Stories by Carolyn Duffy Marsan

US carriers quietly developing IPv6 services

For a decade, IPv6 has been the classic chicken-and-egg conundrum: There has been little North American demand for IPv6, so US carriers haven't introduced IPv6 services; without commercial IPv6 services available from carriers, US government agencies and businesses can't migrate to the next-generation Internet technology.

IPv6 faces trial by fire tonight

The Internet engineering community will be eating its own dog food tonight. For one hour, the 1,250 network experts at the Internet Engineering Task Force meeting will be able to access the Internet only through IPv6. The IETF created IPv6 in the mid-1990s, but this upgrade to the Internet's main communications protocol has not yet been widely deployed -- even by the technology's biggest proponents here. Network World National Correspondent Carolyn Duffy Marsan talked with IETF Chair Russ Housley about the group's IPv6 experiment, why the transition to IPv6 is taking so long, and whether the IETF leadership is starting to panic about IPv4 addresses running out. Here are excerpts from their conversation:

Pakistan/YouTube incident: how common is hijacking

When Pakistan Telecom blocked YouTube's traffic one Sunday evening in February, the ISP created an international incident that wreaked havoc on the popular video site for more than two hours.

IETF, ITU form first-of-kind group to resolve MPLS spat

The Internet's leading standards bodies have joined forces to clarify a set of next-generation network transport specifications that critics warned could cause massive interoperability problems for service providers.

Will there be an IP address black market?

The issue of whether companies, government agencies and ISPs should be allowed to buy and sell excess IPv4 addresses is a sticky one, as outlined in our story about a new proposal by Internet policymakers. Carolyn Duffy Marsan posed a few questions about the prospects for IPv4 address trading to David Conrad, general manager of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and a long-time participant in the Internet engineering community.

Could IP address plan mean another IPv6 delay?

Internet policymakers are considering sweeping changes to the way they distribute IP addresses that could allow network operators to make money by transferring unused blocks of IPv4 address space to others in need. One result could be lessened incentive to move to IPv6 any time soon.

Powerful new antiphishing weapon DKIM emerges

Spoofers, spammers and phishers, beware. There's a new gun in town, and some of the Internet's most powerful companies -- including Yahoo, Google, PayPal and AOL -- are brandishing it in the ongoing battle against e-mail fraud.

Who's afraid of IPv4 address depletion? Apparently no one.

Who's afraid of IPv4 address depletion? Not IT professionals, according to a new survey due this week by BT INS, a Californian consulting firm.

Why Perfect Commerce is replacing its data center

Perfect Commerce, a Web-based sourcing and procurement service, is replacing its data center and related IT staff with a utility computing service from Savvis. The move is the latest example of a company choosing a utility service provider instead of internal IT department resources.

The IT department is dead, author argues

The IT department is dead, and it is a shift to utility computing that will kill this corporate career path. So predicts Nicholas Carr in his new book, "The Big Switch: Rewiring the World from Edison to Google."

Microsoft Vista's IPv6 raises new security concerns

Members of the Internet engineering community have raised several new security concerns about Teredo, a mechanism for sending IPv6 traffic over IPv4 networks that comes turned on by default in Microsoft's Vista software.

Internet Society CEO sets sights on next 'Net users

The Internet has 1.3 billion users, but that's not enough for Lynn St. Amour. As CEO of the Internet Society, she is expanding the nonprofit group, which promotes development of the Internet globally. St. Amour doubled the group's staff in 2007 and beefed up its outreach activities in Africa, South America and Asia in her bid to add another billion Internet users worldwide. National Correspondent Carolyn Duffy Marsan sat down with St. Amour this week at a meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force, an ISOC-funded standards group. Here are excerpts from their conversation:

How close is World War 3.0?

When the Estonian government was hit with major, sustained denial-of-service attacks this spring, the headlines screamed that it was the first incident of modern cyber warfare.

Green buildings make employees see red

Forget about having your own printer, coffee pot or a mini-refrigerator in your office. Heck, you can forget about having your own office, too, because you'll probably get assigned a modular desk in a big, open space.

Going nuclear: How Orbitz is greening its IT operations

Orbitz, a Chicago travel Web site, has embraced environmentalism as a corporate strategy. Now Orbitz CIO Bahman Koohestani faces the challenge of trying to make the company's electricity-hungry IT operations green.

Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia