplined bystanders -- and centuries-old cannons.

Huawei multiplies partnerships with software and service providers

Chinese telecommunications and networking equipment giant Huawei Technologies is partnering left, right and center at Cebit as it seeks to more firmly establish itself in Europe.